Days of Rona: “Dirty Dave” Johnson of The Glasspack

Posted in Features on May 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

the glasspack dave johnson (photo by Chris Jenner)

Days of Rona: “Dirty Dave” Johnson of The Glasspack (Louisville, Kentucky)

boys state essay help Continue Reading works cited essay cv writing service huddersfield How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

We are basically not dealing. We are not dealing with the Glasspack as a band during coronacrisis. The band aspect is on hold. Individual survival is obviously more important right now. What’s more, our state of Kentucky has been at the forefront of progressive measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus by basically shutting everything down in the state, except “essential” businesses, and forbidding gatherings.

Thus, everything changed for the Glasspack in what seems like the blink of an eye. We have been completely separated, other than by electronic means.

Having said the above, however, I have been dealing with the band stuff alone. And, yes, I have had to rework plans for the band and adapt as I go. The Glasspack completed the writing and demoing process of all new music for our upcoming “Moon Patrol” release. So, I have been trying to take advantage of the down time in isolation by writing lyrics and vocals for the demo recording. I have also been working on an upcoming live video release of the Glasspack live at DeadBird Recording Studios in Louisville (2020). I, myself, have been selling Glasspack merchandise too on our new Bandcamp page to repay our debts incurred in anticipation of SXSW 2020 (cancelled). The Bandcamp experience has been quite an adjustment too.

When this virus broke out, we were in the middle of plans for a trip to SXSW 2020 in March this year to play about six parties. We were one of the first bands to make a decision in regard to our plans for SXSW 2020 immediately after SXSW cancelled their official festival. After a long discussion considering all the factors and concerns of this then potential crisis, we voted to cancel all SXSW 2020 plans. It was a very difficult decision and rocked the band to the core, no pun intended.

In the end, the city of Austin, TX shut everything down anyway. Personally, I was a bit frustrated at the time because I had been working on those SXSW 2020 plans since October 2019. However, I remain positive and also believe everything happens for a reason the Universe sees fit.

I choose to see the positive opportunities in negative circumstances these days. I actually established and learned how to use Bandcamp.com as a band during all this. This learning experience also provided a chance to upload some Glasspack recordings not previously released digitally.

I believe everyone of the Glasspack is in good health thus far and I have faith we will remain that way. Everything will work for the band as it is meant to.

Get Qualitative essay on gender roles Services in UK,USA & Australia. Consult to our expert consultants and get assistance at all stages of your What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Kentucky has been at the forefront of progressive action towards the crisis. The KY governor ordered nonessential retail businesses to close to the public. He also forbid gatherings in groups. However, the governor’s requests did fall on some deaf corporate ears, university students, street-racers, and church-goers for a bit.

Eventually, our governor and the courts started ordering folks into quarantine by police force. This resulted in some failed attempts of Kentuckians to constitutionally challenge the governor’s orders on various First Amendment grounds. However, the Tenth Amendment power of a state in regard to the health, welfare, and safety of its citizens during a crisis is very powerful as well. See the “days of small pox.”

You can check out more on Constitutional issues and coronavirus in Kentucky here:
https://www.kentucky.com/news/coronavirus/article242094661.html

The courts eventually shut down physically too, although certified attorneys like me can carry out electronic filing and Zoom video conferencing to continue working. The issue, however, is no new business came in my law office for a long time due to all this coronacrisis stuff. It damn near destroyed my business and made it nearly impossible for me to carry out the work I needed to do. But, again, what will be will be and my office still exists. I am very grateful because I know a lot of small businesses will not fair as well.

The police of Kentucky basically just went into hiding and did nothing, as usual, but that is better than causing the ruckus they have been causing for a while. The LMPD is a constant source of national controversy.

Now, everything is starting to open back up but the people of my county, Jefferson, are receiving Fs for public social distancing after the state was receiving As for its efforts in fighting the pandemic. That is discouraging.

Even when everything is open, I am not going to risk my health and safety or that of others. I will wear a mask and practice proper social distancing.

Most importantly, however, I will keep my positive mental attitude regardless of all this.

Professional Gattaca Essay Help by native English writers. Get the best high-quality and SEO optimized blog and web content at affordable prices. How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Louisville, our city, and Kentucky, our state, are basically a hot mess of political strife over all this right now. Just yesterday, protesters hung a dummy from a tree with our Governor’s face on it and some Latin. (“sic semper tyrannis” which is Latin for “thus, always to tyrants”). I mean this place is fucking boiling over.

You can check out more on Kentucky political strife here:
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/may/25/kentucky-governor-effigy-protest

The combination of everything said above in my responses to prior questions has resulted in Kentucky musicians being even poorer than they were already. Some Louisville musicians and members of the Glasspack work for essential businesses too which have to remain open. And yet, some other Louisville musicians, including members of the Glasspack, work for assholes who refuse to stop in favor everyone’s health. Both of those scenarios are scary as Hell right now.

Some other Louisville musicians are taking advantage of playing live streams on the internet under careful conditions to make money. Also, like me, a lot of Kentucky musicians are just sitting in their rooms alone writing awesome songs in isolation, no doubt.

You can check out more on Louisville bands and live streams here:
https://www.facebook.com/deadbirdlive/
https://www.facebook.com/headlinersmusichall/

As I said above too, I have been spending extra time selling Glasspack merch on Bandcamp to pay our debts. We ordered a bunch of merchandise to take to SXSW 2020. I basically take the orders, fill the orders, and deliver the orders in and around Louisville. The folks of Louisville overwhelmingly have helped us in my efforts! I am very appreciative and grateful!

And, we still sell t-shirts for $12!

You can check out more on the Glasspack’s Bandcamp page here:
https://theglasspack.bandcamp.com/

It is very unclear, especially in Kentucky, when bars and music venues will be able to start having shows again under the coronacrisis circumstances. I have a bad feeling that a lot of our amazing and unique bars and venues in Louisville will shut down, leaving nowhere to play. I hope for the best though.

Some of the Louisville record stores have adapted quite well though. Surface Noise is currently taking orders online and making house deliveries! Imagine that! A record store brings you awesome records to your step and then takes all your money! Haha!

You can check out more on Louisville record deliveries and stores here:
https://www.facebook.com/surfacenoiserecords/
https://www.facebook.com/undergroundsoundsrecords/
https://www.facebook.com/funhouse

college application essay writing service a good Why pro and con essays amorce de dissertation dissertation acknoledgements What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Personally, I think everyone needs to take a deep breath, meditate a bit, and be grateful you are still alive! So many Americans have died. It is all really so very sad. But turn the sadness into gratitude every day for all your family, friends, animals, and the Earth! If humanity would just live in sync with the Earth and have respect for animals, I do not think we would be having to deal with all this.

As a musician, I would just like to point out that, right now, it should become very clear that the Arts in general, including music, is a necessary part of the human existence. Perhaps the unfortunate state of affairs for the bands and music industry is just the Universe telling us all it’s time to really value those things. To change! To support them more than ever! I mean, what the fuck are you going to do right now but listen to every god damned record you have and get fucked up? That’s pure pleasure! Especially Hawkwind!

Love,
“Dirty” Dave
The Glasspack

Porchtrait by Chris Jenner.

https://www.facebook.com/theGlasspack/
https://theglasspack.bandcamp.com/

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Fool’s Ghost Sign to Prosthetic Records for Debut LP Dark Woven Light

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 16th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

There’s not a ton to go by in the album teaser Louisville, Kentucky’s Jabref Phd Thesis Dissertation (1200) Let me start this copy editing services article by giving you a brief difference between editing and copyediting services. Fool’s Ghost would seem to tap into some night-edged post-rock vibes at least in part on their debut album, purporting as they do to champion expanded definitions of weight no doubt to include that of emotion and ambience as well as sheer tonality or groove. These are elements at play across various styles — there’s heavy folk just as there’s heavy metal, though there may be less of it in number of practitioners — and of course it’s hard to guess where entirely  Buy Cheap Papers Where to find http://h-d.by/?psychology-essay-writer writing services? Cheap turns out to be expensive if one is not careful. And if so did anyone think Fool’s Ghost‘s debut album,  Well, is exactly what you wished for. http://g-x-m.de/essay-about-character - Cheap prices and best quality with fast delivery to your door. Dark Woven Light, is coming from by a sub-minute sample, so you’ll pardon me if I don’t hazard a guess.

The fact that they’ve signed to  EssayPro offers qualitative http://www.rndincentives.com/diversity-united-states-essay/s. Ensure yourself a successful entry to college or university of your dream! Prosthetic Records for their first album may have something to do with the pedigree of MyCourseworkHelp.co.uk is a website where professional writers work for providing supreme UK http://www.nuotohydros.net/all-college-essays/ as well as Best custom writing service. Nick and Recommended Site - If you need to find out how to compose a good essay, you have to read this choose the service, and our professional writers Amber Thieneman in acts like  Looking for an essay writing service? You found one! At http://www.docomomoiberico.com/?ghost-writer-online you can order a custom written essay just for per page. Breather Resist and  Yelp is a fun and easy way to find, recommend and talk about. Someone do assignment for me, Self Concept Essay, architecture essays architecture Sandpaper Dolls, but the label has never been shy about embracing a range of styles, so if they’re inclined toward some manifestation of progressive reach — and it sounds like they might be, given the airy effects at play — then so be it.

I’ll be interested to find out.

From the PR wire:

fools ghost

PROSTHETIC RECORDS SIGN FOOL’S GHOST; ALBUM AND TOURING SCHEDULED FOR 2020

Prosthetic Records is proud to announce the signing of Louisville, KY duo, FOOL’S GHOST. The label will release their debut album, titled Dark Woven Light, in early 2020 – more details including tour plans are due imminently.

Comprising of Nick Thieneman (Young Widows, Breather Resist) and Amber Thieneman (Liberation Prophecy, Sandpaper Dolls), FOOL’S GHOST are a band small in number but vast in scope. Describing their music as exploring “the liminal state between hope and reality”, FOOL’S GHOST challenge the notion of what heavy music can be. The band previously released two tracks via Bandcamp which give an indication of what to expect when the full length arrives.

Nick comments: “We are excited to join the Prosthetic family, and sonically expand what they are known for.”

E.J. Johantgen of Prosthetic Records adds: “When we heard the early mixes of the album, we were instantly captivated. A world of possibilities are open for band as special and unique as Fool’s Ghost. We’re thrilled to give them a home here at Prosthetic and to work with Nick and Amber going forward.”

Stay tuned for more news on FOOL’S GHOST – and until then check out the album trailer below.

https://www.facebook.com/Fools-Ghost-672679909593868/
https://www.instagram.com/_foolsghost_/
http://facebook.com/prostheticrecords
http://prostheticrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://shop.prostheticrecords.com/

Fool’s Ghost, Dark Woven Light album teaser

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The Glasspack Announce Return to Stage After Nearly a Decade

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 9th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

the glasspack

Louisville, Kentucky, shred-prone blues rock troublemakers Pay To Do My Paper. Custom Essay Writing Service. Services where you can find professional essay writer online are very popular among the internet. The Glasspack will make a return to playing live after almost a decade’s absence. I don’t know when their last show was, but their last album was 2007’s customer retention in e commerce research papers Pay best college admission essays 300 word as creative writing coursework personal statement medical school application Dirty Women on georgetown application essay one page double spaced, supreme buy essays, buy a essay for cheap | Complete set of services for students of all levels including academic writing Small Stone, and guitarist/vocalist “Dirty” Dave Johnson — who means it when he adds the “esq.” to his name; dude’s been to law school — has been talking about the more space rock-minded Moon Patrol release since 2014. Still, getting back to playing a show, let alone the prospect of more than one, is certainly positive forward movement in that LP’s eventual realization, and with so much time gone — at least as The Glasspack — maybe baby steps is the best way to handle it.

I remember seeing these dudes at SXSW years ago at a Small Stone showcase and they tore it up. I’d expect no less from them on stage now, heightened awareness of legality or no.

The show info can be found below, courtesy of the PR wire, along with a teaser for Moon Patrol posted a while back and a live clip from 1999:

the glasspack poster

9/07/2019: The Return of the Glasspack

Please be advised that, after nearly a decade, the Glasspack, Louisville’s notorious psychedelic punk band, is returning to the stage and the studio, including members Dave Johnson, Brett Holsclaw, and Nick Hall. Among other things, the band feels it is once again time to jumpstart Louisville’s rock scene.

For its return to the stage, the Glasspack will headline in Louisville at Headliner’s Music Hall scheduled for Saturday September, 7, 2019. Special guests include Louisville acts Call Me Bronco, Sound Company, and Wiirmz. Both Call Me Bronco and Sound Company have new releases that will be available at the show, as well as local record store. The Glasspack will also have merchandise, including vinyl records and t-shirts, available at the return show.

For years, the Glasspack was on hiatus due to its core members, Dave Johnson, Brett Holsclaw, and Nick Hall, attending school and dealing with other musical acts of Louisville and elsewhere. In the mean time, the band wrote the music for a space rock album, “Moon Patrol,” which the demo for is currently being finished. After the demo is completed, the Glasspack will check into a proper studio to record the album for its fifth full-length release since 1999. The album, “Moon Patrol,” is to be 1 song, 45-minutes long, and split into 7 parts.

Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/2299449970170782/

“DIRTY” DAVE JOHNSON: Vocals, guitars
BRETT “CAP’N” HOLSCLAW: MC, drums
NICHOLAS HALL: Guitars, keys
BILLY LEASE: Guitars, bass
RODNEY ROADS: Bass, guitar

https://www.facebook.com/theGlasspack/
https://www.youtube.com/user/theglasspack

The Glasspack, Moon Patrol teaser

The Glasspack, “Jim Beam and Good Green” Live in Louisville, KY, 1999

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Baby Bones Premiere “Bottom Breather” from The Curse of the Crystal Teeth

Posted in audiObelisk on March 27th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

baby bones

Punk-infused heavy rockers Baby Bones will issue their debut full-length, The Curse of the Crystal Teeth, on April 14 through Gubbey Records. One wonders if the title isn’t a reference to the proven-to-be-a-myth phenomenon of ‘meth mouth,’ but by the time you’ve considered it, thought about all the pictures of gross teeth you saw on the news before opiates became ‘the thin’ again — though I hear meth, like disco, is making a comeback — and googled that Slate article from 2005 that basically painted the whole thing as a class issue and made everyone feel like a jerk, the Louisville, Kentucky, trio are already through the six-track run of the record itself, which tops out at 17 minutes long, ending with the foreboding sample of a woman crying and warning, “I tell my friends to keep your babies close to you. There’s someone out there.”

Of course, by the time you’ve done another round of googling to try and find the source of that sample, Baby Bones are front-to-back once more on The Curse of the Crystal Teeth, which if I haven’t gotten the point across yet is a quick listen. All but one of its component tracks — third cut, “We’re Done Talking,” is the exception — are under three minutes long, and much of the tempo and coursing progression of a song like “Pay us in Dimes” owes itself to rockabilly and classic surf punk, but with a corresponding thickness of tone, one might think of Baby Bones stylistically as a Midwestern cousin to Fatso Jetson. baby bones the curse of the crystal teethOpening with the brisk but melodic “Bought the Farm,” which shifts into an angular, quirk-laden midsection before rounding out by reviving its earlier progression at a sprint and veering into a noisy freakout to finish, The Curse of the Crystal Teeth sets a tone early of being deceptively complex in its changes, and both “Pay us in Dimes” and “We’re Done Talking” hold to that, the latter with Dave Rucinski evoking a post-grunge vocal sensibility alongside his bass, guitar, the guitar of Thomas Burgos and the drums of Jason Brandum — gang shouts of one leading to start-stop riffing and a groovy slowdown that crashes into the like-minded start-stop opening of “Bottom Breather,” which touches on Queens of the Stone Age in vocal melody but remains rawer in its overall sound, turning to a nodding riff seemingly out of nowhere in its second half like younger Melvins before they started believing their own hype and cruising to an easy finish.

That of course leads to the harsher immediacy of “On the Take,” which is the shortest track here at 2:33 and spares nothing in its thrust but bridges a gap between more shouted and cleaner-sung vocals while the guitars work up a torrent of noise that builds to ahead just before 1:45 in and returns the trio to an upward swirl of noise underscored by Brandum‘s steady drums, which crash to mark the ending and begin at an immediately punctuating run on closer “Slick Shoes,” which offers few surprises ultimately but uses noise as a transitional element effectively and shifts between semi-spoken and sung vocals in the verse and chorus, allowing for a richer stylistic feel than otherwise might’ve showed up as Baby Bones slammed into the finish and that aforementioned sample, which is the only one on the short album. Clearly there’s meant to be some threat of violence between that and the band’s moniker, but it’s vague and never seems to really come to fruition in the songs, which is something of a relief, actually.

Not necessarily reinventing the wheel, but burning its tires out at good speed, Baby BonesThe Curse of the Crystal Teeth is a raw but aesthetically engaged, short debut long-player that I’d probably call an EP were it not for the fluidity with which the material draws together. I’m fortunate enough today to be able to premiere “Bottom Breather,” which you’ll find on the player below, followed by a quote from the band and more background courtesy of the PR wire.

Please enjoy:

Thomas Burgos on “Bottom Breather”:

“The second single from Baby Bones, ‘Bottom Breather,’ musically speaking, encompasses a feeling of drowning with a dichotomy of syncopated guitars and a familiar 4/4 drumbeat leading you to believe everything is OK. But that’s just the surface. As the song states, ‘So still, from shore/Turbulent below,’ so too does the song appear calm and collected as hook-filled bridges drag you further and further below its mighty depths challenging conventional interpretation of what rock music is and should be.”

Louisville, Kentucky-based surf punkers BABY BONES are proud to announce the release of their debut album, The Curse of the Crystal Teeth, due out April 14 via Gubbey Records.

Recorded by the band at Tin Pan Basement Studios in Louisville and mastered by Nick Zampiello at New Alliance East in Cambridge, Mass., The Curse of the Crystal Teeth is 17-minutes of riff-oriented acid rock made by veteran punks bent on global domination.

BABY BONES is the compilation of three forces within the local Louisville, Kentucky, music scene. The trio recorded their first song together in 2016 for the highly-publicized “We Have A Bevin Problem” compilation, a response to Kentucky’s attacks on reproductive rights, benefiting Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky. In doing so, the trio propelled themselves into an unknown–but bright–trajectory towards the cosmos.

BABY BONES is:
Dave Rucinski – Guitars, Bass, Vocals
Thomas Burgos – Guitars
Jason Brandum – Drums

Baby Bones website

Baby Bones on Bandcamp

Baby Bones on Thee Facebooks

Gubbey Records on Thee Facebooks

Gubbey Records website

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The Glasspack Return, Ready New Album Moon Patrol

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 24th, 2014 by JJ Koczan

They’ve been on hiatus since releasing a split 7″ with Trophy Wives (review here), but Louisville heavy rockers The Glasspack have announced a return from hiatus to be marked by the release of their fifth album, Moon Patrol. Frontman “Dirty” Dave Johnson has spent the last couple years tearing it up with poli-punkers The Decline Effect, who released their self-titled debut last year (review here), and while The Glasspack have always had more than a dash of punk to their sound, Johnson says they’re moving more toward the open psychedelia of cuts like “Louisiana Strawberry” (video here) from 2007’s Dirty Women.

Seven years have passed since that album came out on Small Stone, so if nothing else, The Glasspack are definitely due. The plan is reportedly for Moon Patrol to be entirely instrumental. They’re eyeing a 2015 release, and don’t seem to be in any rush, so I wouldn’t be surprised if the plans changed somewhat along the way. But the good news is The Glasspack are back and looking to wreak havoc once more.

Get the full story below:

THE GLASSPACK V: “MOON PATROL”

After nearly three years of hiatus, the Glasspack (formed 1999 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA) is active once again and finishing up writing their 5th full-length record.

The Glasspack’s last release was the “If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say…” single of 2010. This release was a one-off product for Noise Pollution Records of Louisville, split with Louisville band the Trophy Wives, and produced on orange 7-inch vinyl. Along with the vinyl came a free download card for unreleased Glasspack material which included part of the Glasspack’s sold-out headlining performance at the 2008 Roadburn Festival Afterburner in Tilburg, Holland in support of the Glasspack’s 2007 full-length release, “Dirty Women,” on Small Stone Records of Detroit.

The new Glasspack full-length record will likely be entitled “Moon Patrol.” It is also very likely to be all instrumental tracks with no vocals. Instead, the band wishes to focus on and emphasis sonic psychedelic exploration in heavy Glasspack fashion. It is no surprise looking back at prior Glasspack releases that bands such as Hawkwind, Chrome, Monster Magnet, and even Pink Floyd have played parts of inspiration for the band. Have a listen to Glasspack tracks “Jim Beam and Good Green,” “Louisiana Strawberry,” and “If You Don’t have Anything Nice to Say…” to get a feel of the possible direction the band is heading into now.

Johnson has stated that the record “will be less punk and a little slower than usual, but just as brutal and fuzzy. What will be different mostly is the complexity of the songs. We are looking to humble ourselves, the band, and others who listen with the sublime fear of psychedelia, not that happy hippy shit.”

The band has stated that the release will take some time, will be done right, and with 100% artistic direction in every way by the band members. The band has no potential record label in mind yet and is prepared to release the record itself if need be. There is even talk of it possibly being free. The bands believe release will be sometime in 2015. Most of the writing work is already finished.

In spring of this year while relocating in Louisville, Johnson retrieved his guitar equipment from storage, as well as the Glasspack’s extensive library (which has recently become part of the University of Louisville archives department). Johnson has stated, “I was moving all my stuff for the first time in a decade or two to under one roof. There was the Glasspack’s library and there was the old red bastard of an American Telecaster that a few years ago I sort of considered cursed. One day I was bored, picked up the Tele, and told myself ‘no Glasspack riffs,’ but that is exactly what came out. Only this time, the riffs were new and different. Most importantly, they were fun, powerful, and ‘Glasspack worthy.’ I told a couple friends that I would jam and all of a sudden, it seemed like everyone close to me wanted to do the Glasspack or hear new Glasspack. So, I started thinking.”

“Then, Nick Hall came over. He was the lead guitarist for the Glasspack before hiatus in 2010. He played lead guitar and synth keys on ‘If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say…” We jammed at my home and it was amazing. Nick is a trained musician and words cannot describe just how great he is. I had once tried to describe him as Frank Zappa, Robert Fripp, and Eddie Hazel rolled into one and though this is true in a sense, he is even more than that. He makes the Glasspack fun, complex, and fresh, and ten times more powerful. Just see the Noise Pollution single from 2010. After jamming, we decided it was time to act.”

“Before hiatus Nick and I had discussed my desire to one day make an instrumental space-rock record for the Glasspack. Nick had not forgotten and was all for bringing this idea to back to life. This idea had stemmed from the beginning of the Glasspack. I initially in 1999 had two ideas and band names: ‘the Glasspack’ and “Moon Patrol.” The Glasspack is the Glasspack, but the other was intended to be mutually exclusive from the idea of the Glasspack. It was to be a space rock band. I obviously went with the Glasspack. However, I now know that the only constant in this universe is change and that which is will one day become that which it is not, if it is to survive at all. It is inevitable. Therefore, the Glasspack is back, it will change, and change for the better because I will let it now. Moreover, there was always a hint of space-rock in the Glasspack anyway.”

The Glasspack will release more information on the upcoming album soon. The full band for the release is as follows:

“Dirty” Dave Johnson – vox, guitars (Decline Effect, Muddy Nasty River, and Dirty Bird)
Nicolas Hall – lead guitars, synth keys (Graffiti, Zach Longoria Project)
Rodney Roads – guitars, bass (The Hookers, Brothers of Conquest, Blade of the Ripper, and Purple Jesus)
Billy Lease – guitars, bass (Graffiti, Zach Longoria Project, and The Broken Spurs)
Mark Campbell – drums, percussions (Muddy Nasty River, Purple Jesus, Opposable Thumbs, and Strike City)

https://www.facebook.com/theGlasspack
http://www.youtube.com/user/theglasspack
http://theglasspackkentucky.blogspot.com/

The Glasspack, “If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say…”

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The Obelisk Radio Adds: All Them Witches, Rainbows are Free, Idre, Nyarlathotep, Panopticon

Posted in Radio on July 11th, 2014 by JJ Koczan

Click here to listen.

There doesn’t seem to ever be a break with this stuff. 16 records joined The Obelisk Radio playlist today, and that’s still got me behind on checking out more to add. I don’t know what the state of that hard drive is, but I might not be far off from needing to add a second one. It’s become an archive for me.

Diligent and admirable bastard that he is, Slevin is working on an automatically refreshing script that will allow listeners to see what was played over the last 24 hours, which will be a big help if a file is missing its ID3 tags — that being how the player identifies the songs — as I know things sometimes are. I get asked regularly what was played at a specific time, so hopefully this will be able to answer that question.

So things are in the works, but of course there’s a ton of music to talk about in the meantime, and that’s the fun part anyway.

The Obelisk Radio Adds for July 11, 2014:

All Them Witches, Effervescent EP

There are at least two distinct jams at work in the 25-minute single track that makes up Effervescent, the 2014 EP from Nashville psych-blues rockers All Them Witches. The Fender Rhodes of Allan Van Cleave and airy guitar of Ben McLeod feature heavily in both, as bassist Michael Parks, Jr., and drummer Robby Staebler (interview here) provide a foundation on which to space out, and the two pieces find a bridge in hypnotic, psychedelic stretching and backwards noise beginning at around 13 minutes in before building back up. All throughout, the vibe is central, there is movement, and the four-piece demonstrate that the chemistry they showed burgeoning on last year’s brilliant Lightning at the Door (discussed here) was no fluke, but the beginning of a grand and creative exploration that finds its next installment here. It may be a stopgap — formerly their primary means of release, they’ve recently pulled their full-lengths down from Bandcamp; one expects big, got-signed-type news from them at any moment — but Effervescent is fluid and rich, and as deep as you want to go in listening to it, it’s willing to take you there and further. All Them Witches on Thee Facebooks, on Bandcamp.

Nyarlathotep, The Shadow over Innsmouth

Some six years after releasing their initial The End is Always Near demo, New Jersey black metal outfit (whom, in the interest of full disclosure, I know personally) Nyarlathotep follow-up with the Lovecraftian full-length, The Shadow over Innsmouth. Based around the  short story of the same name, the album breaks down into five extended tracks plus an intro of rage-fueled atmospherics. Using programmed drums to their advantage on “Old Zadok Allen” — the only proper song here under 10 minutes — they add an industrial feel with a keyboard-led midsection backed by vague, ambient screams. The density in the material is striking, but even at their most unbridled — as on the blasting, solo-topped early moments in the title-track — Nyarlathotep hold their commitment to setting a mood firm, and the blown-out, distorted soundscape they create across the release is grim and otherworldly enough to be worthy of its subject matter. It is a complex, biting execution that won’t be for everyone, but that seethes in its quiet parts and gnashes its pointed teeth with monstrous force. Nyarlathotep on Thee Facebooks, on Bandcamp.

Idre, Idre


Oklahoma City trio Idre specialize in ambient fluidity and deeply-weighted tonal crush. Their self-released, self-titled debut long-player is comprised of two extended cuts — “Factorie” (26:41) and “Witch Trial” (13:17) — that each impress with their patience, their impact and their ability to contrast the generally claustrophobic feel of post-metal with an open-spaced, salt-of-the-earth pulse. Within its first 10 minutes, “Factorie” has moved from undulating waves of riffing to vast, strumming, Across Tundras-esque roll, and never does it seem to be meandering without purpose in the noisy stages to come. It builds and collapses, and when they seem the most gone, the clean, twanging vocals return to finish out, leading to the parabolically constructed “Witch Trial,” which marries Earth-style drone and galloping drums effectively to create a decidedly Western feel while still building toward, and eventually moving through a sonically pummeling apex. Once again, vocals are sparse, but perfectly placed almost as if to remind the listener of how small a human being can be in so wide a space as the Midwest. Like that landlocked region, Idre‘s Idre is expansive and lets you see for miles. Idre on Thee Facebooks, on Bandcamp.

Rainbows are Free, Waves ahead of the Ocean

Led by the substantial pipes of vocalist B. Fain Kistler, Norman, Oklahoma, four-piece Rainbows are Free seem keen on finding the place where classic doom and heavy rock meet, and on their second full-length, Waves ahead of the Ocean (released by Guestroom Records), they just about get there. Kistler is a singer worthy of comparison to Grand MagusJB Christoffersson, but Rainbows are Free are less grandiose overall, early songs like “The Botanist,” the title-track and the cumbersomely-titled opener “Speed God and the Rise of the Motherfuckers from a Place beyond Hell” nestling into heavy, engaging grooves marked out by the choice riffing of Richie Tarver, the bass work of Chad Hogue and drums of Bobby Onspaugh. Unpretentious and professional in their presentation, they doom up an otherwise Clutch-style boogie in “Cadillac” before going full-on trad metal in “Snake Bitten by Love,” and ably making their way through a Dio Sabbath push on “Burn and Die,” which works well despite feeling a long way from the upbeat rockin’ of earlier highlight “Sonic Demon” and leads smoothly into closer “Comet,” the six-and-a-half-minute spacier thrust of which seems to be seems to be where Rainbows are Free most choose to harken to the psychedelia one might expect from their moniker. They most drive toward the epic in their finale, and the payoff there is churning and insistent in a way that more than justifies the song’s position on the 37-minute record, but even then have a keen eye for structure and holding the attention of their audience. An impeccably put together album from a band more than ready to turn heads. Rainbows are Free on Thee Facebooks, Guestroom Records on Bandcamp.

Panopticon, Roads to the North


Despite the bluegrass influence and liberal inclusion of banjo amidst its blackened onslaught, Panopticon‘s Roads to the North (released on Bindrune) is perhaps most American of all for its pulling together seemingly disparate elements in defiance of European traditionalism. Billed as and creating the standard for American folk metal, it nonetheless is in conversation with European black metal — a conversation that in my head looks something like it’s being chased à la Benny Hill for its heresies — while purposefully working against its tenets. Roads to the North is the fifth full-length from the one-man project of Kentucky’s Austin Lunn, and made in collaboration with Krallice‘s Colin Marston (among others), it elicits a sprawl through both its metallic extremity and its devotion to the aesthetic it pioneers. It makes for a heady 74-minute listen, but Panopticon are cohesive throughout — five records deep, they should be — and one doesn’t embark on an album like Roads to the North lightly or without wanting full immersion into an evocative and blistering landscape. That’s just what you get. Panopticon on Thee Facebooks, Bindrune Recordings.

For the full list of albums added to The Obelisk Radio this week and to see the latest updates, click here.

Thanks for reading and listening.

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audiObelisk: Black God Premiere “Washington” from New EP Three

Posted in audiObelisk on September 30th, 2013 by JJ Koczan

Unsurprisingly, the six-song Three is the third in a series of No Idea Records EPs from Louisville, Kentucky, noise punkers Black God, whose affinity for subversion bleeds into every one of the new release’s 10 minutes. That’s right. 10 minutes, six songs. The longest cut on Three is opener (immediate points) “Ghost in You,” which hits two minutes on the dog, but everything else is a straight A-to-B shot of efficient and conscious aggression. They are not a band who doesn’t know why they’re angry. Comprised of vocalist Rob Pennington (By the Grace of God, Black Cross), guitarist Ryan Patterson (Black Cross, Coliseum, The National Acrobat), bassist Nick Thieneman (Black Cross, Breather Resist, Young Widows) and drummer Ben Sears (Prideswallower, Mountain Asleep), Black God draws on the decades of experience of its members to craft a sound that’s bullshit free and laser focused.

Yet like the best of the Louisville hardcore scene from whence it comes, Three still sounds natural and not at all over-produced. Its social commentary comes across not as pretentious ramblings that assume ignorance on the part of its audience, but as a classical populism that’s managed to avoid being coopted by corporate influence. The songs — which are what really matters — are fast and aggressive, but not at all without swing or groove, whether it’s the initial rush of “Ghost in You” or the more winding guitar-led “The Trick.” Even closer “Won’t Kiss the Ring” — the shortest track at 1:30 — holds firm to a sensibility that doesn’t sacrifice flow to pissed-offery, rounding out Three with quick gang vocals that call to mind the earlier catchiness of “Washington.”

Blink and you’ll miss it, but “Washington,” as the start of the second half of the release is among its highlight moments, with two strong hooks and no letup in the intensity of the first three pieces. Pennington‘s vocals are have a classic punk edge but are clean and discernible, and the steady thud of Sears‘ drums gives a forceful shove and bounce to verse and chorus alike. The call and response chorus, “In Washington/The night creeps in,” is a defining moment of Three, and true to the no-frills ethic they’ve proffered to this point, once they’re done, they don’t waste any time in cutting right into the subsequent “Womb to Knife.”

Today I have the pleasure of featuring “Washington” as a stream from Three, maybe as a way to mark the impending US government shutdown (which if it weren’t for all the workers and poor people getting shit on might actually be a good thing) or maybe just to wake up at the start of the week. Either way, find it on the player below, and please enjoy:

Black God‘s Three is available now on 7″ from No Idea Records in a variety of limited colors. More info at the links below.

Black God on Thee Facebooks

No Idea Records

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The Obelisk Radio Add of the Week: The Decline Effect, The Decline Effect

Posted in Radio on September 4th, 2013 by JJ Koczan

In science, the “decline effect” refers to once-supported claims or theories being seen as less true over time. Louisville, Kentucky, sludge punkers The Decline Effect take that notion and, on their self-titled 28:48 Records debut LP, make the obvious philosophical leap with it: What was true before is not true now, and vice versa. Or at very least that that’s where we’re headed. Melt that down in a hot vat of frill-less hardcore punk and riff-led fuckall, and The Decline Effect‘s The Decline Effect gradually begins to take shape, songs like the opener “Swine,” “Drone” and “Superstructure” metering out frustrations to whatever ears will be so bold as to listen.

Along with exploring the long-since-consummated unions between rock and punk and between punk and politics, the 29 minutes of The Decline Effect finds nuance in moments like the Iron Maiden-gone-garage opening progression of “I.N.S.” and the catchy proto-grunge of “Serpent to Slay.” Some might recognize vocalist “Dirty” Dave Johnson from his work in Louisville heavy rockers The Glasspack, though as he’s partnered here with guitarist Mark Abromavage (ex-Kinghorse), bassist Chris Abromavage and drummer Jae Brown, the resulting style across these nine songs is far less blues-based. Rawer and meaner, The Decline Effect backs up its attitude with high-efficiency thrust, the insistent sneer of “Divide and Conquer” meeting groovier contrast in the slower “Bulletproof,” which gives the bass more space to shine through the raw but not underproduced mix.

“Drone” touches on melody with vocal layering but ultimately runs it over with a motoring riff. That’s not The Decline Effect‘s trip anyway. They keep to the pummel, do it well and do it quick, and are in and out smartly in under half an hour. I don’t know if it’s an album to incite a riot, but there aren’t many who pull of grown-up punk this well without sounding either redundant or exhausted. The anger on the catchy “Sleeping Giant” feels genuine, and closer “Bodies” shows some emerging dynamic in tempo shifts that ties the record together surprisingly neatly considering how jagged parts of it can be.

28:48 has The Decline Effect out in a couple different vinyl versions, and you can hear it now in rotation on The Obelisk Radio‘s ever-expanding playlist, as well as get a taste and/or buy a download from the Bandcamp player below:

The Decline Effect, The Decline Effect (2013)

The Decline Effect on Thee Facebooks

The Decline Effect on Bandcamp

28:48 Records

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