Maryland Doom Fest 2020 Canceled

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

MARYLAND DOOM FEST 2020 banner

It would’ve been too good to be true, and yet somehow completely in character for gujarati essay online phd thesis ultrasonic studies persuasive essay prompts Maryland Doom Fest that even with the rest of the world falling apart around it, the doom persisted in 2020. I don’t know what shape the festival would’ve taken, but after an initial rescheduling in May that would’ve made the multi-day event take place over Halloween weekend for the first time — a fitting timing, if chillier than June in Frederick, MD — it’s been called off altogether due to the ongoing restrictions placed on venues as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. If you, like me, were hoping this one would pull it out, this is a bummer you probably have been or at least should have been expecting.

Next weekend, professional writers What Do My Clothes Say About Me Essay guide to writing the perfect essay homework help martin luther king Maryland Doom Fest will present a birthday celebration for go now - receive a 100% authentic, plagiarism-free paper you could only think about in our paper writing assistance Best HQ academic services Scott “Wino” Weinrich that will be headlined by the man himself playing acoustic and feature a host of others from the Chesapeake region, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. I’ve included the link for that below, just to have something positive in here, and there will reportedly be a Halloween thing as well on a limited basis that the details haven’t been announced for yet.

It goes without saying that this needed to happen, but it’s still hard to take. Like the best of festivals anywhere in the world, Phd Thesis On Wireless Mesh Networks Job Description . Job Data: Job Title: Service Writer . Department: Service Department, Pro Power Sports & Marine, Inc. Supervisor: Service Maryland Doom Fest is put together out of love and passion alone. Nobody’s getting rich of running it, and if you go and see familiar faces it’s because when you’re there they embrace you like family. I will miss seeing these people and being exposed over the course of four days to a completely unmanageable onslaught of live music. It just doesn’t seem to be the world we live in anymore.

Their statement is in the image below. Click it to enlarge, click it again to shrink it back:

maryland doom fest 2020 canceled

MDDF Presents:

MDDF Presents WINO’S BIRTHDAY BASH!!
SEP 26 – 5PM
Cafe 611, 611 N Market St, Frederick, MD 21701
https://www.facebook.com/events/1228169924219854/

https://www.facebook.com/events/827407774319811/
https://www.facebook.com/MdDoomFest/
https://www.instagram.com/marylanddoomfest/
www.marylanddoomfest.com

Maryland Doom Fest 2020 playlist

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Review & Track Premiere: Yatra, All is Lost

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

yatra all is lost

[Click play above to stream the premiere of ‘Eyes of Light’ from Yatra’s All is Lost. Album is out Oct. 9 on Grimoire Records. Says Dana Helmuth: “Athalon is a mythical place or kingdom I invented in the Yatra world, based off the Greek root definition of a major event or trial. ‘Sceptres seeking of Athalon’ pertains to these self righteous leaders and charlatans portraying their magical world that will exist if you bow down and follow their sceptre. ‘Eyes of light they shine, like broken diamonds of night.'”]

Maryland sludge upstarts First paragraph of an argumentative essay on a rose describe a great time you. The Associated Press delivers in-depth custom essay education coverage on today's Big Yatra will release their third album, Examples Of An Apa Research Paper - Online Research Paper Writing Company - We Help Students To Get Professional Essays, Research Papers and up to Dissertations For All is Lost, on Oct. 9. The record reunites the three-piece with Essay Writer Gumtree - Opt for the service, and our qualified scholars will fulfil your order supremely well Instead of wasting time in inefficient Grimoire Records, and even before you hit play and hear the opening squiggly riff of the title-track that launches the nine-song/34-minute beast, it is an offering of both the familiar and unfamiliar from the band. Being back with Do Homework Sims 3 Ps3 I is an 8-week online business writing course. If you want to improve your business writing skills, then this course is ideal for you! Grimoire means they returned to the studio with producer/engineer commercial paper underwriters at personalessaywriter.com Best assignments help: benefit from the expertise of our authors in motivation letters and application essay Noel Mueller, who of course helmed their 2018 debut, We Are Able To Resolve Your Query “Best Dissertation Writing Service Uk” Instantly As We Have Professionals For This Task! “Oh my God, I’m Death Ritual (discussed here), while the subsequent Jan. 2020 LP, Masters Without Thesis Online Degree Where to find cheap research paper writing services? Cheap turns out to be expensive if one is not careful. And if so did anyone think Blood of the Night (review here), was recorded by When you write a research paper, Who can recommended you read? It means you've taken the first step towards academic greatness. Kevin Bernsten If you have any problems concerning writing tasks, then you need the best Ks3 Homework that can solve them easily. We are ready to do it!  and released through  Alpha market analysis template business plans provides you the best in class, plagiarism free and value for money Content at your convenient time from experts. STB.

They complement this return to roost with a sonic turn toward the extreme that one can only listen to and think of as the manifestation a band like  Best Essay Writing Services have created the list of the best Argumentative Essay On Welfare. This should help you to choose the most suitable one. Yatra has to be feeling during the course of this wretched waste of a year. Normally hard-touring and already plenty uncompromising when it comes to their sound,  All is Lost lives up in terms of sound to the despair laid forth in its title. A group who’d put the time in to garner significant momentum in their favor over the last couple years, hitting the road on numerous occasions for stretches long and short — including a we-mean-business Fall 2019 European run — there’s a chunk of 2020 that should by rights have been theirs to devour as they saw fit on higher-profile tours supporting the second record.

The tradeoff, maybe, is that the great gnashing of teeth that songs like “All is Lost,” the lumbering “Tyrant Throne” and “One for the Mountain” — which show some of guitarist/vocalist Dana Helmuth‘s cleaner-singing approach as it seems to be developing in real-time; a mixture that still calls to mind Matt Pike but particularly in “Tyrant Throne” has an edge of Slough Feg‘s Mike Scalzi too — unfolding after “All is Lost” and the likewise sharp-edged, fucking-heavy-fucking-metal, someone-remind-me-to-send-drummer-SeanLafferty-a-thank-you-card-for-opening-up-that-groove highlight chorus of “Winter’s Dawning,” which follows. If progressive death metal is the new doom, and it is, then Helmuth, bassist Maria Geisbert and Lafferty will continue to walk their own path in dirt-coated metallic extremity — there’s very little one would call progressive here, apart maybe from an attention to the tightness of their songs on the whole.

“One for the Mountain,” which would seem to end side A while giving over to the sitar-introduced tracklist centerpiece “Blissful Wizard” — best sitar on a death metal cut I’ve heard since Amorphis‘ “Tuonela”; I think also the only, but still — is easier to read as catchy because of the relatively clear vocals, but “Blissful Wizard” has a strong hook of its own, and as noted with “Winter’s Dawning” above and pieces as well like “All is Lost” and side B’s “Talons of Eagles” and “Eyes of Light” that begin with their title-lines and immediately establish themselves in the listener’s mind through harshly-barked repetitions thereof, that hook is hardly alone. Extremity of purpose coinciding with a honing of craft. Brutality that refuses to relinquish nod for technicality or songwriting for aesthetic. “Eyes of Light,” blastbeats and all, is death metal. To be sure, much of All is Lost is. Even on the slower stretches of “Tyrant Throne” or in the penultimate plodder “‘Twas the Night,” there is a creeping-Slayer sinister feel to Helmuth‘s riff that Geisbert and Lafferty bring all the more forward through their accompanying lurch.

yatra (Photo by Nicole Strouse)

It’s not necessarily that the readjustment of priorities in Yatra‘s sound is a revolutionary act for them — I compared their last record to Carcass, doubt I was the first to do so, and even at its most primitive their output has to-date carried more than an air of bludgeoning, if at times primarily in the vocals — but it goes back to the blend of the familiar and the unfamiliar, and it’s the direct engagement with what were previously the darkest and harshest aspects of Yatra that, coupled again with the songwriting, makes All is Lost a moment of realization for the band. It is of course impossible to know now how much this one LP will define the path they follow moving forward from it as they inevitably will — or won’t, in which case the point is moot — but what Yatra forge in this material, from the title-cut all the way through the agonizing twists of “Northern Lights” at the album’s finish, is a sonic persona for themselves that rests more within its own individuality than in the conventions of genre.

That is, All is Lost is the point in their career at which Yatra have unveiled not just their best collection of tracks up to now, but a perspective through which they’re approaching the creation of those tracks in the first place. Once a band is pigeonholed as a thing, it can be nearly impossible to work against that — see “sludge upstarts” above; it just rolls off the keyboard, when in fact the record positions them as more stylistically than just sludge (nothing against sludge) and mature beyond “upstart” status — but on the back of All is Lost, Yatra have the potential to transcend niche genre and engage a broader metal audience.

And this is why, even among the hordes of bands unable to tour in 2020, one feels all the more sympathy for Yatra. Because, instead of sitting around, unable to get on tour, they pushed ahead and made a new full-length, and in so doing managed to end up right back where they started from in January: having just put together their best work yet and still be unlikely to give it the live support it deserves. Is all lost? No. But all is ephemeral. In addition to not knowing what Yatra might do next, I’ll also cop to having no idea what the world is going to do next — nothing good, if past is prologue — but as much as the momentum the band built behind them for Death Ritual and into Blood of the Night can be sustained through releasing All is Lost, if they’re going to return to playing live with their former fervency, that momentum will need to be fed at some point.

Or maybe they just become a studio band, play the odd socially-distant gig and make that work. Again, I don’t know. Who the hell does? But today, no, all is not lost. Yatra just made their best album yet. They’ll lose some heads with it, but probably gain even more, and the viciousness of their execution is a statement unto itself that just because it can’t be hand-delivered doesn’t mean punishment isn’t to be meted out. They went back home and found themselves. It’s like the start of a rom-com, only with deathsludge riffs and talons lacing into weak flesh.

So, fucking a.

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Yatra Announce New Album All is Lost Due Oct. 9

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 12th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

yatra (Photo by Nicole Strouse)

Yo, anyone remember January? Me neither. That was the last time I went to a show. It’s also when Maryland sludgebringers Yatra put out their second album, Blood of the Night (review here) through STB Records on Jan. 31 of this wretched year, and before 2020 is out they’ll follow it with All is Lost, a third full-length aptly titled from a band whose business model was based almost entirely around touring.

Worth noting that after releasing through STB, the trio have gone to ground, as it were, and returned to work with producer/engineer Noel Mueller and his Grimoire Records label. Mueller also issued Yatra‘s 2018 debut, Death Ritual (discussed here), so it seems like a fair enough homecoming for them as a group.

I find it interesting that Yatra via the PR wire are highlighting more psychedelic aspects to their sound. You can read about it below. I can’t help but wonder if they aren’t perhaps following the path of Zoroaster in branching out to more expansive atmospheric fare after beginning their progression from a place of raw, primitive crush. In any case, the quick quick turnaround is welcome, even if their assessment of current circumstance via the title is grim.

To the PR wire:

yatra all is lost

YATRA: Maryland Psychedelic Doom Trio Completes All Is Lost Full-Length For October Release Through Grimoire Records; Album Details And Preorders Posted

Maryland-based psychedelic doom metal trio YATRA recently finalized work on their most ambitious and devastating release to date. The band proudly offers their crushing third album, All Is Lost, now confirmed for October release through Grimoire Records, who this week issues the record’s cover art, track listing, preorders, and more.

Upon release of their acclaimed Death Ritual debut LP, released in 2018 via Grimoire Records, YATRA immediately found a secure place in the doom metal scene, providing a devastating brew of crushing musicianship backed with an equally potent element of psychedelic prowess, inciting widespread reactions from media and fans alike. The band gigged and toured heavily on the album, while work was underway on their second record, Blood Of The Night, which saw release via STB Records in early 2020. Just as the band was primed to peak with a new round of international touring, the COVID-19 pandemic engulfed the globe, and alongside every other touring act worldwide, things came to a stunning halt for the band.

YATRA instantly went into full-on construction of the next phase of their journey, taking the ideas they had for the third album into a fresh dimension of instantaneous new reality. The elements of their third LP, All Is Lost, were born, and a new plan was implemented. Once the immediate lockdowns and quarantines of the virus crisis were lifted, the members of the band returned to Grimoire Records, and locked up with label/studio guru Noel Mueller to capture the new songs under the strictest social-distancing-friendly circumstances, to record the new album.

Undeniably the heaviest YATRA album to date, All Is Lost surges with nine new tracks that bring an enticing new level of quality and cohesiveness to the unit. Heavier and denser, with more vibrant psychedelic poise, All Is Lost devastates with nine new tracks that once again place the band into the upper echelons of the genre.

All Is Lost was captured at Tiny Castle between June 18th and 21st, 2020, engineered, recorded, mixed, and mastered by Noel Mueller of Grimoire Records, and completed with cover art by Paolo Girardi (Power Trip, Black Breath, Bell Witch).

YATRA’s All Is Lost will see release through Grimoire Records October 9th on CD, digital download, and in a limited vinyl run of 100 copies. Find preorders HERE: https://grimoirerecords.bandcamp.com/album/all-is-lost

All Is Lost Track Listing:
1. All Is Lost
2. Winter’s Dawning
3. Tyrant Throne
4. One For The Mountain
5. Blissful Wizard
6. Talons Of Eagles
7. Eyes Of Light
8. ‘Twas The Night
9. Northern Lights

YATRA’s founder Dana Helmuth divulges, “After three US tours, a successful European tour, many major festival appearances, a great second album, and two more future US tours ahead, as well as a return to Europe being booked, our future looked bright! Then, almost overnight, everything was cancelled and shut down and all that we had worked so hard for was abruptly halted with no idea when our life would resume as we had come to know it as a touring band.

We were literally packed and loaded to head out in mid-March for the start of a cross country tour, when across the country, things started shutting down and quarantine began. After the realization sank in, and then a forced break from playing altogether, as well as our band life in general, due to proximity and difficulty traveling in quarantine, I found myself back in a similar head space I was when I wrote our first album, Death Ritual. Of course, the band has evolved, but the atmosphere of being back in the woods, in that old house again, coupled with the darkness and fear in the world with everything so grim…

With what seemed like no hope for the future of mankind on earth, I started writing this album, All Is Lost, and it flowed out very naturally. With that return to nature and the dark spiritual introspection that follows, it seemed only natural to return to Noel [Mueller, of Grimoire Records] to record this album, back where we started, and I think that comes through strongly in this record. It was important for me to record this as soon as possible, during this time of the virus. Where on our earlier albums we flirted with subtle musical influences in different subgenres of Heavy Metal, we now fully embrace those sounds, and have become them.”

YATRA completed four US tours in 2019 alone, including Monolith On The Mesa, Electric Funeral, SXSW, New England Doom Fest, Grim Reefer, and Descendants Of Crom, as well as a three week European tour including performances for huge audiences at Desertfest Belgium, Hostsabbat, Into The Void, and Setalite among others. YATRA has shared the stage with Sleep, Eyehategod, Uada, Torche, Om, Conan, Big Business, Nebula, and countless others.

Now in 2020, when touring is one element in a questionable future, YATRA delivers their second album of the year with a monolithic statement of not slowing down.

YATRA:
Dana Helmuth – guitars/vocals
Maria Geisbert – bass
Sean Lafferty – drums

http://www.facebook.com/yatradoom
https://www.instagram.com/yatra_doom
https://yatradoom.bandcamp.com
http://www.grimoirerecords.com
http://grimoirerecords.bandcamp.com
http://www.facebook.com/GrimoireRecords
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Yatra, Blood of the Night (2020)

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Stream Review: Clutch, Live at the Doom Saloon II, 08.07.20

Posted in Reviews on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

clutch doom saloon 1

Clutch clearly learned a few lessons from the first Live at the Doom Saloon streamed concert they performed at the end of May. Lighting, multiple cameras operated by video collaborators David Brodsky and Robb Brown, and even a fog machine saved for the end of the show, which ran an hour long and boasted a fan-picked set. The guy’s name was Marshall, he won — among other things — an Orange amp. Go figure. Marshall got numerous shout outs from Clutch vocalist Neil Fallon between songs — “another awkward guitar change, thanks Marshall,” etc. — but it was a righteous set and clearly the work of an established fan, running as it did from Clutch‘s earliest days to 2018’s Book of Bad Decisions (review here), their latest album, and “Smoke Banshee” from 2001’s Pure Rock Fury, which was recently re-recorded for their ‘Weathermaker Vault Series.’

That series seems to be an ongoing project awaiting handy compilation, but in the meantime, Live at the Doom Saloon II will be released on limited vinyl, and as part of the proceeds from merch was going directly to the band’s crew — obviously out of work with no touring happening; Clutch are an American small business enterprise as well as a band; pro-rock and all that — there’s little doubt the LPs will go if they’re not already gone. Those as well as commemorative t-shirts featuring art with the “king of the dragon men” — a reference to the song “Oregon,” which closed the set; nicely done, Marshall — were available to coincide with the stream, and though of course seeing Clutch on a screen isn’t the same as seeing them in person, at least they were playing live. Fallon changed the lyrics of set-opener “How to Shake Hands” from “I know how to work a room” to “I know how to work a Zoom,” both holding the rhyme and winking at the horrific absurdity of this new version of real-life.

Here’s the full set, as the band handily posted afterward:

How to Shake Hands
Power Player
Rock ‘n’ Roll Outlaw
Far Country
Smoke Banshee
What Would a Wookie Do?
Mice and Gods
Profits of Doom
Ghoul Wrangler
King of Arizona
(In The Wake Of) The Swollen Goat
Your Love Is Incarceration
Brazenhead
Oregon

clutch doom saloon logoIs it the bunch of songs I would’ve chosen? No, but it was probably more interesting. I’ve seen Clutch on stage any number of times — most recently last December — and I can’t ever remember them breaking out “Far Country” from the 1991 debut EP, Pitchfork, or the 2009 digital single “King of Arizona.” And putting “How to Shake Hands” next to “Power Player” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll Outlaw” at the start of the gig was clever in terms of drawing a theme back across a span of records from the four-piece’s catalog. “What Would a Wookie Do?” and “King of Arizona” were specifically designated as “deep cuts” by Fallon, but he, bassist Dan Maines, drummer Jean-Paul Gaster and guitarist Tim Sult handled them with aplomb, perhaps missing the crowd energy of having people in the room, but still putting on what felt very much like a Clutch show, if a somewhat one-sided version of one.

The multiple cameras worked well in giving each member of the band screen-time, and Fallon had one to meet head on to deliver lyrics into, which was an added touch of fun. Sadly, Maines did not have the wingback chair that featured in the video for the re-recorded single “Willie Nelson” (posted here) earlier this year, but he as ever was the secret weapon behind Clutch‘s groove. Everyone knows Tim Sult is a wah-master. Dude could teach college classes on the subject. And Gaster is so bop on drums he’s literally bouncing up and down while he plays, funking out the beats as he hits the kit. It’s wild, and Neil Fallon has an entire generation of beardo frontmen following in his wake, none of whom are a match for him in lyrical wit, vocal talent, or on-stage charisma. But Dan Maines, with his wingback chair-worthy subdued presence, is a walking, not really talking, kind-of-grooving-out lesson in how heavy rock bass can be played at its absolute best. In the parlance of our times, he is an essential worker. #achairfordan

I couldn’t help but wonder what the process was for picking a set from among the 4,000 they reportedly received when they put the ask out to their fans and started the contest. If they were looking from something different from the “usual,” they got it. Live staples like “Electric Worry” and “Firebirds!” featured in the first Live at the Doom Saloon, so that ground had been covered. Maybe they were looking for a challenge to themselves; breaking out material they hadn’t played in however long and airing it to fans who, like me, had never seen it live before. Songs like “Mice and Gods” and “(In the Wake Of) The Swollen Goat” were certainly familiar enough, and “Your Love is Incarceration,” more recent, has been a regular in sets supporting Book of Bad Decisions, but “Brazenhead” and “Oregon” both come from 2003’s Slow Hole to China: Rare and Unreleased from Weathermaker Music precursor River Road Records, and I’m going to guess they’ve never closed out a show back to back on their own.

So yeah. Good job, Marshall, I guess.

And for the Doom Saloon III: full album performance?

In my ongoing effort at honest pandemic-era-livestream reportage, I’ll note that I watched the entirety of Live at the Doom Saloon II on my phone sitting on the edge of my son’s favorite sandbox while he played with digger trucks. The morning rebroadcast. Yup, the full hour. Kid really likes trucks. He’d check in periodically, say, “Watching Clutch,” then go back to the excavator or the front-end loader. There you go. Real life.

Thanks to Suze Wright for making this one happen for me, and thanks to you for reading.

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Cavern Announce Aug. 28 Release for Powdered

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

cavern

You can definitely hear the modern progressive influences making themselves felt in “Dove,” which is the new streaming track from Marylander post-rockers Cavern. It’s the penultimate cut on the now-trio’s upcoming long-player, Powdered. It is the first album the band have put together since drummer Stephen Schrock and guitarist Zach Harkins were joined by bassist/vocalist Rose Heater, whose presence changes the dynamic twice-over, bringing voice to what was previously instrumental and adding low-end to the rhythm, thereby letting the guitar explore different directions. Which it would seem to be doing if “Dove” is any indication.

That the band traveled to Massachusetts to record with Kurt Ballou of Converge is a significant sign that how they’re thinking about what they do has changed, and perhaps that they’re looking to reach a broader audience than they had previously. Touring would help that too, but you know how that goes.

Album preorders are up, if you want to get on the action, and the track is streaming below:

CAVERN POWDERED

CAVERN: Maryland Atmospheric Post-Rock Trio To Release Powdered Full-Length Next Month; New Track Streaming + Preorders Available

Maryland-based atmospheric post-rock trio CAVERN will release their fourth full-length, Powdered, August 28th.

The six tracks comprising Powdered were recorded at GodCity Studio in Salem, Massachusetts with the legendary Kurt Ballou (Converge) and Zach Weeks and mastered by Magnus Lindberg (Cult Of Luna). Elaborates drummer Stephen Schrock, “The writing process for CAVERN has always been a very collaborative effort which normally results in [guitarist] Zach Harkins and I getting angry at one another over very minuscule elements of songs. [Bassist/vocalist] Rose [Heater] provided a very cool headed voice and approach when it came to getting the songs finished. We decided to record with Kurt at GodCity while we were driving back from a Canadian tour in 2019. We had already recorded a few songs at a different studio but wanted to take things to the next level. We had talked to Kurt before about recording when we were a two-piece but thought that he could really help us achieve the sound we wanted with this new material… We want our sound to be abrasive and loud but also groovy and bright at times. We all have such different influences and come from different backgrounds musically so we’re constantly trying to keep things interesting and have fun while also remaining thoughtful and heartfelt.”

In advance of the record’s release, CAVERN is pleased to unveil first single, “Dove.” Notes Heater of the track, “‘Dove’ was one of the last songs I wrote lyrics for on the record. The words that kept popping up created images of my own experience with anxiety. The song ended up being my representation of a panic attack.”

Powdered will be released independently on digital and vinyl formats. For preorders and to stream “Dove,” visit the CAVERN Bandcamp page at THIS LOCATION.

Powdered Track Listing:
1. River
2. Grey
3. Powdered
4. Red Moon
5. Dove
6. Fade Before The Flood

CAVERN was forged in 2012 by best friends Zach Harkins and Stephen Schrock. Over the span of eight years they’ve toured North America and recorded four albums.

While the band’s first two offerings — their self-titled 2013 debut and 2014 EP Tales Of Ruin — were a fusion of heavy progressive-leaning instrumentals and abrasive post-hardcore vocals often compared to the early work of Mastodon and Baroness, their third record — 2015’s Outsiders — was the band’s first instrumental effort. Teeth Of The Divine hailed a record that was, “harder than Russian Circles, more energetic than Pelican, and more progressive than anything post-American Don Caballero.”

Following the release of Outsiders, CAVERN spent a few years touring and writing their fourth record, Eater, which was unveiled in 2018. Teeth Of The Divine again weighed in championing the band’s, “untouchable melodies, tough musical turns, and unpredictable songwriting,” that, “wraps its arms around you and take you for the ride.” Shortly thereafter, the band saw the addition of Rose Heater on vocals/bass in late 2018. This updated lineup spent nearly two years writing and touring their newest material. This year welcomes their first full-length as a trio with Powdered. In an ever-changing world, CAVERN continues to challenge themselves and their listeners with a sound that keeps people guessing.

CAVERN:
Rose Heater- bass/vocals
Stephen Schrock – drums
Zach Harkins – guitars

http://www.cavernband.com
https://cavernmd.bandcamp.com/
http://www.facebook.com/cavernmd
http://www.instagram.com/cavernband
http://cavern.bigcartel.com

Cavern, Powdered (2020)

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Review & Full Album Stream: Wino, Forever Gone

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

wino forever gone

[Click play above to stream Wino’s Forever Gone in full. Album is out Friday on Ripple Music with preorders here for US and here for EU.]

It is overwhelming to consider the tumult of the decade between Scott “Wino” Weinrich‘s 2010 debut solo album, Adrift (review here), and this follow-up, Forever Gone. The dissolution of Shrinebuilder, the acoustic collaboration with German singer-songwriter Conny Ochs, the tenure fronting Saint Vitus that ended in an arrest in Norway for amphetamine possession and subsequent ban from Schengan Area countries in Europe — which was a five-year sentence, but still resulted in his being unable to tour there last year — as well as reunions first with The Obsessed, then Spirit Caravan, then Spirit Caravan becoming The Obsessed and changing its lineup before putting out their first album in two decades. Through all of this and the inevitable whatever-it-was I left out, Weinrich continued to perform solo acoustic shows, and so the notion of a second album was never completely absent, but apparently it took some doing to make it happen.

But if it was Weinrich‘s goal to channel living through those years into the craft and performance of Forever Gone — released through Ripple Music where Adrift was on Exile on Mainstream — it comes through as a palpable emotional and atmospheric weight in songs like the opening title-track, “No Wrong” and “Lavender and Sage,” and the penultimate “Was, Is and Shall Be,” the latter two of which feature guest vocals. Thinking of arrangements as compared to the 2010 offering, Forever Gone feels much less restricted to a guy-and-guitar aesthetic. There’s the slide in “You’re So Fine,” drums and electrics on “Dark Ravine,” an electric solo woven into early highlight “Taken” and vocal layering used sporadically throughout. The effect this has is to make minimalist moments like “The Song’s at the Bottom of the Bottle” and “Dead Yesterday” — which if nothing else certainly feels like a thematic answer to “Forever Gone” itself — stand out all the more, conveying the loneliness, regret and contemplation at root in some of the material while still leaving room for hope in more expansive pieces like “Dark Ravine” or the closing Joy Division cover “Isolation,” which comes through almost as a full-band, with drums, electric and acoustic guitars, and multiple layers of voice.

That finale should be readily enough familiar to those who’ve kept up with Wino‘s solo work live in the last eight or so years, and it’s also one of several of the pieces throughout Forever Gone that draws from the Wino & Conny Ochs collaborations. “Isolation” appeared on their Labour of Love 2012 Latitudes session (discussed here), while “Dead Yesterday” and “Dark Ravine” appeared on that same year’s full-length debut (also on Exile on Mainstream), Heavy Kingdom (review here), and “Crystal Madonna” and “Forever Gone” itself featured on Freedom Conspiracy (review here) in 2015. As Forever Gone is serving double-duty as the beginning of a series of acoustic-based Ripple releases called ‘Blood and Strings,’ it’s not like anyone’s trying to pass these off as brand new — Wino isn’t “getting one over” or anything like that — but the familiarity of some of the material and the refresh on the arrangements gives them new life and while obviously Weinrich is at the center of all the material, the work of producer Frank “The Punisher” Marchand isn’t to be ignored when it comes to the finished product of Forever Gone.

scott wino weinrich

Whether it’s intertwining electrics and acoustics at the start of “Taken” or giving a sense of space through subtle vocal echo thereafter, or highlighting the classic blues rock feel of “You’re So Fine” to bring a moment of joy between the more melancholic “Dead Yesterday” and “Crystal Madonna,” each strum is as crisp as it wants to be, and Wino‘s voice comes through with no less instrumental detail, the product of decades of living and singing hard manifest in making the languid melody of “Lavender and Sage” feel like something earned rather than simply adopted as a stylistic choice. Part of that of course stems from the narrative of Wino‘s career itself, but if ever there was a place for such context and for his personality to come through as sharply as it does, Forever Gone would seem to be it, and Marchand is due much credit in making that happen.

Weinrich‘s in-genre legacy is well established through his work in The Obsessed, Saint Vitus, The Hidden Hand, etc., and doesn’t need to be recounted here anymore than it already has. What comes through most on Forever Gone is that, rather than seeing an artist resting on his laurels and self-indulgently pushing through 11 songs and 45 minutes of assembled material, Wino here brings the unmistakable character of songwriting and passion of performance that has made him the figurehead he is. It is an indelible mark of his work and whether it’s in the relatively uptempo version here of “Dark Ravine” or in “Crystal Madonna” — which was a highlight of Freedom Conspiracy and is one on Forever Gone as well — it is the foundation on which these songs, new and old alike, are built. With the variety in arrangements and guests in and out adding to Weinrich‘s vocals and guitar, there is a sense of completeness about Forever Gone that feels progressed forward from Adrift even as it stays loyal to the form.

It is impossible to know where the next decade might take Wino as a performer or a human being, but with this collection, his place as America’s Godfather of Doom is reaffirmed even as he breaks the confines of doom itself; though anyone who tells you Forever Gone isn’t heavy needs to recheck their definition of the word. As vibrant as this material is, and as much as it brims with the passion and creative intensity that brought it to bear in the studio, there continues to be a heft that is either underlying or at the fore, moving no less dynamically than the arrangements of the songs throughout, and no less crucial to the understanding of what this record is. I’ve said before, on plenty of occasions, there’s only one Wino. That’s where the count remains. And if Forever Gone is his way of marking the passage of the last 10 years, it is of due substance to be up to that task.

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Morton Gaster Papadopoulos Premiere “The Burnt Offerings”

Posted in audiObelisk on June 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Morton Gaster Papadopoulos

If the guys from Morton Gaster Papadopoulos aren’t careful, they’re going to end up being an actual band. You might recall last summer a jam was premiered here by the project featuring Yanni Papadopoulos of Stinking Lizaveta, Jean-Paul Gaster of Clutch and Mark Morton from Lamb of God, and the trio are back with what might legitimately be called a single in the form of “The Burnt Offerings.” The new track brings them into more structured songcraft, and they sure sound like a band. With Naeemah Maddox on vocals and Chris Brooks on keys, “The Burnt Offerings” wants nothing for arrangement or intensity, and while noting that something “speaks to the moment” has actually become one of the moment’s most brutal cliches, Maddox‘s voice as a woman of color resonates in the early verses. It is a voice that needs to be heard, especially in an underground so predominantly, exhaustingly white and male.

Morton Gaster Papadopoulos naeemah maddox chris brooks

“The Burnt Offerings” runs just under six minutes and right about at its midpoint there’s a break. By that point, Maddox has locked step with a building rhythmic intensity, and from there, Brooks‘ keys take a prominent position alongside a solo from Morton, with clean lines from Papadopoulos and Gaster supporting. The vocals return soon, and the effect is progressive and sweeping, almost psych-Beatles-style melodymaking, but the protest-song spirit continues in the repeated lines, “Let me tell you something/I think you oughtta know.” The group — and for the purposes here, it feels very much like a five-piece rather than the trio plus two guests — ride that movement out to a last crash and some final keys, but the only thing that seems to stop it is them. I’d easily take another 10-15 minutes of that jam with Maddox improv’ing lines overtop. That’d be just fine.

Alas, not this time. Maddox and Papadopoulos were both kind enough to offer a few words about the making of “The Burnt Offerings” — which was recorded by the esteemed J. Robbins (Clutch, Caustic Casanova, and so on) — below, and graciously gave permission for me to host the single as both a premiere and a free download. I hope you’ll take the time to enjoy it and join me in waiting for whatever the project might come up with next.

Dig:

Naeemah Maddox on “The Burnt Offerings”:

In the current social climate it is no longer sufficient to be non-racist. One must be anti-racist. This moment demands true accountability, and real change.

Transnational corporations stating their support for BLM should only be taken as sincere if they also advocate and lobby for social reforms like a living wage, universal healthcare, and defunding and demilitarising the police; using these new freed up resources to reinvest in vulnerable communities that need it most.

The time has long passed for petty sloganeering and cynical tokenism. Being against police brutality in 2020 shouldn’t even be a political issue. This is a failure of our society and goes beyond political persuasion. This is about human rights and creating a world our children would want to live in.

Yanni Papadopoulos on “The Burnt Offerings”:

This were my riffs that I brought to the table when jamming with Mark and JP. Those guys took the parts and rearranged them in a less linear order and Mark added his own fills in the spaces. Of course Naeemah wrote her own parts to the arrangement with lyrics, vox and flute. Chris Brooks filled in the keys. However, it all started with a bassline which I thought JP could really sink his teeth into. J. Robbins was great to work with, he knew just how to make sense of it all. What your hearing is virtually a live in the studio track. Mark’s solo was cut live with bass and drums with no edits. First take magic!

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Dee Calhoun Posts “No Justice” Video; Godless Preorder Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Imagine that when Dee Calhoun wrote the track “No Justice” he was talking about one incident. That was the world in the before-times, the long-long ago. And I’m not noting that to downplay the tragic loss what was the shooting of Rev. Jim Forrester of Foghound, Sixty Watt Shaman — the community around Maryland doom is still reeling from that, and rightly so — but these days one could easily look around and say, “Yeah, ‘No Justice,’ but could you be more specific?”

Calhoun‘s new record, Godless, is set to arrive on July 10 in a continued partnership with Argonauta Records. Preorders are up and for those seeking something of a dark acousti-metal flavor, I know of few parties who might be able to deliver with the boom Dee has in his voice and the passion for what he does. My two cents.

Info and video came down the PR wire:

dee calhoun

DEE CALHOUN, voice of iconic IRON MAN & SPIRAL GRAVE, releases system- critical video of “No Justice”!

Brand new album, Godless, coming out July 10th on Argonauta Records!

July 10th, 2020 will see Dee Calhoun, voice of iconic doom titans, IRON MAN, and SPIRAL GRAVE release his upcoming, third solo- album titled Godless. The haunting and dark, entirely acoustic affair, was recorded in Dee’s home studio, The DustBuster in Walkersville, MD. The mastering was done by Doug Benson in nearby Thurmont MD at the Commodore Recording Studios. Dee handled vocals, guitars and other various instruments, while Dee’s Iron Man and Spiral Grave bandmate, Louis Strachan, provided the bass tracks. Dee’s son Robert, “Little ‘Houn” Calhoun, appears on the record with percussion and backing vocals performances.

Today, Dee is presenting us a very special song taken from Godless, to the touching and system- critical track “No Justice”. “I wrote this song for the great Rev. Jim Forrester, who was bassist for Foghound and beloved by the Maryland Doom scene.“ Dee explains. “It was written on the day his murderer was acquitted, and all of us who loved Jim again felt betrayed by the system in this country. In recent days, that idea has taken on a much bigger scope. As we now sit and watch the response to injustice, we can only hope that steps are being taken to assure that there will be a change, and that betrayal, heartbreak, and death from this broken system can be eliminated.”

Dee Calhoun began his musical journey nearly 40 years ago, and first appeared on record in the late 1980s. Aside being the vocalist of Spiral Grave, he was the singer and lyricist for Doom icons Iron Man from 2010 until the passing of founding member Alfred Morris III in 2018, appearing on two of their EPs and the critically acclaimed 2013 LP South of the Earth. Calhoun released two critically acclaimed solo-albums to date, his new album Godless will be available on July 10th via Argonauta Records. The pre-sale is now available at THIS LOCATION.

‘Godless’ album lineup:
Dee Calhoun: voice, guitars, keyboards, harmonica, ukulele, kazoo
Louis Strachan: bass guitar
Robert Calhoun: backing vocals, percussion

additional performers:
Meghan Randall: flute solo on “The Day Salvation Went Away”
Alfred Morris III: guitar effects on “Prudes, Puritanicals, Puddles of Piss”

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Dee Calhoun, “No Justice” official video

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