Orange Goblin Announce Dec. UK Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

On the heels of their just-issued Assignment Help» Assignment Services » Do My Assignment; Thinking About “blog link For Me?” We Can! Scholars pursuing graduation, post Rough & Ready, Live & Loud (discussed here) digital live release, UK doom rock stalwarts and emergent social media masters And thus, lots of Computer Science students come to our website to say- http://www.naur-sir.dk/?research-essay-unit-plan. Computer Science means more than mere programming. Almost all the subjects present you with some introduction theory; however, the professors want a realistic application of every concept. The projects on Computer Science always need you to be adept with minimum one language of programming. Orange Goblin have announced their annual run of UK December shows for 2020. And hey, we all know the deal, right? These shows will happen so long as anything is happening. If the lockdown continues that long — and it very well might — then it goes without saying that the shows won’t happen. But hell’s bells, even a theoretical return to some kind of normalcy is welcome, and at this point, I’m just happy to see a list of tour dates, whether they come to fruition or not.

In addition to the live record and the tour, If you are interested in hiring a dissertation writing service Best i need an dissertation writier don#39t writing industry, then UK-Dissertation Orange Goblin have been holding Zoom Q&A sessions with the whole band, as well as playthrough videos with guitarist Acadustri provides expert http://bursadacicek.com/?custom-essays-not-plagarized and solutions including training and consultancy for pharmaceutical and academic research institutions. Joe Hoare and other such interactive whatnot. It’s encouraging to know that, though they could’ve in no way imagined this would be how they’d mark 25 years as a band, they’re making the most of the situation.

Here’s their post about the tour:

orange goblin uk tour

ORANGE GOBLIN – TOUR ANNOUNCEMENT

We are pleased to announce new headline tour dates for December 2020

As you know we are celebrating the 25th anniversary of Orange Goblin, and we’re happy to announce our December headline tour of the UK and Ireland culminating in two very special shows at London’s The Underworld.

Ben explains:
“The world is a very strange place at the moment and we are all affected by the current Covid-19 pandemic. No one knows what the future holds and when we will get back to playing shows but we are very happy to announce that this December, Orange Goblin will (hopefully) be touring the UK to celebrate our 25 Year Anniversary.

Obviously people’s safety is the main concern for us but we wanted to get these dates out there as it’s been eating away at us for a while now and we hope that having something to look forward to will bring a tiny bit of hope and happiness into everyone’s lives right now”

Orange Goblin 25th Anniversary Tour – December 2020

Fri 11 – Dublin, Grand Social
Sat 12 – Belfast, Limelight 2
Mon 14 – Glasgow, King Tuts
Tue 15 – Manchester, Gorilla
Wed 16 – Birmingham, Asylum
Thu 17 – Cardiff, The Globe
Fri 18 – London, The Underworld
Sat 19 – London, The Underworld

December tour tickets are now on sale via https://bit.ly/35BHiGv – looking forward to seeing everyone on these dates and celebrating 25 years of Orange Fucking Goblin Baby!

Don’t forget you can still grab the new live record ‘Rough & Ready, Live & Loud’ via Bandcamp at https://bit.ly/3cMTK8q – comes with an exclusive bonus track and digital booklet!

https://www.facebook.com/orangegoblinofficial/
https://twitter.com/OrangeGoblin1
https://www.instagram.com/orangegoblin1/
http://www.orange-goblin.com/
https://www.facebook.com/spinefarm
www.spinefarmrecords.com/

Orange Goblin, Rough & Ready, Live & Loud (2020)

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Friday Full-Length: Orange Goblin, Rough & Ready, Live & Loud

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Are you looking for Cultural And Civilization In Heart Of Darkness? Get online letter expert writing service when you click here. Live and Loud was the name of an Formal read review provided by myassignmenthelp.net at affordable price. Ozzy Osbourne live album, and sure enough, it’s only a couple songs into the newly-issued online help for geometry homework follow sites master thesis frozen food belgium help on dissertation risk management Rough & Ready, Live & Loud before vocalist We are leading writing service of Australia with team of writers ready for any "Sample Film Business Plan for me" requests to write the best essays for you. Get 15% OFF! Ben Ward unleashes his inner see url from our reputable company at any time convenient for you! Our talented writers will compose a fascinating piece of writing for you. Be sure Ozz, urging the crowd to go fucking crazy, have the best fucking night together, are you with me?, and all the rest of it. Awesome. The 13-track compilation of recordings from between 2016 and 2019 arrives — today — in time to take advantage of Bandcamp waiving the fees they generally collect from album sales in an effort to support artists affected, as everyone inevitably has been, by the COVID-19 pandemic. This is the second time Bandcamp have done it, and with a bit of advance notice and the experience of last time, bands seem to be giving it a significant push. For good reason. I know something like one in six Americans is currently out of work, but if you can spend some time kicking around Bandcamp today and spend a little cash, it’s a good day for it.

So we know where Diwali Essay, Inc. 87 likes. Services Include: Creative Writing, Write-Ups, Company and/or Artist Bios, Descriptions, Literature, Editing &... Orange Goblin — as ever Professional article Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep Critical Essay for everyone! Rewrite articles, papers and presentations with us! ? Timely Delivery Original Content ? Special Ward, guitarist Search results for: Homework Help In Writing A Paper dictionary. Click here for more information! Joe Hoare, bassist writing an admission essay https://sdp2.com/?p=biology-essay-help Mistakes essay on compulsory military service should i do my homework now or later Martyn Millard and drummer master thesis communication engineering Network 21 Business Plan dissertation methodology write up tips to becoming a better essay writer Christopher “Ships the Merch” Turner — got the Essays To Buy.Buy dissertation methodology online | professional american writing.Personal Essay For College.Essay online help.Professional Live and Loud part (it was also the title of a Nirvana VHS), and sure enough, there’s a Rough and Ready to go with in the 1971 third album from The Jeff Beck Group. Both are, of course, decidedly within Orange Goblin‘s purview, and if they were drawing from sources related to classic heavy rock and metal, well, that’s been Orange Goblin‘s modus for the last 25 years. Indeed, the 58-minute Rough & Ready, Live & Loud arrives as part of the band’s celebration of a quarter-century since their inception, though of course the story is rarely so clear as that, with the band having begun previously as Our Haunted Kingdom before changing their name. But 1995 was when that happened, so fair enough, and while their plans have no doubt been somewhat stifled — they also would’ve been at Desertfest this weekend, marking the occasion as the conquering heroes they are on stage — if we as the audience can’t see them lay waste, at least a captured and compiled set is something to enjoy.

And as consolation, Rough & Ready, Live & Loud offers plenty. As one would hope with a catalog of nine studio full-lengths, plus splits and so on, there’s plenty to draw from, and as they mightorange goblin rough and ready live and loud at any given headlining show — as they did last year in New York (review here), sadly without Turner — they build a set that spans front-to-back of their discography, going all the way back to “Saruman’s Wish” from 1997’s Frequencies from Planet Ten (discussed here), while maximizing energy and dynamic in tempo and their ever-boozy rhythmic shove. Orange Goblin have long since established their scope encompassing all things heavy and underground rock, doom and metal, and whether it’s anthems like “Sons of Salem” from their latest LP, 2018’s The Wolf Bites Back (review here), or the ultra-catchy roller “The Fog” from 2012’s A Eulogy for the Damned (review here), or the Bandcamp-only bonus cut “Your World Will Hate This” from 2002’s revisit-worthy Coup de Grace, or the has-become-a-personal-mantra “Some You Win, Some You Lose” from 2004’s Thieving From the House of God (discussed here), they readily nail it as one might expect a band picking tracks and assembling them together as a live record might.

That is, one should come into Rough & Ready, Live & Loud expecting a quality product, and though there are some jumps in sound as the band move from Sylak Open Air in France, August 2016, to KOKO in London, December that same year during one of their annual holiday tours, to Fuzz Club in Athens last year, a quality product is exactly what’s delivered. Conspicuously absent are regular live cuts like “Scorpionica” and “Blue Snow,” but “Shine” from 1998’s Time Travelling Blues (discussed here) is an organ-laced highlight, and even a song like “Mythical Knives” from 2014’s Back From the Abyss (review here), which wasn’t a standout in the same way as that record’s title-track, which also appears here, or “The Filthy and the Few” from 2012’s A Eulogy for the Damned (review here), proves worthy of the additional airing. Plus, those looking for “Scorpionica,” “Quincy the Pigboy,” “Blue Snow” or even “Red Tide Rising” can easily find them on 2013’s live album, A Eulogy for the Fans (review here), which is still in print so far as I know and, in any case, not hard to come by.

They cap the almost-hour-long set with the particularly Motörheady scorch of “Renegade” from The Wolf Bites Back and “Time Travelling Blues” itself, the latter’s signature introductory guitar figure led into with a simple “let’s get fucked up” before they lock into the song as they have on so many occasions, somewhere between Skynyrd, Sabbath and apocalypse. Orange Goblin are professionals, and they deliver their songs accordingly, but in the times I’ve been fortunate enough to see them, that’s never held them back from expressing either the passion for what they do or the genuine affection for their audience. This is a band that has a relationship with their listenership, and Rough & Ready, Live & Loud acknowledges this with the digital liner notes that includes fan pictures and others (one of my shots of Millard from the aforementioned New York show is there; thanks to them for using it), as well as through Ward‘s various banter encouragements and frenzy-whippings. All of this is part of the experience of seeing Orange Goblin on stage, and if Rough & Ready, Live & Loud helps bring that experience to mind, then it can only be called successful as a live album.

Orange Goblin may not get to bring their particular brand of chaos to Desertfest this weekend — always next year — and that’s a bummer, but if there’s a lesson to be found in Rough & Ready, Live & Loud, it’s that, as always: some you win, some you lose. And if you lose, you might as well make the most of it, which is exactly what they’re doing here. I can only imagine that after 25 years there’s an archive of Orange Goblin live recordings captured from along the way. Anytime they want to throw one of those up on Bandcamp for a couple bucks or whatever, it’s welcome. In the meantime, it’s worth hoping their label, Spinefarm, picks up this one for a physical release, not the least to see and hold a larger version of the cover art, which puts the four-piece as zombies on motorcycles surrounded by iconography from their studio albums. As a fan of the band, I think it’d make an awfully nice 2LP, and I can’t imagine I’d be the only one interested in such a thing, even after getting the download this morning.

I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

I think a lot about the subject/object divide and how it relates to criticism, the idea of critique itself as a creative endeavor. I know I’ve talked about it before on some levels but there are times when I get a sense of how “the critic” is perceived by “the artist,” and I always find it fascinating. Sometimes disheartening, sometimes not — some you win, some you lose. I consider myself a creative person. My background, such as it is, is in narrative fiction and creative nonfiction. Telling stories. And I very often approach writing a review the same way. Every album has a story — at least one — and if I can find out what that story is and tell that in a way that also puts the work in whatever context it might appear, I consider the endeavor successful.

The idea of “storytelling” has become a commercial buzzword. Advertising “tells stories” now. And while I take that perversion of purpose — let’s make people feel feelings so they’ll buy more shit — as a sign of increased cultural cache for narrative, plot and characterization generally, there’s no question of the manipulation happening. But still, I try to tell stories when I write. Even if, as above, the story is something as simple as “Orange Goblin kick ass, they’ve been doing so for 25 years and they put out a live album,” that’s still a story, with context. There’s still something to say about it, and I’m doing my best to say it in a creative way.

So am I an artist?

Does it help my case if I say I’m broke? Or that I have emotional baggage? I don’t know. As I say every time I’m asked and have said plenty of times when nobody has asked, I think of The Obelisk as an ongoing creative endeavor. I’ve been doing it for over 11 years. It has become, quite simply, my life’s work to this point. It will end some day. I don’t know when or how. But when it does, will The Obelisk be art, even if that art is a comment on and building off the work of others?

Isn’t all art inherently a critique on what’s come before it?

Where’s that line, between creation and critique? Does it even matter? Is there value in the perception one way or the other? In who gets to be the artist and who doesn’t?

To me, I guess there is, or I wouldn’t spend so much time thinking about it.

I don’t have any answers, or I’d give them.

Thanks for reading. Next week, that pesky High Priestess review that got away from me this week. Also hopefully the drawdown of the days of rona series, which — like the lockdown itself — is starting to drag on a bit. Also streams from Pushy, Buss, Itus and Mercury Boys, and some actual news about stuff that isn’t a spiky ball of a virus. New albums and such are happening, and it’s a relief to have something else to talk about, so I’m going to do that.

New Gimme show today. Listen at http://gimmeradio.com or on their app (which is what I use these days). Thanks if you check it out. 5PM Eastern.

Have a great and safe weekend. Thanks again for reading. Forum, radio, merch.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

The Obelisk merch

 

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Desertfest London 2020 Makes First Lineup Announcement

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 8th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

desertfest london 2020 header

Desertfest London 2020 has made its first lineup announcement, with nine acts serving as the foundation of the fray set to take place May 1-3 next year. This one happened a bit ago, concurrent I think to the Desertfest Berlin first announcement, but, well, life happens I guess. Either way, the two festivals will share an artwork theme for the first time, which feels only appropriate — one hopes Desertfest New York does the same next September, if only because I’d like to buy a poster on this theme — as well as a few acts in the likes of Masters of Reality, Corrosion of Conformity, Brant Bjork, and Orange Goblin.

They may end up sharing more than that, of course, between the bands that each has thus far revealed. There’s always a bit of stagger between one and the other as they add locals — The Brothers Keg and Green Lung and Black Orchids come to mind here — to distinguish themselves and each offer something of its own to attendees. I wouldn’t be surprised, for example, if The Picturebooks and Possessor wound up playing Berlin too, but that hasn’t been announced yet if it’s going to happen at all. You get the point.

The point is Deserfest London 2020 already looks awesome, and if you can make it, you should go. I should go too. We should all go. And hang out. It’ll be fun.

Mark your calendar:

desertfest london 2020 poster

MASTERS OF REALITY, CORROSION OF CONFORMITY, ORANGE GOBLIN + 6 MORE ANNOUNCED AS FIRST ACTS FOR DESERTFEST LONDON 2020

For their first UK appearance in five years, Masters Of Reality – Official will make their Desertfest debut as 2020 headliners next May. One of the most influential bands in desert rock history, with the genres very own Godfather at the reins, Masters is the brainchild of legendary producer Chris Goss (Welcome to Sky Valley, Rated R, Blues for The Red Sun, Songs for The Deaf). Their effortless combination of hard-rock blues with an experimentally progressive tinge makes no apologies for not sticking within the stylised box listeners would assume, yet simultaneously provides the perfect lesson in the musical ethos and story-telling of the Palm Desert scene.

Joining them on the bill will be North Carolina favourites Corrosion Of Conformity whose unmistakable Southern stomp is always a welcome addition, OG’s of the Desertfest family Orange Goblin will celebrate 25 years of relentless riffs and the desert daze continues as living legend Brant Bjork is set to bask in psychedelic sunshine.

Elsewhere we see high-octane German party duo The Picturebooks, London based psychedelic doom devotees GREEN LUNG show just why they are on our ones-to-watch-list and more home-grown talent comes in the form of space sludge stalwarts The Brothers Keg, the unhinged ferocity of Possessor and a journey of groove and reflection with the other-worldly soundscapes of Black Orchids.

Weekend tickets are now on sale and with dozens more bands to still be announced we implore you to pick up a ticket sooner rather than later!

Tickets & more info here – www.desertfest.co.uk || https://link.dice.fm/desertfest20 (*you do not need the DICE app to purchase via DICE!)

Artwork by Piotr w. Osburne

https://www.facebook.com/events/464163361105416/
http://www.desertfest.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/DesertfestLondon
https://www.instagram.com/desertfest_london/

Corrosion of Conformity, Live at Freak Valley Festival 2019

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Desertfest Berlin 2020: First Lineup Announcement: Masters of Reality, Brant Bjork, C.O.C., Orange Goblin & More

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 30th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

desertfest berlin 2020 banner

I admit, I’m going to miss seeing the poster art for Desertfest Berlin 2019 around thee social medias, but if there’s one thing that eases that loss, it’s the poster art for Desertfest Berlin 2020. It’s like something out of a cel-shaded JRPG, but, you know, awesome, and an airship is always welcome as far as I’m concerned. Will this be the year I finally get my ass to Berlin? I’d be lying if I said that their having Masters of Reality — who’ll also be in London — on the bill wasn’t a significant draw in my head. I’d wonder if they won’t do New York as well, but they don’t do a lot of shows at all, so I’m not going to bank on that. Of course, having Corrosion of Conformity, Brant Bjork, Orange Goblin, Papir, Minami Deutsch, SÅVER, Earth Tongue and Dhidalah certainly doesn’t hurt the argument either, but it’s just the beginning of Spring fest-announcement season, and so there’s much more to get all giddy-hyperbole about to come in the next few months. Hell, they haven’t even held Desertfest Belgium yet.

Bottom line: expect this airship to circle around many more times before May 1.

From the PR wire:

desertfest berlin 2020 first poster

https://www.facebook.com/events/520164272080736/

MASTERS OF REALITY | CORROSION OF CONFORMITY | BRANT BJORK | ORANGE GOBLIN | MINAMI DEUTSCH | EARTH TONGUE | PAPIR | DHIDALAH | SÂVER confirmed for Desertfest Berlin 2020!!!

Tickets now on sale at: www.desertfest-tickets.de

Finally, we are thrilled to announce the first batch of (outstanding!) acts for our 9th edition, taking place at the ARENA BERLIN May 1st – 3rd 2020. You may not believe your eyes, but it’s a dream come true: Palm Desert scene icons, Masters Of Reality – Official, are finally playing Desertfest! Fronted by Chris Goss, renowned producer of legendary bands such as Kyuss, Queen of the Stone Age and many more, with their Black Sabbath-inspired sound MASTERS OF REALITY will take you on an unforgettable trip through the desert. A true milestone in the eclectic live history of Desertfest Berlin!

It’s been a dozen years since Southern Rock legends, Corrosion Of Conformity, would reunite with Pepper Keenan to blow the doors off the whole damn scene again. In 2014, after nearly a straight decade traversing the globe as a guitarist with New Orleans supergroup DOWN, Keenan reconnected with the core C.O.C. trio of Woody Weatherman, Mike Dean and Reed Mullin to hit the road hard. And the long wait is over, we will give them a warm and heavy rocking welcome in 2020!

The Godfather of Desert Rock, Brant Bjork, will return to the Desertfest Berlin stage and revive your spirit! Brant has spent over a quarter-century at the epicenter of Californian desert rock. From cutting his teeth alongside Fatso Jetson’s Mario Lalli in hardcore punkers De-Con to drumming and composing on Kyuss’ landmark early albums, to propelling the seminal fuzz of Fu Manchu from 1994-2001 while producing other bands, putting together offshoot projects like ChĂ©, embarking on his solo career as a singer, guitarist and bandleader, founding his own record label and more, his history is a winding narrative of relentless, unflinching creativity. Expect timeless classics and a new album next Spring, and lay back to get into the groove with the one & only, Mr. BRANT BJORK live at the Arena Berlin!

Widely admired as one of the most ludicrously thunderous and entertaining live bands on the planet, longtime Desertfest comrades Orange Goblin, are on their unstoppable mission to bring us joyous, blood ’n’ thunder metal! With a steady stream of critically acclaimed albums that boldly and gleefully blurred the lines between stoner, doom, black, crust and southern rock, while always fervently saluting the old school heavy metal flag and the sacred Sabbathian code. 2020 will celebrate their 25th anniversary, still ORANGE GOBLIN is an inspiration, full of power and ready to unleash their thunder over Berlin!

Hailing from Japan, kraut rock masters Minami Deutsch have been finally confirmed for the Berlin edition of Desertfest! After their highly acclaimed show at Desertfest Belgium two years ago, desert festers in Berlin will be finally able to witness their unique, mesmerizing live performance. Kraut rock may be alive heavier than ever, but this Tokyo trio proves they are way more than just a revival act. Don’t miss this EXCLUSIVE show of the fantastic MINAMI DEUTSCH!

Sometimes music is supposed to feel weird and indescribable. It’s the moments of clarity within the dense, sonic mess that often feels the most satisfying. That’s the space that New Zealand prog-rockers Earth Tongue occupy. With their 2016- debut EP and a just released full-length album, these guys quickly became one of NZ’s most exciting underground live acts and it wasn’t long until they were playing alongside international touring bands like Red Fang, Beastwars or
Monolord. We are thrilled to welcome EARTH TONGUE live in 2020, taking us all on raw and fuzzy journey into psych-rock with a sound that weaves between melodic and jarring, with unexpected turns leaving us in a disoriented, euphoric haze.

Copenhagen trio, Papir, might be the ultimate expression of the Danish creative soul: distinctively modern, deceptively minimalistic, and stylish yet understated. A band of virtuoso musicians who move between psychedelic rock, jazz and krautrock seamlessly with the ability to hypnotize you at the Arena Berlin; PAPIR are the real deal for fans of bands alike Causa Sui, and could easily become the showboats of the scene!

Dhidalah burst into the fuzz rock scene in 2013, and has hailed from the Tokyo underground as a space rock power trio. The band name derives from the Japanese legend of the Giant Gods — known as the creaters of mountains, lakes and islands. DHIDALAH plays improvisational music performances inspired by various genres from stoner and doom to kraut rock. Give these Japanese Giant Gods a very warm welcome next Spring, when the Arena will be turned into a psychedelic wonderland!

Norway’s hottest underground act, SÂVER, is the new project of Ole Christian Helstad, Ole Ulvik Rokseth and Markus StĂžle of TOMBSTONES and HYMN. The band delivers an astounding sound of sublime heaviness, shimmering moogs, abrasive vocals and a devastating, gnarly bass. SÂVER’s tunes can be characterized by a strong component of apocalyptic synths and textural electronics hovering above the base of heavy guitars and bass – a mĂ©lange that works incredibly well, and has seen SÂVER rising up and being no longer just one of the world’s best kept music secrets!

Friends, we hope you enjoy this first round of bands as much as we do, with many more killer names to come. After last year’s changes of a new sound system, the “Black Box“, that many of you seem to appreciate, we will also again provide a lot more specials, space, and again a chill- and live zone on the ubercool Hoppetosse boat! Don’t miss THE fuzz rock party of the year, at the capitol of the almighty riffs: DESERTFEST BERLIN 2020 is ready to roll!

Tickets & more infos are now available at:
www.desertfest.de

https://www.facebook.com/events/520164272080736/
www.desertfest.de
www.facebook.com/DesertfestBerlin
www.instagram.com/desertfest_berlin

Masters of Reality, “Dreamtime Stomp”

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Live Review: Orange Goblin & The Skull in Manhattan, 08.27.19

Posted in Reviews on August 28th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Orange Goblin (Photo by JJ Koczan)

A Twofer Tuesday special with Orange Goblin headlining and The Skull opening was enough to pull a good crowd to Gramercy Theatre on 23rd St. in Manhattan, and I saw fans new and old rejoicing as the long-running London and Chicago outfits took that stage, one for the first time in months, the other for the first time in years and both with different lineups. A triumph over adversity, or a “victory over horseshit,” as Orange Goblin‘s one-time tourmates in Scissorfight so indelicately put it? You might ask absent Orange Goblin drummer Chris Turner, whose visa got held up in all kinds of security red tape and couldn’t get into the country in time, forcing the band to bring in one Chad Walls (The Living Fields, ex-The Skull live, etc.) as a last-minute replacement. As frontman Ben Ward said from the stage: he, guitarist Joe Hoare and bassist Martyn Millard had gotten hooked up with Walls less than a week prior and they rehearsed together for the first time just the day before the show. Gramercy was the first of just six dates they’ll do in America, but basically, they’d sunk all the money for everyone’s travel, backline, documents, etc., that they had to make the run happen anyway they could. Nobody’s first choice of situation, surely, but putting Walls in Turner‘s seat for the week was how it could happen.

Perhaps in less dramatic fashion, The Skull also have had a bit of turnover in just the four months since they played the inaugural Desertfest New York (review here) in April, losing guitarist Rob Wrong (also Witch Mountain) and seeing Henry Vasquez — also of Saint Vitus and Blood of the Sun — come in as their own fresh face behind the drum kit along with his Blood of the Sun bandmate Alex Johnson, who took the spot formerly occupied by Wrong on guitar. Tumult, then, might have been the running theme for the evening. Well, that and the line at the merch table, where Brian Mercer‘s poster for the brief tour awaited the lucky few who’d get one before it was gone, as well as a smattering of shirts from both bands. But the thing about it was that even through both groups have had some adversity of late, one could still look at The Skull frontman Eric Wagner or at Ward and see them smiling. Both groups still tore it up. I don’t think either of them would claim it was the tightest set they ever played, but I’ll be damned if they didn’t both pull it off, one kicking ass into the next as the room packed out and the night wore on.

Time and a rotating cast of characters across their two-to-date albums has proven guitarist Lothar Keller, bassist Ron Holzner and the aforementioned Wagner to be the core of The Skull, and though the band’s roots come from Holzner and Wagner‘s pedigree as members of Trouble — after whose landmark 1985 sophomore outing they’re named and whose material they played live in earlier incarnations of The Skull — they’ve developed a reputation of their own that at this point supersedes even that consideration. That is, you don’t go to see The Skull because those dudes were in Trouble. You go see The Skull because of The Skull‘s own work across last year’s The Endless Road Tuns Dark (review here) and their 2014 debut, For Those Which are Asleep (review here). I’m not sure if even The Skull anticipated that would be the case when they started out, but for a band who began as a means of paying homage to the legacy of Trouble, they’ve made a not-insignificant impact of their own with their two LPs (both released by NY’s own Tee Pee Records) and a healthy amount of touring at home and abroad, even amid the shifts in personnel.

As such, it was songs like “A New Generation” and “The Endless Road Turns Dark,” “Until the Sun Turns Black” and “Send Judas Down” that the crowd was there to see more than anything out of Holzner and Wagner‘s shared history. With Johnson and Vasquez as the new guys and Keller a steady foundation on guitar, The Skull unleashed that slew of memorable choruses, finding Keller backing Wagner on vocals periodically while still tossing out choice solos and the rolling riffs that still seem so emblematic of Midwestern doom — like a flat Illinois skyline, one never quite knows where the horizon actually is. The speedier “The Longing” from the second record was a highlight, and the title-track of For Those Which are Asleep made a suitable finale to their time on stage, following in a one-two punch from “Send Judas Down” that emphasized The Skull‘s level of craft for the strength that it has turned out to be. As someone who’s watched The Skull play live here and there for the last seven years, their progression has been natural and fluid, and they always seem to find their anchor, despite the lineup turnover. Songwriting helps. And stage presence. And chemistry.

These are tools very much in Orange Goblin‘s rather sprawling arsenal — more of an underground bunker, I guess — as well. And for what it’s worth, the context of this show made the professionalism of their set and the mere fact that they pulled it off all the more impressive. There was a hiccup or two as the band ran through 17 songs culled from their quarter-century-spanning catalog — Ward laughed on stage as he admitted he messed up during “Quincy the Pigboy” — but Orange Goblin still gave New York the show it came to see, even minus Turner. Coming out as ever to AC/DC‘s “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock & Roll),” they tore into “Scorpionica” and “The Filthy and the Few” and “Sons of Salem” to rile the crowd before dipping back further for “Saruman’s Wish” and pitting newer stuff like the title-track of last year’s The Wolf Bites Back (review here) and “Renegade” against “The Fog” from 2012’s A Eulogy for the Damned (review here) or “The Devil’s Whip” off of 2014’s Back from the Abyss (review here). It was righteous enough to incite a mosh that Ward used to break the crowd in half for a kind wall of doom (as opposed to a wall of death) that seemed to go over well from where I stood, well out of its way.

Orange Goblin via social media have been dropping not at all subtle hints that these might be their last US shows, which is something Ward directly contradicted several times between songs: “We’ll be back, better, stronger, whatever.” It might be the simple fact that Turner didn’t get into the country motivating that — it’s not how I’d want to go out, if I was Orange Goblin — but for whatever it’s worth, it’s not at all like the band sounds done. Hell, the show Millard put on on bass alone would’ve been worth the trip into the city to see, never mind Hoare strutting around or Ward jumping off the stage to high-five the crowd, potentially to the peril of the audience’s shoulders. Even in hard circumstances, their command of their material was unflinching, and in the tightest of tight spots, Walls did nothing but hold his own alongside players who, unlike The Skull, haven’t seen a real lineup change in 15 years. Hoare had missed some dates years back, I think, but beyond that, the culture of Orange Goblin is and has been Ward, Hoare, Millard and Turner. Put it on your fucking t-shirt. For Walls to step into that as gracefully as he was able to do is a significant accomplishment.

I stuck around for the whole set because I knew “Cities of Frost” and “They Come Back” were in there later on, and was treated to a bonus cover of Motörhead‘s “No Class” as a reward. They rounded out with “Quincy the Pigboy” and “Red Tide Rising” before sending the Gramercy Theatre crowd staggering onto the sidewalk, an ambulance outside with its lights going I guess for somebody who hit it extra hard (hopefully nothing serious). Because it was that kind of night, I’d gotten parking directly across the street from the venue and was pleased to find I hadn’t missed a sign or a hydrant and my car was still there after the show ended at just about 11PM. I was back to my ancestral homestead before midnight, which was just fine with the alarm set for four hours later.

The tour they’re on will bring Orange Goblin through Muddy Roots Music Festival in Tennessee this week, as well as Chicago and other cities listed here. If you can go, you should. I don’t know if it’ll be their last time in the States or not. I don’t know anything. I interviewed Ward last year (didn’t get to post it because the audio didn’t come out) and he said they probably wouldn’t get over at all, so take that as a sign of how fortunate we are to get even the short stretch we’ve got. Either way, this is a band you should see. Not just for the influence they’ve had on their native scene in the UK, or because they’ve been around for a long time, but because they put on an absolute clinic in how to do rock and roll right. In a situation that would’ve undone lesser bands, they did nothing but shine. And destroy.

More pics after the jump. Thanks for reading.

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Orange Goblin Announce US Dates Starting Aug. 27

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 5th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

ORANGE GOBLIN DAVID BOULONGNE

Okay, got your calendar marked yet? Got a place to crash if you need one? Well, doesn’t matter. You can figure that out later. The point is Orange Goblin are coming to the US supporting their righteous 2018 offering, The Wolf Bites Back (review here), and they’re doing six shows, and that’s probably it for the entire album cycle. And while you’ve got your leather-bound day-planner out, you might want to make a note to yourself to send a thank you card to Muddy Roots Fest in Tennessee, because if they weren’t bringing the band over to play, the tour probably wouldn’t be happening at all, so really they’re just doing everyone a favor. So yeah, thanks Muddy Roots.

New York, Chicago, Muddy Roots, Dallas, Austin and Los Angeles. That’s it. They’re giving everyone plenty of times to get their lives in order and make showing-up happen. Frankly, if these shows don’t sell out, it’s a sad day in America.

From the PR wire:

orange goblin tour

Orange Goblin Announces U.S. Tour Dates

UK Heavy Metal Titans to Play Exclusive Live Shows in NYC, Chicago, Los Angeles, Austin and more this Summer

Orange Goblin, the heavy hitting British metal band that has inspired a generation of up-and-coming rock acts has announced summer U.S. headlining tour dates. The week-long set of exclusive live shows will kick off on August 27 in New York City and will include a performance as part of the 2019 Muddy Roots Festival on August 30, where the respected group will share the stage with MC50, Off!, and more.

Orange Goblin continues to tour in support of its most recent album, ‘The Wolf Bites Back’, the band’s ninth studio release. Support on the Orange Goblin tour will come from a slew of today’s best underground rock acts including The Skull, Mothership, Wo Fat and Black Cobra.

“We haven’t been able to tour the US since 2014 so it’s been a long 5 years, but we are excited to be coming back this year for a select few dates,” says vocalist Ben Ward. “We have gathered an amazing array of supports for this special tour and we can’t wait to bring the Orange Goblin thunder back to our rabid US fan base! Grab your tickets ASAP as these will be the most insane, wild and memorable shows we have done in the US, drawing on our full back catalog of material spanning the bands whole career! Let’s have it America, Orange fuckin’ Goblin is back!”

Orange Goblin US tour dates:
August 27 New York, NY Gramcery Theatre (w/ The Skull)
August 29 Chicago, IL Thalia Hall (w/ The Skull)
August 30 Cookeville, TN June Bug Boogie Ranch (as part of Muddy Roots Festival)
August 31 Dallas, TX Gas Monkey (w/ The Skull, Mothership, Wo Fat)
September 1 Austin, TX Come and Take It Live (w/ The Skull, Mothership)
September 2 Los Angeles, CA Regent Theatre (w/ Black Cobra)

Orange Goblin UK/Europe live dates:
06.04 – Faster & Louder Fest, Eindhoven, Netherlands
11.05 – HRH Road Trip, Ibiza, Spain
18.05 – Manorfest, Keighley, UK
23.06 – Graspop Metal Meeting, Dessel, Belgium
29.06 – Full Force Festival, Ferropolis, Germany
05.07 – Oltrasuoni Festival, Dro, Italy
06.07 – Traffic Club, Rome, Italy
07.07 – Cueva Club, Cagliari, Sardinia
28.09 – HRH Doom V Stoner IV, Sheffield, UK

In addition to vocalist Ben Ward, Orange Goblin features Joe Hoare (guitar), Martyn Millard (bass) and Chris Turner (drums).

https://www.facebook.com/orangegoblinofficial/
https://twitter.com/OrangeGoblin1
https://www.instagram.com/orangegoblin1/
http://www.orange-goblin.com/
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www.spinefarmrecords.com/

Orange Goblin, Live in Moscow, March 29, 2019

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Friday Full-Length: Electric Wizard & Orange Goblin, Chrono.Naut / Nuclear Guru Split

Posted in Bootleg Theater on March 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Electric Wizard & Orange Goblin, Split (1998)

Man’s Ruin Records had a thing for 10″ vinyl. Maybe it was cheaper at the time — oddly enough I’m not up on what pressing costs were 22 years ago — or maybe label head Frank Kozik took it as an aesthetic thing, but either way, during the years the imprint was active before sadly going belly-up in 2001/2002, it was responsible for 10″ EP releases from Kyuss, the Melvins, The Heads, Honky, Acid King, Entombed, Desert Sessions, Nebula, Dozer, Church of Misery, Iron Monkey, Fatso Jetson and a slew of others, some of which also wound up seeing issue on CD as splits — that’s also how the various volumes of Desert Sessions were compiled. The two EPs that make up the shared Man’s Ruin release between Electric Wizard and Orange Goblin indeed were issued separately first as 10″ vinyls, with Electric Wizard‘s Chrono.Naut seeing two pressings on purple andelectric wizard chrononaut orange platters starting in Sept. 1997 and Orange Goblin‘s Nuclear Guru two-songer arriving that December in similar fashion on orange vinyl.

Either way, particularly in hindsight, teaming them up seems prescient as to the impact both bands would ultimately have on the heavy underground, especially in the UK. Electric Wizard had offered up their self-titled debut (discussed here) in 1994/1995 through Rise Above, and their landmark second album, Come My Fanatics… arrived earlier in ’97, which put it roughly concurrent to Orange Goblin‘s own debut, Frequencies from Planet Ten (discussed here). Between the two shorter releases, Chrono.Naut was the more distinctive between the vinyl and CD versions, as the single song that comprised the release was split into two parts for the 10″ and presented in its 17-minute entirety on the compact disc. However one might come by it though, it’s essential early Electric Wizard. With the Dorset trio working with the classic lineup of guitarist/vocalist Jus Oborn, bassist Tim Bagshaw and drummer Mark Greening, they answer the call of prime raw Sabbath worship in the song’s first part, rolling out a stoned-as-ElectricWizard nod with an underproduced sensibility that — as the best of the band’s work does — turns that trashy sound into an aesthetic element. At 6:49 or thereabouts into the track, Oborn lets out an “alright!” and the trio shift into a dreamy, spaced-out jam that still holds to that rawness but stands among the most improvised-sounding moments they’ve ever put to tape. Labeled as “Chrono.Naut Phase II (Chaos Revealed),” it remains distinct even among Electric Wizard‘s other longform material, such as the two extended cuts on the Supercoven EP that showed up next year and were more coated in the grit that would soon enough make 2000’s Dopethrone (discussed here) the generation-defining monster it was.

Likewise, it’s strange to listen to Orange Goblin‘s “Nuclear Guru” and their take on “Hand of Doom” and have the one hold up to the other. Kind of blasphemy, right? I mean, that’s not just Black Sabbath — it’s Black Sabbath from Paranoid! But especially listening to the two right next to each other, for the sheer quality of the track, “Nuclear Guru” has every bit as much to offer the listener as “Hand of Doom.” Of course, one would be remiss to overlook the fact that Orange Goblin doesn’t happen without Black Sabbath as an influence — ditto Electric Wizard, while we’re at it — but the point is that hearing the songs side-by-side more than two decades after the fact, they’re both classic. And in the context of its arriving as part of a split with Electric Wizard, “Nuclear Guru” stresses how much of Orange Goblin‘s strength has orange goblin nuclear gurualways been in their songwriting. What was then the five-piece of vocalist Ben Ward (recently wedded; congrats to him), guitarists Joe Hoare and Pete O’Malley, bassist Martyn Millard and drummer Christopher Turner were certainly in their formative stages, but even then, they had the hooks and forward groove that would make their brand of doom rock as hugely influential as it became. And their take on “Hand of Doom” wasn’t just faithful to the original in terms of tone — an accomplishment unto itself — but it still brought the band’s signature stomp to its later verses and a boozer’s psychedelic edge to the leads. As Black Sabbath were just starting to get back together with their original lineup at the time, the homage feels well placed both in terms of showcasing Orange Goblin‘s roots and what they were able to bring to them in order to define their own sound.

All told, it’s about half and hour from two bands who would go on and continue to earn forerunner status in English heavy, their styles being picked up on not only by their peers — one could argue they influenced each other to some degree as well, especially early on — but successive generations of groups in the UK and beyond. They were both entering crucial eras for their approach, as Electric Wizard, as noted, had just put out Come My Fanatics… and would soon move onto Supercoven and Dopethrone, which some would argue as the pinnacle of their work — not me; I’m a believer in 2007’s Witchcult Today (discussed here) as their to-date crown jewel — while Orange Goblin would well earn a reputation for brash doom with Time Travelling Blues (discussed here) in 1998 and The Big Black (discussed here) in 2000. But as much as all things stoner, doom and/or heavy might’ve seemed like outsider art at the time, it’s striking just how sure of what they’re doing both bands sound on their split. There’s no doubt as Electric Wizard jam into oblivion on “Chrono.Naut” or as Orange Goblin shuffle through the later moments of “Nuclear Guru” that they knew what they were after in terms of style, or for that matter that they knew how to make that happen in the writing (or improvising) and recording. Not only were they in it early, they were in it early and kicking ass.

Certainly both would be a factor in establishing the height of their influence on the many who’ve followed the paths they each laid out.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

I let myself sleep in this morning, inadvertently. I woke up at around 2AM and was up for about an hour. With the alarm set for 4, going back to sleep at 3:15 felt needlessly cruel, so I set it for 4:30. When it went off, I turned it off, rolled over to get up and the next thing I knew it was quarter to six. Whoops. So much for productivity early in the day.

Doesn’t particularly matter, but it means that morning nap continues to be the time during which I get the most work done as it has been for the last couple weeks. I don’t love that system, but I don’t love getting up at 3:30 either, so you know, you give and take.

Next week is the Quarterly Review. It will run six days and include 60 albums. There’s a Saint Vitus premiere scheduled as well for Tuesday and maybe another video premiere on Thursday, but other than that, it’s all QR all the way. Expect fewer news posts, because that’s the tradeoff I need to make in order to survive the thing.

Oh, I’m also going to see All Them Witches next week in Boston. That’ll be fun.

And Sunday is a new episode of The Obelisk Show on Gimme Radio. It’s a cool one, don’t miss it. 7PM Eastern, Sunday. Replay is Tuesday, 9AM Eastern. Listen at http://gimmeradio.com.

We’ve been down in Jersey all week as The Patient Mrs. has had Spring break (woo!), and that’s been good, but this weekend we’ll head back north in order to facilitate her going back to work Monday evening. It isn’t a short ride, but it’s generally worth the trip to be down here. Where we stay there’s more room for The Pecan to run around — and he does — and he needs all the space he can get. “Little Orc, bru-ra-rum,” and so on.

I’m gonna punch out so I can try and set up the back end of posts for the Quarterly Review before I start to fall asleep at the keyboard, so I’ll just wish you a great and safe weekend and leave it there. Have fun, don’t forget to listen to the Gimme Show, and thanks for reading.

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The Top 20 of 2018 Year-End Poll — RESULTS!

Posted in Features on January 1st, 2019 by JJ Koczan

derp

If you’re reading this, congratulations on making it all the way through the existential rollercoaster that was 2018.

I hope you celebrated that year’s end and this year’s beginning in riotous fashion if that’s your thing, and if you’re more the stay-at-home-and-don’t-break-stuff type, I hope that was fun too.

Over the last month, best-of lists have been collected from all around the world and as we move into 2019, it’s time to do the results of the Year-End Poll for 2018.

What a year. As I look back on the lists submitted, of course I can’t help but think how absolutely incredible 2018 was for music. With the world crumbling around, creativity surged, and the quality of output was off the charts. I published my own list last week and was quickly inundated with stuff I forgot or that I missed owing to being robbed earlier this year — I guess I didn’t even realize until the post went up just how much that screwed me — and I’m sure there’s more still out there from what everyone turned in. It’s infinite. It keeps going. Trends change. Sounds change. People change. Creativity flourishes.

But I think if you’re reading this, you know why we’re here. We wound up with somewhere in the neighborhood of 2,000 discrete releases submitted. That’s more than five for every day of the year. And they came from 547 people, which is amazing. Accordingly, there should be plenty here to keep you busy for a while.

Not exactly suspenseful as to which was the album of the year, but it’s still interesting to see where stuff landed. Just to remind, there are two lists, one of the raw votes, and one in which a 1-4 ranking is worth five points, 5-8 worth four, 9-12 worth three, 13-16 worth two and 17-20 worth one. Thanks as always to Slevin for the help in setting up the back end functionality and compilation scripts.

Let’s go:

Top 20 of 2018 — Weighted Results

sleep the sciences

1. Sleep, The Sciences (1,087 points)
2. YOB, Our Raw Heart (721)
3. High on Fire, Electric Messiah (478)
4. Earthless, Black Heaven (413)
5. King Buffalo, Longing to Be the Mountain (408)
6. Windhand, Eternal Return (387)
7. All Them Witches, ATW (373)
8. Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats, Wasteland (354)
9. Clutch, Book of Bad Decisions (323)
10. Fu Manchu, Clone of the Universe (315)
11. Greenleaf, Hear the Rivers (285)
12. Holy Grove, Holy Grove II (274)
13. Graveyard, Peace (225)
14. Brant Bjork, Mankind Woman (222)
15. Weedpecker, III (212)
16. Corrosion of Conformity, No Cross No Crown (197)
17. Monster Magnet, Mindfucker (189)
18. Conan, Existential Void Guardian (188)
19. The Skull, The Endless Road Turns Dark (167)
20. ASG, Survive Sunrise (164)

Honorable Mention:
Messa, Feast for Water (150)
Gozu, Equilibrium (148)
Judas Priest, Firepower (148)
Naxatras, III (148)
Forming the Void, Rift (146)

I’m not saying everyone had to love the Sleep record, but there’s no way it wasn’t the biggest underground heavy release of the year. That top spot was established the first day the poll went up and while YOB caught up as both neared 100 votes, there was no doubt how it would ultimately shake out. It was pretty clear early on what people were passionate about, but there are some interesting differences between the raw vote and the weighted results even high on the list, as you’ll see below.

Top 20 of 2018 — Raw Votes

sleep the sciences

1. Sleep, The Sciences (263 votes)
2. YOB, Our Raw Heart (185)
3. High on Fire, Electric Messiah (141)
4. Windhand, Eternal Return (115)
5. Earthless, Black Heaven (109)
6. King Buffalo, Longing to Be the Mountain (102)
7. Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats, Wasteland (101)
8. All Them Witches, ATW (95)
8. Clutch, Book of Bad Decisions (95)
9. Fu Manchu, Clone of the Universe (93)
10. Greenleaf, Hear the Rivers (77)
10. Holy Grove, Holy Grove II (77)
11. Graveyard, Peace (69)
12. Brant Bjork, Mankind Woman (67)
13. Weedpecker, III (63)
14. Monster Magnet, Mindfucker (57)
14. Conan, Existential Void Guardian (57)
15. Corrosion of Conformity, No Cross No Crown (54)
16. The Skull, The Endless Road Turns Dark (50)
17. ASG, Survive Sunrise (48)
18. Gozu, Equilibrium (46)
19. Forming the Void, Rift (45)
20. Judas Priest, Firepower (43)
20. Khemmis, Bloodletting (43)
20. Mos Generator, Shadowlands (43)
20. Orange Goblin, The Wolf Bites Back (43)

Honorable Mention:
Messa, Feast for Water (41)
Domkraft, Flood (40)
Naxatras, III (40)
Thou, Magus (40)

Everything else got fewer than 40 raw votes. Why cap it at 40? I don’t know. Good a place as any. And when a top 20 has 26 releases on it, I don’t imagine there will be too many complaints about not enough stuff being included. One can hope, anyhow. You can see the difference between Sleep and everyone else here as well, a pretty precipitous drop after both them and YOB, and YOB and High on Fire — the top three being well ahead of everyone else in terms of general agreement.

The ‘Respect the Hustle’ Award

Somewhere around the middle of the month, I noticed a massive surge of votes for a band called EntropĂ­a and their debut album, Invisible. A bunch of people with lists of 20 just including EntropĂ­a. I’ve included them below, you can see them. I didn’t know what was up, whether it was the band spamming the vote or what, so I sent them a message. Turns out they had sent the link to their email list and asked for votes, and that’s how they all got in. Well, okay.

They wound up with well over 750 raw votes (to remind, Sleep got 263), and it didn’t feel representative to have them be album of the year, but hey, I respect the hustle, so they get the award accordingly. Nicely done, folks. I’ve been doing Year-End Polls since like 2010 and that’s never happened before. Their totals were 2,367 points and 777 votes.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart for reading. Whether this is the only post you’ve seen this year or you click ‘Like’ on everything that comes across your Facebook feed, your support is tremendously appreciated. This is the only post that will go up today, but we’ll be back to business as usual tomorrow, and in the meantime, you’ll find everybody’s list included after the jump.

All the best for 2019.

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