Friday Full-Length: Raging Slab, Raging Slab

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 2nd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Raging Slab, Raging Slab (1989)

If you’re the sort of person who likes a clean, clear narrative to your rock and roll history, you’ll probably want to avoid Raging Slab. An anomaly if ever there was one, here was a band based out of New York City playing Southern-style heavy boogie rock… who released their first album in 1987. And then signed to a major label! If you can make any sense of it or put it into any kind of discernible context, go for it. It’s almost like Raging Slab were sent back from the future to disrupt the timeline, is how out of place they were for their day and age. And yet, listening to their 1989 self-titled — released by RCA Records as the follow-up to ’87’s charmingly-dubbed Assmaster debut — one can hear flashes of the era in the semi-metallic “Shiny Mama” (on which Ray Gillen provides backing vocals) and in the post-Motörhead freight-train progression of “Get off My Jollies.” But at its core, Raging Slab is a work of ’70s loyalism that was as much ahead of its time as it was behind it. The band, founded by guitarists Greg Strzempka (also vocals and songwriting) and Elyse Steinman, here featured bassist Alec Morton, lead guitarist Mark Middleton and drummers Tony Scaglione (everything but “Get off My Jollies”) and Steve “Doc Killdrums” Wacholz (“Get off My Jollies”) — though credited in the liner and in the cover photography one finds Bob Pantella, who’d go on to join Monster Magnet, The Atomic Bitchwax, etc. — no doubt earned some sideways glances in the heyday of glam, but in hindsight, it’s just as easy to read their work as boldly defying both the mainstream and the underground of its day.

To wit, the aforementioned glam. Imagine Raging Slab coming out the same year as Mötley Crüe‘s Dr. Feelgood. Sure, there was plenty of metal to be had — the NWOBHM had arguably crested some years earlier, but thrash had by then hit its stride as America’s major contribution to a heavy metal aesthetic. Doom festered in the likes of Saint VitusThe Obsessed, and Cathedral, but while Molly Hatchet and ZZ Top were still around, they were more Southern than heavy, and Raging Slab were more heavy than they were metal. And elsewhere in the underground, the likes of Earth, the Melvins and Nirvana were solidifying what would in a couple years break out internationally as grunge. Raging Slab didn’t fit there either. In a self-written 1996 bio, they called themselves, “TOO hard for country and western fans, TOO slow for thrash fans, TOO cerebral for hard rock fans and TOO rock and roll for alternative fans.” All true. The self-titled tells that story in cuts like “Geronimo” and “Bent for Silver,” which are too brazen in their hooks to be chic in an underground sense and too weighted to really be pop or country rock. Hell, to listen to opener “Don’t Dog Me,” it’s a cut that today would be right at home in the Ripple Music lineup. 27 years ago, I guess it wasn’t so easy to place.

However they wound up on a label like RCA, they did, and they’d go on to work with Rick Rubin‘s Def American/American Recordings on subsequent outings, Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert (1993) and Sing Monkey Sing! (1996), but in the meantime, a generational shift and the arrival of bands like Corrosion of Conformity — whose Deliverance came out five years after Raging Slab, in 1994 — working under a Southern heavy influence kept wider commercial success elusive, and Raging Slab faded for a time. The turn of the century found them returned to activity on Tee Pee Records with 2001’s The Dealer and the next year’s Pronounced Eat Shit, but apart from a compilation appearance here and there — they notably took on Grand Funk Railroad‘s “We’re an American Band” for Small Stone‘s first installment of Sucking the ’70s in 2002 — that would be their swansong. Strzempka found a home in Sweden’s Backdraft, and there were rumors of another Raging Slab resurgence and a new album as part of that, but a decade later, it’s yet to surface.

Never say never in rock and roll though. If you dig the self-titled, it was reissued in ’09 on Rock Candy Records, and Assmaster also saw a re-press in 2013 through Cherry Red with a bunch of bonus material, including the True Death EP from 1989.

Whether you know this one or not, I hope you enjoy.

Man, this week can’t fuck off fast enough to suit my tastes. Like here’s the week fucking off as fast as it possibly can and here’s me standing with a stopwatch shaking my head going, “Not even close, yo.”

Awful.

Let’s be optimistic together. 2016’s almost over, and we don’t yet know what fresh, astounding lows the New Year will bring.

Hey, we got over 125 entries in the first day of the Top 20 of 2016 Year-End Poll. That legitimately ruled. Made my week, actually. I was nervous. If you contributed a list, thanks. If not yet, please do. Any help sharing the link is also greatly valued.

In the notes for next week:

Mon: Album stream for Leafy and a Year of the Goat video premiere.
Tue: Albinö Rhinö album stream and the new Lord Loud video.
Wed: A list of 10 album covers that kicked ass in 2016. Because art is fun and talking about it is a fun way to kick off list season.
Thu: A review of The Second Coming of Heavy, Chapter 4.
Fri: Track stream from a Denver band I’m not sure I’m allowed yet to name.

Gonna be a good one. This week should’ve been a good one too. The problem is me. I’m the problem.

It’s okay though. I’ve been down this road before. Gonna spend the next couple days drinking coffee leisurely, playing Final Fantasy XV and hanging out with Slevin, who’s coming north for a visit. It’ll be nice to see him. It always is.

I sincerely hope your week was better than mine and that your weekend is no less stellar. Be safe and have fun, and please make time to check out the forum and the radio stream.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

Tags: , , , ,

Spotlights Announce Spiders EP Due Dec. 9

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 21st, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

spotlights

Brooklyn heavy post-rock duo Spotlights made their full-length debut earlier this year on Crowquill Records with Tidals, an album that earned them a support slot on a summer tour for Deftones and Refused — because the ’90s — and considerable acclaim besides. I’ll actually have it in the next Quarterly Review, which will be kind of a stuff-I-should’ve-already-written-about wrap-up for 2016, hopefully at the end of next month, between Xmas and New Year’s. You know, when the rest of the universe is spending time with family and relaxing and deciding what promises they’re going to make to themselves and break in a month. Wow. Shit got dark quick there. Apologies. I’m sure we’ll all keep our promises.

Though some of us are still just catching up to it, Spotlights are moving past their first album already with a new EP titled Spiders that will be out Dec. 9. It’s got three tracks, an original, a Mew cover that’s streaming below, and a remix by Aaron Harris, formerly of Isis, and some blinding cover art. The PR wire sent info along for your perusal and mine.

And really, 2017’s gonna be a good year. I’d ask how much worse it could possibly get, but I think we all know the answer to that question.

Here goes:

spotlights-spiders

SPOTLIGHTS: dream-rockers resurface with “Spiders” EP

Heavy dream-rockers Spotlights resurface with a new 3-song EP, Spiders, to be released December 9th.

The Brooklyn-based married couple made waves earlier this year with the release of debut full-length Tidals and a summer US tour supporting Deftones and Refused.

New EP Spiders consists of a reworking of an older Spotlights song, a cover of a song by Danish band Mew, and a remix of one of Tidals’ tracks, by former Isis drummer Aaron Harris.

December 9th, Spiders will be available directly from the band in the US, in digital and CD formats. Spiders and Tidals will both see a UK/European release via Plastic Head Distribution.

Tracklist:
1) A Box of Talking Heads
2) She Spider (Mew)
3) Joseph (Aaron Harris remix)

Spotlights is:
Sarah Quintero – Bass/Guitar/Vocals
Mario Quintero – Guitar/Synths/Vocals
Josh Cooper – Drums (Live)

https://www.facebook.com/spotlightsband
https://twitter.com/Spotlightsband
http://spotlights.bandcamp.com/
http://crowquillrecords.com/

Tags: , , , , ,

Thralldom to Release Time Will Bend into Horror Nov. 11

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 2nd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

thralldom-photo-by-dp-demis-photography

Don’t count on the streaming track below to speak for the whole of Thralldom‘s upcoming Time Will Bend into Horror full-length, but even as just three-plus minutes to go on, “Chronovisions” gives a glimpse of raw black metal that seeks to push beyond stylistic confines. In true black metal form, the project, spearheaded by Ryan Lipynsky of Unearthly Trance and Jared Turinsky, hasn’t been active in a decade, but will release Time Will Bend into Horror digitally through Ritual Productions on Nov. 11 and it comes with many elaborate aesthetic comparisons, from dark electronica to impressionist mastery.

The following came in off the PR wire:

thralldom-time-will-bend-into-horror

Ritual Productions Initiate Thralldom

It is with immense pleasure to initiate Thralldom onto the Ritual Productions roster and announce the digital release date on November 11th of their first rite in ten years, entitled Time Will Bend Into Horror.

Purveyors of the occultist realm may recognise the name from years long passed, being something of an enigma amongst underground metal circles. Indeed, Thralldom have now returned with their first offering in over a decade, consisting once again of Ryan Lipynsky aka Killusion (Unearthly Trance, Serpentine Path, The Howling Wind) and Jared Turinsky aka Jaldagar. Although the alchemists remain the same, this is a new incarnation for the project: Thralldom 3.0.

Textures and tones from their ancient demo days and the experimental blackened noise for which they garnered acclaim melds with their new mentality which focuses more on the nuances of riff, drum and guitar interlacing. Devoid of genre limitations and gimmicks, never bounded by time or space, Thralldom refuse to tread paths gone before on Time Will Bend Into Horror. The six tracks transverse and re-morph sonic terrain, with licks of black, thrash, doom, old-school metal, industrial, noise and dark electronica but never exclusively, always experimental. You’ll find your subconscious entranced, limbs paralysed from the morose stillness before being ensnared into a blistering headbanging frenzy all whilst your face mirrors that of Edvard Munch’s ‘The Scream’. You will not know when your corporeality or psychosis will manifest or seize in its consciousness during the album and that is why the intricacies found on Time Will Bend Into Horror is an alchemical abstract art that amalgamates and subverts the mind/body dichotomy through its evocation of fear, pensiveness, horror.

TIME WILL BEND INTO HORROR TRACK LIST
1) Cosmic Chains
2) Chronovisions
3) Stars and Graves
4) The Corpse Of The Radar Towers Over All
5) Dark Grey Mist
6) Transmission

Thralldom are essential elements in the dark arts. Never fearful of exploring uncharted territory, they trust and learn from the chaos transmuting this into instinctual soundwaves. Time Will Bend Into Horror evokes a variety of moods through its fractured fluidity ultimately making this a magikally compelling listen. After 10 years away, it is now time for Thralldom’s subliminal, subversive and sinister sonics to re-enter the atmosphere and align latent areas of your psyche. We invite you to join this séance.

https://thralldomthralldom.blogspot.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/thralldom
www.ritualproductions.net
www.facebook.com/ritualproductionsuk
www.twitter.com/ritualmusic

Thralldom, “Chronovisions”

Tags: , , , , ,

Battle of Mice to Release All Your Sympathy’s Gone Discography 2LP Dec. 23

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 27th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

battle-of-mice-vinyl

Brooklyn post-metallers Battle of Mice had three releases out between 2006 and 2008. There was their stunning debut full-length, A Day of Nights (discussed here), which in my opinion continues to stand as one of the finest outings of its genre, offering a rare emotional resonance often cast aside in favor of ultra-cerebral chug and ambient interplay, as well as a preceding split with Red Sparowes and Made out of Babies and a following 2008 split with Jesu. That’s it. The band came to an unceremonious finish, and they were done. No talk of a reunion. No farewell show. No second album. Nothing. It was a cold ending.

Belgian imprint Consouling Sounds gives Battle of Mice their (over)due with All Your Sympathy’s Gone: The Complete Recordings, a 2LP that takes its title from the first lyric of A Day of Nights opener “The Lamb and the Labrador” and will be out Dec. 23. The package, which you can see above, is available now to preorder and for me, I’m just happy to have the excuse to revisit the band’s work, which though it’s a shock to think it’s been a decade since it came out, remains as powerful as it was when it was first released.

Info follows. Don’t miss this one:

battle-of-mice-all-your-sympathys-gone

It’s with tremendous pride we can announce the preorder for “All Your Sympathy’s Gone | The Complete Recordings”, collecting all of Battle of Mice’s music on a lavish gatefold double vinyl set.

It has been 10 years that Battle of Mice released their groundbreaking album “A Day of Nights”. The band, consisting of Josh Graham (A Storm of Light, IIVII, ex- Neurosis, ex- Red Sparowes), Julie Christmas (ex- Made Out of Babies), Joel Hamilton (Book Of Knots), Tony Maimone (Book of Knots, Pere Ubu (Official)) and Joe Tomino (Fugees, Dub Trio, Peeping Tom), was heralded as a post-metal supergroup. Battle of Mice unfortunately existed only a few years, but their musical legacy is tremendous. The album, previously released on Neurot Recordings, never saw a vinyl release. For this 10th anniversary, Consouling Sounds wants to pay homage to this seminal album by releasing it on vinyl for the very first time, augmented with the music from their split album, collecting all of Battle of Mice’s music on a lavish 2LP set.

The music has been especially remastered by Doug Henderson (also Swans, The Necks, Insect Ark, …), who revisited the original master recordings for this vinyl reissue.

To commemorate this special occasion, none other than Dehn Sora designed a special shirt. You can get this shirt from size S to XXL as a stand-alone order, or you can buy it as a package deal together with the 2LP.

Preorder now for a December 23 release here: http://consouling.be/album/battle-mice-sympathys-gone-complete-recordings/

https://www.facebook.com/battleofmice/
https://www.facebook.com/ConsoulingSounds/
http://consouling.be/

Battle of Mice, A Day of Nights (2006)

Tags: , , , , ,

Members of The Brought Low and Kings Destroy Team up for The Rama Lama Fa Fa Fas Tribute to MC5

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 24th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

The tribute show is an essential part of the rock and roll Halloween experience — bands essentially dressing up as other bands, if only in sound — and kudos to the guys from NYC trio The Brought Low for teaming up with Carl Porcaro from Kings Destroy and Sweet Diesel‘s Nat Murray (of course The Brought Low have their own connections to that outfit as well) for hooking up a gig and not just doing a set of Misfits songs like probably hundreds of other acts along the Eastern Seaboard will be doing that weekend. On Oct. 28, performing as The Rama Lama Fa Fa Fas, the five-piece will hit The Gutter in Williamsburg to pay due homage to the MC5. Maybe not the kind of thing I’d always post about, but given the personnel involved and the thought of how killer a time this one would actually be to attend, you’ll get no argument out of me.

And I gotta be honest with you, I could use another The Brought Low album. It’s been a surprisingly long six years since their Third Record (review here) came out in 2010 on Small Stone, and as early as 2012, there was discussion of a fourth, but nothing has yet materialized. Would be awfully nice, is all I’m saying.

While I go back and put on their last one again, here’s the highly exclamatory show info for The Rama Lama Fa Fa Fas this Friday:

the-rama-lama-fa-fa-fas-poster

The Rama Lama Fa Fa Fas – MC5 Tribute @ Gutter

The Rama Lama Fa Fa Fas is The Brought Low and Carl from Kings Destroy on second guitar and Nat Murray from Sweet Diesel on lead vocals doing MC5 covers. We have a show at The Gutter in Brooklyn Friday, October 28th. Here’s the info:

Friday, October 28
The Gutter Bowling and Fine Brews
200 N 14th St, Brooklyn, New York 11249

Brothers and sisters!!!!!!!
It’s time to see a sea of hands!!!!!!
It’s time to kick up some noise!!!!!!
It’s time to get down with it this Halloween weekend and I want to know…
Are you ready to testify?!!!!!!
Are you ready to testify?!!!!!!

I give you a testimonial….

The Rama Lama Fa Fa Fas!!!!!!!!!!
A musical tribute to the MC5 with members of Breakdown, The Brought Low, Killing Time, Kings Destroy and Sweet Diesel!!!!!!!

Join us at The Gutter Friday, October 28th to kick out the jams motherfuckers!!!!!!!!!

Flyer by Steve Louk.

https://www.facebook.com/events/686951801480997/
https://www.facebook.com/thebroughtlow/

MC5, “Rama Lama Fa Fa Fa”

Tags: , , , ,

Begotten Stream Two Lost Tracks Recorded in 2001

Posted in audiObelisk on October 19th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

begotten

Just how far ahead of their time were New York riffers Begotten? Take a listen for yourself to these two lost cuts from 15 years ago and find out. I’ve gone on at some length over the last couple years about the effect that a changing social media landscape and generational shift has had on a period of heavy rock in the late-’90s and early-’00s, so I’ll spare (most of) that, but like NYC compatriots in Atomic Number 76, Kreisor, Puny Human, M-Squad and a host of others — The Brought Low might be considered survivors — the trio Begotten were a prime example of a band about to have their time who found it cut short. Tracked in 2000 and released in 2001, their self-titled debut was the final CD to come from the groundbreaking Man’s Ruin Records, and like many of that imprint’s acts — Suplecs, MassCavity, etc. — they were left wondering what to do next when label honcho and design artist Frank Kozik pulled the plug. The record, a quality offering of post-Sleep tonal weight with flashes of New Yorker edge and more psychedelic impulses, never got the push it deserved, and they never did another. End of story.

Yes and no. The MySpace era and many of the acts who thrived in the day may have dissipated, but in the case of Begotten, before they went their separate ways, they took part in what seems to be numerous studio and taped rehearsal sessions after the album came out, and it’s from those that “Apache” and “Nomad” come. The two songs — other versions of which you can actually still find archived on their MySpace page, linked below — are presented here in somewhat raw fashion, but give credence to what I’m talking about as regards those years in general, which is to say that if it showed up in my inbox today, the work of guitarist/vocalist Matthew Anselmo, bassist/vocalist Amanda Topaz and drummer Rob Sefcik — the latter of whom would resurface years later in Brooklyn’s Kings Destroy — would fit right in.

Insert your favorite cliche about the old being the new here, but listen to Begotten lumber their way through “Apache” in the context of what bands like Monolord are doing now and I think you’ll hear the adage is easily applied. In tone and the emergent jammed-out feel of “Apache,” as well as in the more intense initial chug that follows in “Nomad” (Sefcik‘s drum intro reminding a bit of Kings Destroy‘s “Stormbreak” from their second album) before that song nears the halfway mark and gloriously spaces itself out, ne’er to return, Begotten‘s emphasis on swing and laid back heft seems prescient in hindsight.

My understanding is that Begotten might start jamming together again at some point, but whether or not that comes to fruition, the three-piece left behind a quality curio in their self-titled, the value of which extends way beyond its tertiary trivia, and “Apache” and “Nomad” show there was clearly a progression underway in their sound that, to-date, remains unrealized. Seems to me that in another 10-15 years — maybe sooner; things move quickly these days — when this era of heavy rock gets mined for reissues the way releases from 1968-1975 have been, Begotten will be more than ready for a second look, whatever else their future as a group may hold.

Sefcik offers some comment on the tracks under the player below.

Please enjoy:

Rob Sefcik on “Apache” and “Nomad”:

So if I remember correctly we went in to record these because we felt we were really hitting our stride. I’m not sure if we had any intention of releasing them at the time but they were definitely a reflection f what we were going for — music that had weight but also an earthy spirit and a sense of freedom. Keeping things super heavy but maintaining a certain loose, jammy vibe is always easier said than done, but we felt like we were getting there with these tunes.

The consensus is that they were recorded late spring/early summer 2001, about a year or so after the record was out. There was a pretty good amount of other material, at least an album or two’s worth. They were recorded in Manhattan but in true stoner rock fashion no one can remember the name…

We definitely have some other recorded material that we have not been able to locate, but I’m sure it will rear its head. For Amanda, these songs for her personally were, ‘an expression of the sublime beauty of the gut-wrenching agony of her existence at the time.’ I was just tying to have a good time, ALL the time, ha.

Begotten on Thee Facebooks

Begotten on MySpace (yup)

Tags: , , ,

Kings Destroy Touring Europe in Nov. with The Skull

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 15th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Brooklyn’s Kings Destroy will head to Europe this fall. The genre-defiant five-piece will head overseas with Chicago’s The Skull for the first time since the release of their 2015 self-titled third album (review here), which was released by War Crime Recordings, who, in the interest of full disclosure, also pressed up my book. I’ll confess I was invited to go along with Kings Destroy on this tour as I did twice in the US circa 2014, but the basic fact of the matter is those kinds of things are way easier to do when you’re out of work, which, at the moment, I’m not. Unless I get canned between now and then. If that happens, I’m fucking there.

The Obelisk All-Dayer veterans will be keeping good company one way or another, both in touring with The Skull and in bringing aboard none other than the Mayor of Boston Heavy, Darryl Shepard (Kind, The Scimitar, Hackman, Milligram, Blackwolfgoat, so many others) himself — to play bass no less. Shepard had a few words about filling the low-end position this time out, and you’ll find those, Kings Destroy‘s announcement, the dates, and the stream of the self-titled below, because I’m thorough like that when I like a band this much.

Have at you:

kings-destroy

Excited to announce that Kings Destroy will be joining The Skull for the majority of their British/European tour in November! Some additional German KD-only dates TBA. See you on the road!

Darryl Shepard on touring with Kings Destroy:

When Kings Destroy ask you to play bass for them on their European tour, you say yes. I’m very honored and excited to be joining these guys on bass for their tour with The Skull in November.

The Skull & Kings Destroy Nov. 2016 European tour:
03.11.2016 GB London @ Koli’s Night Club
04.11.2016 GB Bristol @ Exchange
05.11.2016 GB Milton Keynes @ Crauford Arms
06.11.2016 GB Birmingham @ The Rainbow
07.11.2016 NL Tilburg @ Little Devil
08.11.2016 NL Utrecht @ DBs
09.11.2016 DE Karlsruhe @ Jubez
10.11.2016 AT Vienna Doom Over Vienna Festival @ Viper
12.11.2016 NL Nijverdal @ Cult-Art Shop
13.11.2016 NL Drachten @ Iduna
14.11.2016 DE Wiesbaden @ Schlachthof
15.11.2016 DE Kassel @ Schlachthof
16.11.2016 DE Hamburg @ Hafenklang

https://www.facebook.com/KingsDestroy/
http://www.kingsdestroy.com/
https://kingsdestroy.bandcamp.com/
http://warcrimerecordings.com/
https://www.facebook.com/WarCrimeRecordings

Kings Destroy, Kings Destroy (2015)

Tags: , , , ,

The Obelisk All-Dayer — THANK YOU!

Posted in The Obelisk Presents on August 22nd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

the-obelisk-all-dayer-thanks

I honestly can’t remember the last time I was so tired. Pure physical and mental exhaustion. By the end of the day I could barely stand up, keep my head up, or down one last cup of coffee while watching Mars Red Sky close out the show. It’s been three days. I’m still not sure I have the mental faculties to write this post.

I hereby dub the first-ever The Obelisk All-Dayer a success.

The day started with The Patient Mrs.’ car breaking down on I-95 in Connecticut on the way south to Brooklyn and continued through flash floods, the first two bands running late (both got there on time, but my nerves were already frayed from being late myself), my camera breaking – again – during Funeral Horse, Death Alley blowing a tire on their way up from Philly, and so on, but there were tacos, the day ultimately ran on time, and everybody killed.

Absolutely killed. I mean it. Front to back. What a show.

From Heavy Temple bringing it for an early 2:30 start through Mars Red Sky dipping back to their first record for a rendition of “Strong Reflection” that nearly brought a tear to my eye, and everything in between. King Buffalo? Funeral Horse? Fucking EYE? Kings Destroy? Snail? Death Alley’s absolute ownership of the room? There wasn’t a dud in the bunch.

Most importantly, it seemed like everybody there had a good time. The tacos went. We wound up with about 170 people in the door, not counting bands and guests, and with the professionalism of the Saint Vitus Bar staff, the show ran smoothly the whole time, changeovers were easy, and my sincere hope is that everyone who came felt welcome, because they absolutely were.

On that note, I’ll say that I’m not going to review the show. Just doesn’t feel right. But I did want to say thank you to a few people who helped make the day so incredibly special.

First to The Patient Mrs., who not only handled money at the end of the night, but sold posters and patches, kept me sane as we stood on the side of the highway and waited for the tow truck, reminded me to eat, and got me that aforementioned last cup of coffee to get me through the last part of the show. She was there (almost) the whole day and it was deeply meaningful to me to have her around.

Thanks to Walter Roadburn, who left the comforts of home to come and co-DJ the afterparty, sat in traffic with The Patient Mrs. and I on the trip from Boston to Connecticut, Connecticut to Brooklyn, and back again. The time we got to spend talking about music, about what he does with his festival, and his insights on the show are memories that I imagine I will continue to treasure for as long as I can remember anything at all. Highlight of the weekend, without question. And thanks to Esther, who convinced him to come.

Thanks to David Castillo, George Souleidis, Sound Guy Jeff and the staff at the Saint Vitus Bar, which leaves absolutely nothing to question as to why it has the reputation it has. The generosity they showed in welcoming the All-Dayer into their rightly-hallowed space, the accommodation of the weird schedule, and just the sheer slog of the hours put in – all handled with professionalism beyond enviable. Other venues should aspire to run such a ship. It was staggering to see it from the end of someone organizing a show. Thank you so much.

Thank you to Steve Murphy for the endless, thoroughly unjustified belief in my being able to pull this whole thing off, for the tacos and for the support across the board. Thank you for your friendship, your kindness, and for your threat to print up bootleg Obelisk t-shirts to give away at random. I hope that works out.

Thanks to the bands. Mars Red Sky coming from France to play, Death Alley from the Netherlands, Snail from the West Coast, Kings Destroy giving New York due representation with a special set – “Planet XXY?” who knew? – EYE from Ohio, Funeral Horse from Houston, King Buffalo from Rochester and Heavy Temple from Philly. And to Walter and Adam Otracina for helming the afterparty. Whether they were coming from near or far, it really felt like everybody put something extra into the show and I was continually humbled and blown away by what I saw and heard all day and into the night. People loaning each other gear, making adjustments on the fly, starting and ending on time, everything came together better than I could’ve hoped, and it was just wonderful to see. I am deeply grateful.

Thanks to Jaime Traba for recording the audio of the sets. More on that hopefully soon. Thanks to Frank Huang for capturing video. Steve Truglio, Randy Blood, Harry Booth and others for getting photos. Like I said, my camera died, so knowing that there were plenty of others around was a great comfort.

Thanks to Skillit for the amazing poster and logo design, and to Dave from Made in Brooklyn for printing the patches. Thanks to my family, Suze Wright, Andy Wright and Rob Jones, for coming and helping sell merch. Thanks to Slevin and Ralph. Thanks to Liz and Dave from Earsplit and Becky Laverty for the plugs. Thanks to Postman Dan for buying tickets even though he couldn’t make it. Thanks to Randy and Laura Blood, Juan Lopez, Jen Hendrix-Johnson, Kenny Sehgal, Phil Moon, Adam Sawford, Nico Liengme and Laurel Jane May, Earl Walker Lundy, Seibert Lowe, Paul John Shaft, Lisa Hass, Melanie Streko, Ron, Jill Lavilette, Brian Schmidt, Ross Colombo, Alex Jakstas, Natasha Padilla, Tad Proshansky, Zack Kurland, Greg Aramini, and many, many others who came out, everyone who had a kind word about the site, the band selection, my book, everything. I’m quite sure I’ll add to this list as I regain even my usual limited use of my mental faculties, but this is for starters and please know that whether you were there in-person or if you shared a link or saw a post about it and liked it or bought tickets in advance or just read the site generally. Thank you. Thank you all so much. Thank you.

Thank you.

I’m going to take a couple weeks and really think about whether this is something I want to do again, but if I do, I know it won’t be an annual thing. Whatever happens moving forward, I want you to know how unbelievable this night was for me and I hope for everyone who attended as well. One more time, thank you.

I don’t have photos of my own, Steve Truglio was kind enough to send me shots of each band who played, and you’ll find them after the jump.

Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,