Review & Full Album Stream: L’Ira del Baccano, Paradox Hourglass

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on April 17th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

l'ira del baccano paradox hourglass

[Click play above to stream L’Ira del Baccano’s Paradox Hourglass in its entirety. Album is out now on Subsound Records.]

Roman heavy instrumentalists L’Ira del Baccano made their studio debut in 2014 with Terra 42 (review here), as a follow-up to their summer-2013 live offering Si Non Sedes iS …LIVE. It’s important to keep in mind as one makes their way through their second studio long-player, Paradox Hourglass, that the band’s roots are in playing live, and that when it came to what they wanted to put out into the world first, it was a live album rather than something more polished. Issued through Subsound RecordsParadox Hourglass is that something more polished, but it still maintains its core of live performance beneath its progressive overtones, and across its evenly-split two sides, four tracks and 39 minutes, guitarist Alessandro “Drughito” Santori, guitarist/synthesist Roberto Malerba, bassist Ivan Contini Bacchisio and drummer Sandro “Fred” Salvi don’t sacrifice one sensibility in emphasis of the other.

While Paradox Hourglass brings forward a proggier mindset than did Terra 42 — something the band credits in part to a Rush influence and I’m not inclined to argue — it keeps its tonal edge and strips away nearly 20 full minutes of runtime, so that the material is not only vinyl-ready, but all the more efficient in making its stylistic point known without lingering. That in itself isn’t to be understated as a recognized step forward for the band, as it shows an editorial mindset developing alongside these progressive tendencies, which is something all the more crucial for a group whose sound is only growing richer.

As to the origins of the title, it’s obviously harder to say without any lyrics to work from, but it’s another evocative element from L’Ira del Baccano, which seems to find its core in the partnership between Santori and Malerba. The two weave layers of riffs and synth and effects fluidly around each other throughout Paradox Hourglass, and while ultimately there isn’t much about the record that one might consider a paradox — that is to say, they’re not making it hard to figure out where they’re coming from or purposefully melding together disparate sonic elements — the new stage their approach has reached is plain to hear from the start of 11-minute opener. And, if we’re looking for clues as to where SantoriMalerbaBacchisio and Salvi are coming from this time around, it is telling that the first piece of the two-parter title-track is subtitled “L’Ira del Baccano,” eponymous to the band itself.

Across its span and that of the complementary eight-minute “Paradox Hourglass – Part 2: No Razor for Occam,” the band touch on psychedelic melody without losing their real-world footing tonally or their underlying crunch of riff. Salvi‘s drums hold together the proceedings as they no doubt did the jams that birthed them, but whether it’s the departure-to-drift in the second half of “Paradox Hourglass – Part 1: L’Ira del Baccano” or the guitar scale-work fleshed out by layers of keys and effects swirl in the follow-up, a sense of control remains prevalent in their approach. The digital version of Paradox Hourglass presents a 19:42 bonus track that brings these two pieces together as one entirety, and while there’s still an audible break between one part and the next, hearing them in that form only highlights the nuance developing in L’Ira del Baccano‘s sound and the manner in which the band is drawing from multiple sides as they stomp and roll their way through movements tied to each other through rhythmic flow and conceptual consistency.

l'ira del baccano

Side B brings a like-minded pair of tracks, also 11 and eight minutes, respectively, that push the aesthetic somewhat further out. “Abilene” leads off with a bit more patience than “Paradox Hourglass” and more of a psychedelic flourish to its beginnings, and unfolds to a blend of desert-style riffing and the progressive course-setting that the first half of the record had as its foundation — the notion that L’Ira del Baccano know where they’re headed even if they’re keeping it a surprise from their audience. They settle into a mid-paced chug at about two minutes into “Abilene” but have more spaciousness to offer from there, and the theremin-infused (or theremin-sounding, anyhow) reaches in which they wind up are perhaps the most satisfying stretch Paradox Hourglass has to offer in terms of immersing the listener in a hypnotic flow, pushing gradually toward an apex that brings together both sides — the breadth and the crunch — on the way to a clean, purposeful finish.

At 8:06, “The Blind Phoenix Rises” ends out with no less clarity of intent than its predecessor, synth and guitar once more working together to cast an impression both psychedelic and progressive. At about 4:45, there’s a turn toward straightforward riffing, and it seems like L’Ira del Baccano made a conscious decision at that point to let loose a little bit in the studio. No complaints. The uptick in tempo from the first half of the track is welcome and though to close out they fall back into the “chorus,” such as it is, the moment of airing out a more rocking impulse is welcome as an answer to the riff that started “Paradox Hourglass – Part 1: L’Ira del Baccano” and makes as fitting an end as one could ask.

They stretch a couple seconds of silence to get over the eight-minute mark, but with the clear drive toward symmetry, one is inclined to give that ground in service to the presentation of the album as a whole. With Paradox HourglassL’Ira del Baccano are less marking their arrival than they are establishing the path they want to take as a group, but the prevailing vibe toward direction is something of a landmark for them nonetheless, even if that landmark is in the shape of an arrow pointing toward the next one. I still won’t venture a guess as to what the overarching paradox here is, though, because from where I sit, it sure seems like L’Ira del Baccano have it all figured out as to who they want to be and what they want to accomplish as a band.

L’Ira del Baccano on Thee Facebooks

L’Ira del Baccano on Bandcamp

L’Ira del Baccano website

L’Ira del Baccano at Subsound Records webstore

Subsound Records on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

L’Ira del Baccano to Release Paradox Hourglass April 14; Preorders Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 20th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

l'ira del baccano

Italian space metal instrumentalists L’Ira del Baccano will issue their new album, Paradox Hourglass, via Subsound Records on April 14. It’s listed below as their third full-length, but my count has it as their second behind 2014’s Terra 42 (review here) — entirely possible and indeed likely I’m mistaken; the band did have a live release and a split before the studio offering, if one goes by their Bandcamp discography — but either way, preorders are up now for the new one, and after Terra 42‘s blend of cosmic impulses and crunchier, solidified riffing, it seems like one to keep an eye out for.

Comprised of four likely extended-length tracks, Paradox Hourglass will be on vinyl and CD, as the PR wire affirms:

l'ira del baccano paradox hourglass

Subsound Records proudly unveil details and pre-orders for the doomdelic instrumental heavy rockers L’IRA DEL BACCANO 3rd album “PARADOX HOURGLASS”

The album will be released on 14th April, distributed by Goodfellas in Italy, Cargo Records Germany, on 5th May via CODE 7 Distribution / Plastic Head in UK and Cobraside Distribution Inc. in USA.

Available in Digipack Cd, 180 gr Coloured Vinyl and Digital

PRE-ORDERS Available: http://subsoundrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/l-ira-del-baccano

2 years and half after the critically acclaimed “TERRA 42″ the italian band returns with ” PARADOX HOURGLASS ” and continue the instrumental journey through different songs structures while melting in their unique style and sound vibes going from the doom influences of Black Sabbath with the 60’s/70’s psychedelia of Pink Floyd and Hawkwind, to heavy-prog vibes of bands like Rush, as well as the performing freedom of jam bands as The Grateful Dead.

The album has been produced in Rome at Kick Recording Studio by Marco Mastrobuono and the band mastermind Alessandro Drughito Santori. Mixed/Mastered by Mastrobuono & Matteo Kutso Gabbianelli

“PARADOX HOURGLASS” signs again the collaboration and link between the band and the Italian artist Fabio Listrani, who also did all the marvelous artwork for the previous album Terra42.

This time Listrani translate the band music and album main theme, paradoxes, in his fascination for tarots and symbolism..

Tracklist:
– Paradox Hourglass part 1 (L’Ira Del Baccano)
– Paradox Hourglass part 2 (No Razor For Occam)
– Abilene (The trip to)
– The Blind Phoenix Rises

https://www.facebook.com/LiraDelBaccano42/
https://liradelbaccanoofficial.bandcamp.com/
http://www.iradelbaccano.it/
http://subsoundrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/l-ira-del-baccano
https://www.facebook.com/subsoundrecords/

L’Ira del Baccano, Terra 42 (2014)

Tags: , , , , ,