Høstsabbat 2019: Hexvessel and Suma Added

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 22nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

hostsabbat 2019 banner

You already know what I love about this, right? It’s how different these two bands are. Hexvessel — who, I admit, were announced last week; as ever, the Quarterly Review has me all jammed up as on other stuff waiting to be posted, so I thought it better to combine announcements rather than fall behind twice — and a Finnish freak-folk band, worshiping the natural world. Suma, from Sweden, would seem to only want to crush things natural and manmade alike with their chaotic and brutal noise. It’s what you’d call an unexpected pairing, and that’s exactly why I dig it. Maybe they’ll play back to back. That’d be fun.

There’s one more announcement next Friday from Høstsabbat 2019. Yes, I know who it is. It’s awesome. You don’t want to miss it. I’m not going to give you a clue, but it’s someone I’m very excited to see.

Here are confirmations for Hexessel and Suma in the meantime:

Most of the time these band descriptions kind of write themselves. This next band however, is something completely different.

Their latest album “All Tree”, released one month ago on Century Media Records, has spellbounded the Høstsabbat camp completely. Hexvessel operate in their own universe, mixing classic folky tones and groove, with the flourishing sounds of the 60’s-era. Freedom and no restraint is key.

The band serves the listener a lush experience, putting a smile on your face, teasing you for a walk in the sun leaving all things bad behind… Sometimes that’s what music is all about, right?

It’s also a landmark, to finally have the first Finnish band represented on our lineup. Can you imagine a better debut for these beautiful people from the East, than having HEXVESSEL play the Church? We surely can’t.

Please welcome HEXVESSEL to Høstsabbat 2019!

Ooooh, the heaviness!!!!

We are closing in on the announcements for this years’ festival, but there’s still two more goodies to come.

The first one is SUMA, probably one of the heaviest, hardest hitting, monstrous entities in our entire scene. For anyone who has witnessed this beast of a live act, there’s no doubt who’s in charge. We’ve seen people passing out, lying unconscious on the floor, knocked out totally, of the sheer weight coming out of the PA. They play around with the heavy with the greatest of ease, adding details, odd rhythms and undeniable grooves like true masters

SUMA are no strangers to Høstsabbat, and it’s one of those bands we knew we had to invite back at some point. Having gained momentum ever since their latest visit, these fellas from Malmö, Sweden, will lay waste to all crossing their path.

This steamroller will leave you flat.

FESTIVAL TICKETS
http://bit.ly/HSfestivalpass

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST – HØSTSABBAT 2019
http://bit.ly/HS2019playlist

https://www.facebook.com/events/274561413173994/
https://www.facebook.com/hostsabbat/
http://hostsabbat.no/

Hexvessel, “Changeling” official video

Suma, The Order of Things (2016)

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Quarterly Review: Stuck in Motion, AVER, Massa, Alastor, Seid, Moab, Primitive Man & Unearthly Trance, Into Orbit, Super Thief, Absent

Posted in Reviews on March 18th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

quarterly-review-spring-2019

Let the games begin! The rules are the same: 10 albums per day, this time for a total of 60 between today and next Monday. It’s the Quarterly Review. Think of it like a breakfast buffet with an unending supply of pancakes except the pancakes are riffs and there’s only one dude cooking them and he’s really tired all the time and complains, complains, complains. Maybe not the best analogy. Still, it’s gonna be a ton of stuff, but there are some very, very cool records included, so please keep your eyes and your mind open for what’s coming, because you might find something here you really dig. If not, there’s always tomorrow. Let’s go.

Quarterly Review #1-10:

Stuck in Motion, Stuck in Motion

stuck in motion self-titled

The classic style cover art of Swedish trio Stuck in Motion‘s self-titled debut tells much of the story. It’s sweet-toned vintage-style soul rock, informed by Graveyard to some degree, but more aligned to retroism. The songs are bluesy and natural and not especially long, but have vibe for weeks, as demonstrated on the six-minute longest-track “Dreams of Flying,” or the flute-laden closer “Eken.” What the picture doesn’t tell you is the heavy use of clavinet in the band’s sound and just how much the vintage electric piano adds to what songs like “Slingrar” with its ultra-fluid shifts in tempo, or the sax-drenched penultimate cut “Orientalisk.” Comprised of guitarist/vocalist Max Kinnbo, drummer Gustaf Björkman and bassist/vocalist/clavinetist Adrian Norén, Stuck in Motion‘s debut successfully basks in a mellow psychedelic blues atmosphere and shows a patience for songwriting that bodes remarkably well. It should not be overlooked because you think you’re tired of vintage-style rock.

Stuck in Motion on Thee Facebooks

Stuck in Motion on Bandcamp

 

AVER, Orbis Majora

aver orbis majora

Following up their 2015 sophomore outing, Nadir (review here), which led to them getting picked up by Ripple Music, Australia’s AVER return with the progressive shove of Orbis Majora, five songs in 50 minutes of thoughtfully composed heavy progadelica, and while it’s not all so serious — closer “Hemp Fandango” well earns its title via a shuffling stonerly groove — opener “Feeding the Sun” and the subsequent “Disorder” set a mood of careful craftsmanship in longform pieces. The album’s peak might be in the 13-minute “Unanswered Prayers,” which culls together an extended linear build that’s equal parts immersive and gorgeous, but the rest of the album hardly lacks for depth or clarity of purpose. An underlying message from the Sydney four-piece would seem to be that they’re going to continue growing, even after more than a decade, because it’s not so much that they’re feeling their way toward their sound, but willfully pushing themselves to refine those parameters.

AVER on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

 

Massa, Walls

massa walls

Flourish of keys adds nuance to Massa‘s moody, heavy post-rock style, the Rotterdam-based trio bringing an atmosphere to their second EP, Walls, across five tracks and 26 minutes marked by periodic samples from cinema and a sense of scope that seems to be born of an experimental impulse but not presented as the experiment itself. That is, they take the “let’s try this!” impulse and make a song out of it, as the chunky rhythm of instrumental centerpiece “Expedition” or the melodies in the prior “#8” show. Before finishing with the crash-into-push of the relatively brief “Intermassa,” the eight-minute “The Federal” complements winding guitar with organ to affect an engaging spirit somewhere between classic and futurist heavy, with the drums holding together proceedings that would seem to convey all the chaos of that temporal paradox. Perhaps it was opener “Shiva” that set this creator/destroyer tone, but either way, Massa bask in it and find a grim sense of identity thereby.

Massa on Thee Facebooks

Massa on Bandcamp

 

Alastor, Slave to the Grave

alastor slave to the grave

The first full-length from Swedish doomplodders Alastor and their debut on RidingEasy Records, late 2018’s Slave to the Grave is the four-piece’s most expansive offering yet in sonic scope as well as runtime. Following the 2017 EPs Blood on Satan’s Claw (review here) and Black Magic (review here), the seven-song/56-minute offering holds true to the murk-toned cultism and dense low-end rumble of the prior offerings, but the melodic resonance and sense of updating the aesthetic of traditional doom is palpable throughout the roller “Your Lives are Worthless,” while the later acoustic-led “Gone” speaks to a folkish influence that suits them surprisingly well given the heft that surrounds. They make an obvious focal point of 17-minute closer “Spider of My Love,” which though they’ve worked in longer forms before, is easily the grandest accomplishment they’ve yet unfurled. One might easily say the same applies to Slave to the Grave as a whole. Those who miss The Wounded Kings should take particular note of their trajectory.

Alastor on Thee Facebooks

RidingEasy Records website

 

Seid, Weltschmerz, Baby!

seid-weltschmerz_baby-web

If Norwegian space-psych outfit Seid are feeling weary of the world, the way they show it in Weltschmerz, Baby! is by simply leaving it behind, substituting for reality a cosmic starscape of effects and synth, the odd sample and vaguely Hawkwindian etherealism. The centerpiece title-track is a banger along those lines, a swell of rhythmic intensity born out of the finale of the prior “Satan i Blodet” and the mellow, flowing “Trollmannens Hytte” before that, but the highlight might be the subsequent “Coyoteman,” which drifts into dream-prog led by echoing layers of guitar and eventually given over to a fading strain of noise that “Moloch vs. Gud” picks up with percussive purpose and flows directly into the closer “Mir (Drogarna Börjar Värka),” rife with ’70s astro-bounce and a long fadeout that’s less about the record ending and more about leaving the galaxy behind. Starting out at a decent clip with “Haukøye,” Weltschmerz, Baby! is all about the journey and a trip well worth taking.

Seid on Thee Facebooks

Sulatron Records website

 

Moab, Trough

moab trough

A good record tinged by the tragic loss of drummer Erik Herzog during the recording and finished by guitarist/vocalist Andrew Giacumakis and bassist Joe Fuentes, the 10-track/39-minute Trough demonstrates completely just how much Moab have been underrated since their 2011 debut, Ab Ovo (discussed here), and across the 2014 follow-up, Billow (review here), as they bring a West Coast noise-infused pulse to heavy rock drive on “All Automatons” and meet an enduring punker spirit face first with “Medieval Moan,” all the while presenting a clear head for songcraft amid deep-running tones and melodies. “The Will is Weak” makes perhaps the greatest impact in terms of heft, but heft is by no means all Moab have to offer. With the very real possibility this will be their final record, it is a worthy homage to their fallen comrade and a showcase of their strengths that’s bound someday to get the attention it deserves whenever some clever label decides to reissue it as a lost classic.

Moab on Thee Facebooks

Moab on Bandcamp

 

Primitive Man & Unearthly Trance, Split

primitive man unearthly trance split

Well of course it’s a massive wash of doomed and hate-filled noise! What were you expecting, sunshine and puppies? Colorado’s Primitive Man and Brooklyn’s Unearthly Trance team up to compare misanthropic bona fides across seven tracks of blistering extremity that do Relapse Records proud. Starting with the collaborative intro “Merging,” the onslaught truly commences with Primitive Man’s 10-minute “Naked” and sinks into an abyss with the instrumental noisefest “Love Under Will,” which gradually makes its way into a swell of abrasive drone. Unearthly Trance, meanwhile, proffer immediate destructiveness with the churning “Mechanism Error” and make “Triumph” dark enough to live up to its most malevolent interpretations, while “Reverse the Day” makes me wonder what people who heard Godflesh in the ’80s must’ve thought of it and the six-minute finishing move “418” answers back to Primitive Man‘s droned-out anti-structure with a consuming void of fuckall depth. It’s like the two bands cut open their veins and recorded the disaffection that spilled out.

Primitive Man on Thee Facebooks

Unearthly Trance on Thee Facebooks

Relapse Records website

 

Into Orbit, Shifter

Into Orbit Shifter

Progressive New Zealander two-piece Into OrbitPaul Stewart on guitar and Ian Moir on drums — offer up the single Shifter as the answer to their 2017 sophomore long-player, Unearthing. The Wellington instrumentalists did likewise leading into that album with a single that later showed up as part of a broader tracklist, so it may be that they’ve got another release already in the works, but either way, the 5:50 standalone track finds them dug into a full band sound with layered or looped guitar standing tall over the mid-paced drumming, affecting an emotion-driven atmosphere as much as the cerebral nature of its craft. Beginning with a thick chug, it works into more melodic spaciousness as it heads toward and through its midsection, lead guitar kicking in with harmony lines joining soon after as the two-piece build back up to a bigger finish. Whatever their plans, Into Orbit make it clear that just because something is prog doesn’t mean it needs to be staid or lack expressiveness.

Into Orbit on Thee Facebooks

Into Orbit on Bandcamp

 

Super Thief, Eating Alone in My Car

super thief eating alone in my car

Noise-punk intensity pervades Eating Alone in My Car, the not-quite-not-an-LP from Austin four-piece Super Thief. They call it an album, and that’s good enough for me, especially since at about 20 minutes there isn’t much more I’d ask of the thing that it doesn’t deliver, whether it’s the furious out-of-mindness of minute-long highlight “Woodchipper” or the poli-sci critique of that sandwiches the offering with opener “Gone Country” immediately taking a nihilist anti-stance while closer “You Play it Like a Joke but I Know You Really Mean It” — which consumes nearly half the total runtime at 9:32 — seems to run up the walls unable to stick to the “smoke ’em if you got ’em” point of view of the earlier cut. That’s how the bastards keep you running in circles, but at least Super Thief know where to direct the frustration. “Six Months Blind” and the title-track have a more personal take, but are still worth a read lyrically as much as a listen, as the rhythm of the words only adds to the striking personality of the material.

Super Thief on Thee Facebooks

Learning Curve Records website

 

Absent, Towards the Void

absent towards the void

Recorded in 2016, released on CD in 2018 and snagged by Cursed Tongue Records for a vinyl pressing, Absent‘s Towards the Void casts a shimmering plunge of cavernous doom, with swirling post-Electric Wizard guitar and echoing vocals adding to the spaciousness of its four component tracks as the Brasilia-based trio conjure atmospheric breadth to go along with their weighted lurch in opener “Ophidian Womb.” With tracks arranged shortest to longest between eight and a half and 11 minutes, “Semen Prayer,” “Funeral Sun” and “Urine” follow suit from the opener in terms of overall approach, but “Funeral Sun” speeds things up for a stretch while “Urine” lures the listener downward with a subdued opening leading to more filth-caked distortion and degenerate noise, capping with feedback because at that point what the hell matters anyway? Little question in listening why this one’s been making the rounds for over a year now. It will likely continue to do so for some time to come.

Absent on Thee Facebooks

Cursed Tongue Records webstore

 

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Høstsabbat 2019: Dunbarrow Join Lineup

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

dunbarrow

Norway’s own Dunbarrow will make a return appearance at Høstsabbat this October after playing the festival’s first edition six years ago. Last Fall, the Haugesund-based five-piece issued their second full-length, Dunbarrow II (review here), through RidingEasy Records and further demon-strated their love of atmospheres conjured through ’70s darkness and vintage tones and mood. I wouldn’t know having not been at the first Høstsabbat, but it’s easy to imagine Dunbarrow are a much different band than they were the last time out. Their self-titled debut (review here) would arrive three years later in 2016, but in 2013, they’d only had the The Crows ain’t Far Behind, which came out that year, and a prior single in 2012, so yeah, maybe a pretty formative period for the band.

By the time they got to the first record, they’d well figured it out, and the second one only built on that, so it seems likely a much different Dunbarrow will feature at Høstsabbat 2019 this October. Frankly, I’ll take it however it comes.

From the festival:

hostsabbat dunbarrow

HØSTSABBAT 2019 – DUNBARROW (NO)

Some bands are born in the wrong generation, in a different time and age… Dunbarrow has a sound taking us back to the golden 70’s, where riff, groove and melodies was what it was all about, and they execute their craft with sheer brilliance, lending ear to old-school Witchcraft and classic Pentagram equally.

Their recent album “II”, was praised by blogs and magazines all over the world, taking the band to the next level. Hailing from the coast in western Norway, DUNBARROW sat sail over the pond, and is now under the wings of the evergreen So Cal label Riding Easy Records.

These fine gentlemen took us completely by surprise when they played the first edition of Høstsabbat back in 2013, and we can’t wait to see what the years in between have done to their output. It’s a joy to welcome DUNBARROW back to the Church of Sabbat.

MUSIC
SPOTIFY: http://bit.ly/dunbarrowSF
YOUTUBE: http://bit.ly/dunbarrowYT

FESTIVAL TICKETS
http://bit.ly/HSfestivalpass

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST – HØSTSABBAT 2019
http://bit.ly/HS2019playlist

https://www.facebook.com/events/274561413173994/
https://www.facebook.com/hostsabbat/
http://hostsabbat.no/

Dunbarrow, “On Your Trail” official video

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Review & Full Album Premiere: Superlynx, New Moon

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on March 13th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Superlynx New Moon

[Click play above to stream Superlynx’s New Moon in its entirety. Album is out March 15 on Dark Essence Records.]

Atmosphere plays a huge role in what Superlynx do almost immediately on their second album, New Moon. The guitar work of Daniel Bakken works its way into Eastern-style scales in opener “Hex,” giving a meditative feel by which much of New Moon is likewise defined, patient songwriting and pacing finding bassist/vocalist Pia Isaksen, drummer/vocalist Ole Teigen (Midnattsvrede, ex-keyboard in Dødheimsgard) moving through the 10-track/46-minute runtime with a steadily increasing breadth and a tidal sense of heft, swaying back and forth as Isaksen delivers the lyrics slowly in a way that reminds alternatingly of some of Kylesa‘s later work, as on the title-track, or even Acid King in “Cold Black Sea,” but is ultimately far more ethereal in scope. “Becoming the Sea,” the payoff of “Indian Summer” and the faster-paced later cut “Scarecrow” hint at some root in extreme metal, but the brunt of New Moon is in its melodicism and its methodical, nod-setting tempos.

Released through Dark Essence Records, it is the follow-up to the Oslo-based trio’s 2016 debut, LVX, and while that album wanted nothing for tone, the fullness of the distortion Isaksen and Bakken bring to these tracks only helps further their ambient impression. They give the offering a richness that helps Superlynx in their apparent purpose of affecting the mood of their audience, which they prove more than capable of doing as New Moon dreamily plods out in cuts like the early going of “Indian Summer” and “These Children that Come at Us with Knives,” the latter of which calls to mind some of Earth‘s rolling drone but still maintains the depth of mix and character that Superlynx seem to bring to each of the tracks. Tempo shifts and turns of melodic phrasing stave off redundancy as the songs make their way past like clouds overhead on an open road — slowly, and with the feeling that they’re working on a different scale of size and time — but New Moon does seem to have a kind of unipolarity in how it functions.

That’s contrasted in the penultimate “The Groove,” on which Teigen and Isaksen share vocals in a marked departure from what surrounds while Bakken‘s guitar noodles out in the verses like The Doors on a desert trip before  solidifying for the chorus, but otherwise feels intentional, as though Superlynx are working to create a world for their material to inhabit, and to bring the listener to that place of their making. This, like the ribbon of color on the covers of their two full-lengths, is an ongoing theme in their work, but the second outing, frankly, is better at it than the first, and it would seem that part of why is down to the patience in their craft and their willingness even when the songs move — which, yes, some do, like “Indian Summer” or “Scarecrow” or even the theatrical closer “The Thickest Night” — to hold to the central contemplative atmosphere that arrives with “Hex” and provides the foundation on which the subsequent songs are built.

superlynx (Photo by Kai Simon Fredriksen)

It’s not so much about the material sounding the same as it is about individual pieces functioning toward a greater whole. The outlier, then, is “The Groove,” which precedes “The Thickest Night.” With both tracks, it’s more about their position than anything else, but I guess after the outwardly doomed catchiness of “Scarecrow” and the open feeling “Cold Black Sea” — the bassline of which seems to be in conversation with the guitar of “Breath” earlier; both touching on a rhythm that I can’t quite separate from “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” in my head — Superlynx have set themselves up for something of a departure. But the change in bringing Teigen‘s vocals in alongside those of Isaksen, which are so much a part of the overarching vibe of the record — and this is a record that is very much about its overarching vibe — feels drastic, and it’s a change without precedent on New Moon, i.e., it only happens once and it’s tucked away near the end.

Entirely possible that’s the point, of course, and Superlynx want to jar their listener ahead of finishing out with “The Thickest Night,” but if New Moon is stating its purpose in its title-track, then so much of what the band are doing is based around slow groove and a moody spirit, and after so much consistency one song into the next, it’s a move that leads one to wonder what brought them to that point, even working as well as it does. Perhaps that’s their way of exploring newer modes of expression, and if so, one can’t argue with the result, even if its arrival is a surprise. As they finish with “The Thickest Night,” the vocals seem to step forward in the mix as the guitars relinquish some of that space to swells of keyboard/synth, and a more psychedelic vibe takes hold, Isaksen‘s voice playing out in effects-laced layers over a slow march outward that builds subtly to a wash before capping with a sudden feeling of letting go.

Way back at the start of the album, in “Hex,” there’s a turn that happens at 1:46 into the total 4:43. To that point, Superlynx have built up the track (and album) from silence to a wash of distortion, and then, with just the quickest of drum fills, all three members of the band unite around a crunching, forward-directed riff that’s more aggressive in nature. In concert with the other hints of metal showcased around New Moon, it’s hard to tell if it’s a hint at past or future for them, but it’s an important component of what they do in any case, and as much as their sophomore LP is defined by its melodies and its steady, willful pacing, that undercurrent is there. But so is psychedelia, and so is doom, and so is heavy rock, so as Superlynx work to establish their sound here, it indeed is very much their own, and the stylistic elements they draw from and claim could well be the groundwork of even more worldbuilding to come.

Superlynx, “Hex” official video

Superlynx on Thee Facebooks

Superlynx on Instagram

Superlynx on Bandcamp

Dark Essence Records on Thee Facebooks

Dark Essence Records on Bandcamp

Dark Essence Records website

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Høstsabbat 2019 Adds Yuri Gagarin to Lineup

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 11th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

hostsabbat 2019 banner

I wasn’t there when Yuri Gagarin played Høstsabbat in 2015, but you can bet your ass I’ll be watching them when they take the stage — or the basement floor, which would also be awesome to have that sound engulf everyone standing there with the low ceiling as they kick into “At the Center of all Infinity” or some such righteous blast of cosmic swirl and fuzz — for Høstsabbat 2019 in October. The Swedish space rockers have a sound like ore mined from comets and they meld an exploratory sensibility with a charted course that lets you know somewhere in the midst of all that chaos there’s a plan at work. Hypnotisch churn and sprawling guitar give way to engulfing heft and atmospheric drones as the instrumentalist outfit trance out their particular angle on bliss, and the assembled masses at Høstsabbat, myself included, will count ourselves lucky to be along for the trip.

Universe on.

Fest announcement follows:

hostsabbat 2019 yuri gagarin

HØSTSABBAT 2019 – YURI GAGARIN (SWE)

SPACE > EARTH

This Friday’s announcement is a band who knows how to handle the rotten existence of the average human being, wandering around our endlessly doomed planet called the Earth. They leave it. Easy.

Luckily for all Sabbathians, they have room in their shuttle when we once again shall be guided by the mindblowing Yuri Gagarin on our way to a colorful cosmos. A trip cleansed from fear and hatred, a trip manifested by their locked down grooves and infinite sounds, a trip that leaves us floating aimlessly amongst planets and stardust.

The Swedes in YURI GAGARIN is a band we have been wanting to invite back since their last feedback ended in 2015, and it’s with huge anticipation and joy we are welcoming them to church in October!

SPACE ?

MUSIC
SPOTIFY: http://bit.ly/yurigagarinSP
YOUTUBE: http://bit.ly/yurigagarinYT

FESTIVAL TICKETS
http://bit.ly/HSfestivalpass

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST – HØSTSABBAT 2019
http://bit.ly/HS2019playlist

https://www.facebook.com/events/274561413173994/
https://www.facebook.com/hostsabbat/
http://hostsabbat.no/

Yuri Gagarin, At the Center of all Infinity (2015)

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Høstsabbat 2019: Yatra Added to Lineup

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 6th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

hostsabbat 2019 banner

I like that the latest update from Høstsabbat starts with, “Have you read any heavy music blogs lately?” Shit, I hope not. Save yourself. And your money. Try to make it through some too-old-dude’s run-on sentences about how this or that band riffs? Surely you have better things to do with your time.

Cha cha cha.

They’re right, though. Yatra, for whom the cliche “burst onto the scene” genuinely fits, released their debut album, Death Ritual (discussed here) in January through Grimoire Records and have been all over the place ever since. Some bands take a while to catch on. Some bands don’t. Yatra would seem to have made an immediate impression, and fairly enough so.

They’ve got tour dates already announced for this month, so I guess we’ll be keeping eyes open for a Fall European run to be announced. Always possible they’re just flying over for this show, but somehow I have the feeling they’re going to be in demand in more than just Oslo.

Still, as the first announcement for them on European soil, it’s a special moment. Kudos to the band, and to Høstsabbat 2019 for having its ears to the (under)ground.

Fest announcement follows:

hostsabbat 2019 yatra

HØSTSABBAT 2019 – YATRA (US)

Have you read any heavy music blogs lately? If you have, there’s no chance in the world you’ve missed the presence of the Americans in YATRA. Their brand new album “Death Ritual” has been on everyone’s lips, taking over news feeds completely. Rightfully so.

From the starting sounds, which recalls the soothing sounds of Thebes, by OM, there’s no turning back. YATRA play some kind of old school, almost blackened, stoner doom. It’s terrifying, with a sound nodding to Goatsnake as well as Sleep, but with a much grimmer output.

This is a booking we are very proud of, since we’re certain YATRA will leave marks in our community for years to come.

Please give hand to YATRA, as they visit Norway and Oslo for the first time. Hail!!

MUSIC // YATRA
SPOTIFY: http://bit.ly/yatraSP
YOUTUBE: http://bit.ly/yatraYT

FESTIVAL TICKETS
http://bit.ly/HSfestivalpass

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST – HØSTSABBAT 2019
http://bit.ly/HS2019playlist

https://www.facebook.com/events/274561413173994/
https://www.facebook.com/hostsabbat/
http://hostsabbat.no/

Yatra, Death Ritual (2019)

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Høstsabbat 2019 Adds All-Norway Stage at Second Venue; Barren Womb, Magmakammer & More to Play

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 28th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

hostsabbat 2019 banner

Since its first iteration, the Oslo-based fest Høstsabbat has made a point to be supportive of the native-Norwegian underground. This coming October, they’ll up the stakes in that regard by adding a whole new stage and venue to the proceedings. For a show that takes place in a spot that already has two stages and, well, there just happens to be a third right across the street that has another one, it’s a natural kind of growth to happen. Barren WombGolden CoreSuperlynxMagmakammerOrsak:OsloAcârashKanaan, Astrosaur and Subnoir will hold sway over the new stage and in addition being a badass homage to the festival’s home city and country — though I wouldn’t have minded seeing SÂVER added again now that their record will be out — and while I’m not sure how the timing will work out with the two stages back at the Kulturkirken Jakob, that’s a chance for someone like me coming from outside or even for someone from Norway unfamiliar, to get a lesson in what the scene there is all about. It’s an opportunity.

Announcement from the fest follows:

hostsabbat 2019 norway stage 2

As Høstsabbat has been growing over the years, since our humble start in 2013, our intentional focus on showcasing the Norwegian underground has lost turf to bigger acts from foreign countries. It’s been super fun to be able to book top shelf bands from different corners of the world, but it’s no secret that our focus on the always brimming scene in our native country has lost ground.

Fear no more!

Høstsabbat 2019 will include a third stage, at the awesome bar and stage at Verkstedet Bar, literally a 30-second walk from the church. This stage will consist of Norwegian bands ONLY. After months of planning, we feel we have captured the essence of bands, set to break through to the next level. It’s hard to describe the quality and diverse impact of this stage, and we would like to thank all the bands for making this vision become reality.

It’s a tremendous joy to welcome these nine acts to Høstsabbat 2019, illustrated on a stunning poster by the incredibly talented Trine Grimm (Trine Grimm Tattoo), who is also set to curate the art program this year, alongside our long-time companion Linda K Røed!

There you go, Boom!

Bands:
Barren Womb
Golden Core
Aca?rash
Superlynx
Magmakammer
Astrosaur
Orsak:Oslo
SUBNOIR
Kanaan – Band

FESTIVAL TICKETS
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SPOTIFY PLAYLIST – HØSTSABBAT 2019
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Orbiter Premiere “To the Crows” from Resist, Submit, Repeat

Posted in audiObelisk on February 27th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

orbiter (Photo by Olya Lavrik)

Oslo-based heavy rockers Orbiter are set to make their full-length debut on March 1 — two days from now — with Resist, Submit, Repeat on Negative Vibe Records. The offering runs a brisk 28 minutes, and for most of its seven tracks, the operative word there is “runs.” The album’s promo materials, part of which you can see below, tag Clutch and Motörhead as key influences, and listening to the sprinting verse of opener “To the Crows” give way to a more weighted groove in the chorus, I can hardly disagree, but there’s a metallic underpinning of chug in the bridge of “To the Crows” before the gallop resumes that not only foreshadows what will cap the record and serve as its crescendo in the mammoth stomp of the instrumental “Voyage,” but hints toward some of the aggression heard in punkish centerpiece “Dave” or in the brisk 2:44 rush of “Fratican Shitty,” which would seem to be about more than a downer tourist experience. It’s only hard to say for sure because by the time you’ve caught up to the hook, the track is already en route to beating you over the head with the next verse.

Even the vocal patterning there, though, could be argued as derived from Clutch, but that comes more forward in mid-paced swing-rockers like “Six Line” as guitarist Kim Rune Johansen complements the riffing with a gruff, dudely shout that stays on rhythm and ultimately helps set the brash mood of Resist, Submit, Repeat on the whole. In the only two songs that top five minutes long, “Misery Season” and “Mt. Fuzzo,” there’s a little more room to flesh parts out, but that dynamic serves Orbiter well — particularly as “Mt. Fuzzo” directly precedes “Fratican Shitty” — and the overall burl factor is well met by Ivan Reigstad‘s bass and Pål G Sivertzen‘s drumming, which provide the bounce that makes cuts like “Six Line” and “Misery Season” the highlights that they are, as well as being a bit of a drawback from the all-go spirit of the faster material. It’s not an unfamiliar blend on the whole, but Orbiter bend it effectively to suit their purposes, and the chug they dig into periodically throughout becomes a kind of secret weapon waiting to be fully unleashed in the finale.

The stated theme of the album is the process of coping with — or at least losing to — one’s demons, and whether that’s substance abuse, mental illness, etc., it’s fair enough ground for them to trod. Still, listening to the fueled shuffle of “Dave,” I wouldn’t call Resist, Submit, Repeat a downer in the slightest. Its brazen take hints at future melodicism in their sound and it’s less than a half-hour of absolutely pretense-free, high-energy riff-led heavy rock. There’s plenty to get down with if you’re up for it, and really, the bass alone on the closer is right there in gotta-hear status. I’m a sucker for rumble anyway, but that’s the good stuff.

Before that, however, there’s there punch in the face of “To the Crows,” which you can hear premiering on the player below, followed by the aforementioned PR wire info.

Have at it, and please enjoy:

Negative Vibe Records has announced the March 1st album release of Resist, Submit, Repeat. This is the debut full-length from Norwegian muck-rock merchants, Orbiter. Composed of Kim Rune Johansen (guitar/vocals), Ivan Reigstad (bass) and Pål G Sivertzen (drums) this trio splits the difference between the stoner grooves of bands like Clutch and the amphetamine riff fury of Motorhead.

In the three years between their debut EP Crooked and the new full-length the band has become a super-tight live fixture on the Oslo music scene. Practicing and refining some of the new tunes through years of rehearsal and performances. Johansen said of the difference between releases “there’s a filthy rawness to much of the music which we draw in from the nature around us, however the energy is much more refined on this release, the riffs are bigger and the production is huge!”

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