Mos Generator & Void Vator to Release Covering Queen Split 7″ on July 31

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

With the ready confession that I’m a sucker for such things, you pretty much had me at ‘ Law Assignment Help Uk - work with our writers to get the top-notch report meeting the requirements Fast and trustworthy services from industry leading Mos Generator cover.’ There are few who dig as deep into ’70s aficionadodom as customs and traditions of great britain essay Att Cell Phone Business Plans Uk division and classification essay thesis 4th grade essay writing worksheets Tony Reed, so when it comes to picking tracks to take on with his band (or on his own, as he’s also done), he knows what he’s doing. That’s not to take away from We can guarantee best quality research papers in our custom writing service that includes best writers and researchers. Buy change over time essay fast and Void Vator, who share the other half of the double-A side Some people claim that not enough of the waste from homes is recycled Order your unique Buy Essays Online Usa and accurately written student Covering Queen 7″ due out July 31 on Best essay editing service at your disposal. So, no more need to look for http://russianchicagomag.com/assessment-for-learning-essay-help/ — you’ve got all you need right here, right now. H42 Records. The Los Angeles classic metallers issued their College Essays Nursing - All sorts of academic writings & custom papers. put out a little time and money to receive the paper you could not even dream about leave Stranded full-length through Essay Assignment Help - Instead of wasting time in unproductive attempts, receive professional assistance here #1 reliable and trustworthy Ripple last year, and if the sharpness of their logo doesn’t clue you into the kind of bite on offer, I suggest you find an online class in thrash history to take. There has to be one somewhere, and if it’s not taught by Professional English editing and research proposal questions examples available 24/7. Jim Durkin from Get http://devlopment.sulphurtechnologies.com/wp-content/?a-paper-writing from American writers with world-class 24/7 support through Ultius. Read actual samples, customer reviews and explore Dark Angel, it should be.

How does one become a degree-granting institution, anyhow?

Sorry, sidetracked. Here’s PR wire info about the split:

mos generator son and daughter

void vator tie your mother down

MOS GENERATOR & VOID VATOR Split-7″ vinyl COVERING QUEEN

Despite corona we are still working on the upcoming releases. On July 31st there comes a new small piece of plastic that you have all been waiting for, even if you don’t know it yet.

The release will take place in collaboration with RIPPLE MUSIC with whom we have successfully often collaborated over the past few years. Therefore, in addition to the H42 RECORDS edition, there will also be a Ripple Music Edition produced only for the US market.

Two great american bands each cover a song by one of our favorite bands: QUEEN

This release will not make any prisoners – look forward to two great interpretations of classic Queen songs!

We were actually always the opinion that you shouldn’t cover any Queen song. But after we heard the master of the split 7″-vinyl, we are converted! Great punchy versions are waiting for you …. let yourself be surprised and “let me entertain YOU”!

RELEASE JULY 31st in different editions

EU H42 Records Edition on clear vinyl (ltd. 60 with OBI) H42-066
US Ripple Records Edition on gold vinyln (ltd. 60 with OBI) H42-066
EU Retail Edition on white vinyl (with OBI) H42-066
Retail Edition on black vinyl (with OBI) H42-066
PRESALE JUNE 19th over H42 Records

Side A ‘Son & Daughter’
(original by Queen, B. May, 1973)
TONY REED / Guitar, vocals
SCOOTER HASLIP / Bass
JONO GARRETT / Drums

Side AA ‘Tie Your Mother Down’
(original by Queen, B. May, 1976)
LUCAS KANOPA (guitar, vocals)
ERIK KLUIBER (guitar)
GERMAN MOURA (drums)
SAM HARMAN (bass)

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Mos Generator & Void Vator, Covering Queen split teaser

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Circle of Sighs Premiere Video for Kraftwerk Cover “The Man Machine”; Debut Album Salo out June 19

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

circle of sighs

It is inevitable that the death of an artist brings out tributes, but the truth of the matter is  comment ecrire une dissertation critique http://rahimbakhshighschool.edu.bd/resume-writing-service-york-pa/ dissertation on critical comprehension skills essay on my house in french Circle of Sighs both recorded and put together the video for the  Search for Automotive http://cheapessaywritings24.com/buy-admission-essay/ jobs at Monster. Browse our collection of Automotive Service Writer job listings, including openings in full time and Kraftwerk cover “The Man Machine” before the recent passing of synth-pop pioneer Order Term or Professional Custom Essay Writing Service in any style (APA, MLA, Turabian), on any subjects you need. ?24/7 Support, ??Full Confidentiality, 100% Florian Schneider. Timely then, in a kind of unfortunate way.  sample thesis statement for compare and contrast essay http://www.abatec.cz/?childrens-literature-review an expository essay reputable essay writing services Circle of Sighs — a trio, if I discern the horned and masked figures in the photo above correctly — will release their debut full-length,  Tell us “write my essay for me” Our company provides Essay Disobeying Lawful Order to students in very many subjects. Before examining the quality of our services Salo, on June 19 through If they really think that I need help writing an essay even ready to pay for essay writing and are sure that I have to Essay Checking Service Glasgow for me, Pillars of Creation Records, and sure enough the cover isn’t the only track on the nine-cut/52-minute cosmic cult doom offering to make use of keys or pop influences. “Hold Me Lucifer” is catchy and melodic to go with its weighted chug and overarchingly grim atmosphere, and though it gives over to a rousing vocal duet and more guitar-led fare and some harsh screams that call to mind a connection with Los Angeles’ High Priestess, whose Katie Gilchrest mixed, the beginning of “Desolate,” the intro to “Unicorn Magic” and the segue that follows (the third of three on the album) all utilize synth in considerable fashion. Likewise the closing title-track. At the same time, the nine-minute “Kukeri” follows a linear progression building from acoustic guitar to a progressive metal apex and dropping back again, so from opener “Burden of the Flesh” onward, the proceedings are hardly staid or repetitive as varying arrangement elements and moods come and go.

The three segues help build a full-length flow between some of these shifts of intention, but it is up to the songs themselves to ensnare the listener, and that’s done with an immersive depth of mix and an abiding art rock weirdness that, given the band’scircle of sighs salo imagery, one can’t help but relate to earliest Ufomammut or even a more doomed vision of California’s Sleepytime Gorilla Museum, whose progressive bent eventually consumed them and sent them into a universe unknown (actually other bands), but for Circle of Sighs, their commitment to heavy, crunching riffing and the other aesthetic elements at play throughout Salo may indeed save them from that grim fate in the longer term. That is, while Salo is a lot to keep up with, the foundation Circle of Sighs are building in their songwriting feels solid enough for them to work from going forward. There is a complex thought process playing out in this material. It is not haphazard when the keys return four minutes into “Desolate.” The title-track, safely tucked away after the 10-minute “Unicorn Magic/Segue-03” one-two, makes an attempt to tie everything together with progressive guitar and keyboards and electronic beats, and though it succeeds to some degree, there’s of course more left to be said. One suspects that perhaps that’s intentional as well.

But what unfolds across the broad path to get to that moment of closure is strange, purposeful and consuming enough to be considered progressive. On first listen, Salo plays out as a kind of wash of intent — it almost buries you in it — but subsequent playthroughs gradually reveal the nuance of the ceremony at work and the human drive for expression underlying what might seem at first to be otherworldly chaos. Left to their own figurative and literal devices, one suspects the blend of styles at work in these songs will continue to meld, reshape, be added to and subtracted from over time, as nothing here feels permanent in a “this is how it’s gonna be” kind of sense, aside maybe from the weirdness. It’s gonna be weird, and so much the better.

To be perfectly honest with you, I’m not sure if the below is a premiere or not. I tagged it as one above, and I don’t think anyone’s going to fight me on it, but I think maybe it’s been shared already. If that’s the case, sorry to mislead. These are confusing times and, well, I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer to start with. So, you know. Apologies if you’ve been mislead. One way or the other, though, in visual and aural cues, Circle of Sighs‘ take on Kraftwerk offers a look a the band’s project as regards their debut album and perhaps their larger mission too. We’ll see about that over time, I suppose.

Until then, I hope you enjoy “The Man Machine”:

Circle of Sighs, “The Man Machine” official video

Occult-themed synth-doom collective Circle of Sighs comes wrapped in a veil of mystery. Their anonymity is by design. In today’s age of hyperinformation, the group prefers that the music takes the forefront (as well as the visuals that are a key component to their work). Thus, dear reader, you will not be getting soundbites. All we can offer is some vital information and a bit of history.

Their work began in 2018, as rough demo recordings were hewn by clandestine shamans and cosmonauts on a sub-rosa mission to merge the celestial and the terrestrial. The result of their effort was an album of existential heaviness that pitted synthesis against nature: Digital beats, downtuned riffs, harsh keyboards, and warm tube amps. Their genre-bending and -blending dredges the uncanny valley to cull a sound both strange and familiar.

For those willing to wait comes Salo. The nine-song opus, available on CD, cassette and digital download from Pillars of Creation Records on June 19th, is a fully realized work from a band that cut no corners to achieve exactly what they set out to do: In short, redefine metal. As evidence, look no further than the lead-off single, ‘The Man Machine.’ Their dystopian spin on the Kraftwerk classic pairs trudging doom guitars with ambient synths and vocoder harmonies, captured in a video that recalls the after-hours programming of mid-1980s MTV.

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Circle of Sighs on Instagram

Circle of Sighs on Bandcamp

Circle of Sighs website

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Pillars of Creation Records store

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Alain Johannes Announces Hum out July 31; Title-Track Video Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Alain Johannes (Tom Bronowski)

I don’t usually phrase things this way, but Alain JohannesHum is basically the record I’ve wanted Queens of the Stone Age to make since Lullabies to Paralyze and the record I’ve wanted Masters of Reality to make since Give Us Barabbas, so let’s say for the last 15 years-plus. God I’m old. Anyway, Hum is out July 31 on Ipecac Recordings and if you want to get a glimpse at the vibe of the thing, the video for the title-track is at the bottom of this post.

My recommendation is you dig into that and expect a reward of organic, desert-hued, finger-plucked bliss — “Hum” isn’t the only instance of it on the record, which varies in arrangement and dives into and out of psychedelic resonance, but it’s a highlight — and then go ahead and get your preorder in because gawd only knows what the world is going to look like by July so you might as well have something to look forward to in the mail.

I’m gonna go back in the meantime and listen to Johannes‘ other solo stuff, as clearly I have some catching up to do.

You go ahead and enjoy:

Alain Johannes Hum

ALAIN JOHANNES RELEASES HUM ON JULY 31 VIA IPECAC RECORDINGS

https://lnkfi.re/AJHum

Alain Johannes, co-creator of the highly influential ’90s alternative rock band Eleven as well as a key contributor on releases from Queens of the Stone Age, Them Crooked Vultures and Chris Cornell, releases Hum, his third solo album, on July 31 via Ipecac Recordings.

“It’s more about me than probably any album I’ve ever done,” says Johannes about the collection that follows a period of tragic loss, extreme illness and rebirth. “It was something I was striving for and needed to communicate. Coming out of a difficult period, I was liberated. I had lost people who were very close to me. I went through struggles with my own health. There’s a personal energy behind the way it was recorded and the feel of the songs. It’s a document of my life right now.”

Johannes is seen playing the album’s title track in a video released this morning. The clip, which showcases Johannes performing the song in the woods near his Los Angeles home, was shot by Frank McDonough and edited by Felo Foncea.

“You can think of the album title, Hum, a few ways,” adds Johannes. “Of course, there’s a musical hum. There’s an electrical hum. To me, it suggests a sense of mystery. When you stop and listen to silence in nature, the hum is underneath the threshold of hearing. It’s a mysterious and magical sense of something existing, beautiful, and alive. It’s a blanket word for the sound of the ether—something that’s always been there, always will be there, and everything comes from it. It’s the common connection to everything.” Album pre-orders, which include an instant download of “Hum,” are available now: https://lnkfi.re/AJHum.

Hum track list:
Mermaids’ Scream
Hum
Hallowed Bones
Someone
If Morning Comes
Free
Sealed
Here In The Silence
Nine
Finis

Alainjohannes.com
Alainjohannes.eu
Facebook.com/alainjohannesmusic
Instagram.com/alainjohannes
Instagram.com/alainjohannestour
https://blixtmerchandise.shop/ipecac-music-store

Alain Johannes, “Hum” official video

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Snail Post “Nothing Left for You” Video; New Single out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

snail

New Snail video, you say? Don’t mind if I do, thanks. The timing certainly works, as the Pacific Coast — Seattle-ish and Los Angeles — three-piece have newly issued the single Nothing Left for You/Fearless, with the second cut being a cover of Meddle-era Pink Floyd and the first cut being their first recording since later-2015’s Feral (review here). They hit the studio in January to get going on their next long-player, and while “Nothing Left for You” will feature on that album, it’s hard to know how representative it might be of the upcoming-at-some-point batch of material either way, but it does find them making some interesting turns in sound, with some of the raw buzz one might find in their 1993 self-titled debut (review here) resurfacing along with the speedier groove than one has come to expect. It’s also catchy as hell, so if I haven’t said this before about it — and I’m pretty sure I have — I’m glad to take it as it comes.

They are right at home in “Fearless” as well, with guitarist Mark Johnson‘s dreamy vocal melody floating out over his own watery effects, backed by bassist/recording engineer Matt Lynch with drummer Marty Dodson keeping the groove grounded and rolling forward. As much as “Nothing Left for You” is about shove — and particularly ‘shove-away,’ in terms of its lyrical theme — Snail make “Fearless” into a deep-dive melodic showcase, emphasizing not only the influence of Pink Floyd, but the grittier, and weightier edge they bring to what was already there. Both songs end with a fadeout, and the underlying message of the release is clearly that there’s more to follow, and as a fan of the band, I can only look forward to the next album whenever it might arrive. Everyone’s plans being shot as they are this year, I wouldn’t hazard a guess as to when something might manifest, but in the interim, the video for “Nothing Left for You” has some fun with being stuck at home during quarantine, and again, I’ll take it as it comes.

And it bears mentioning that Lynch mixed and mastered Nothing Left for You/Fearless at his Mysterious Mammal Recordings in L.A. (they tracked at All Welcome Records) and as discussed in his days of rona, he’s up for mixing whatever you’ve got and is looking for remote clients. When I finally get to recording that spoken word/keyboard drone album, I’ll definitely be sending it to him to edit out the burps.

Enjoy the video:

Snail, “Nothing Left for You” official video

From the single Nothing Left For You / Fearless released 5/1/2020. Get your copy here: https://snailhq.bandcamp.com/

Video edited and produced by Matt Lynch. Music by Snail (Mark Johnson, Matt Lynch, Marty Dodson)

Recorded by Matt Lynch at All Welcome Records, Los Angeles USA. Mixed and mastered by Matt Lynch at Mysterious Mammal Recordings Los Angeles. Additional recording by Mark Johnson at home in Seattle. Engineered by Jennifer Hendrix.

Snail is:
Matt Lynch (Bass/Vocals)
Marty Dodson (Drums)
Mark Johnson (Lead Vocals/Guitar)

Snail, Nothing Left for You / Fearless (2020)

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Album Review: High Priestess, Casting the Circle

Posted in Reviews on May 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

high priestess casting the circle

With an ambitious intent behind them, Los Angeles trio High Priestess follow-up their well-received 2018 self-titled debut (review here) with Casting the Circle, their second LP for Ripple Music. Produced, engineered, mixed and mastered by guitarist/vocalist/keyboardist Katie Gilchrest, the 42-minute/five-track outing moves from invoking the four elements — earth, air, fire, water — on its leadoff title-track to finishing with incantations praising the devil on “Ave Satanas,” and all the while in between flowing in linear fashion as one ritual playing out. It is a whole work brought together by Gilchrest, bassist/vocalist Mariana Fiel and drummer/vocalist Megan Mullins, and while a song like centerpiece “The Hourglass” or even the nine-minute “Erebus” might work on its own outside the context of its surroundings, the bulk of the offering is clearly intended to be experienced whole, those tracks included. The signal for that intention comes right in “Casting the Circle” itself, which though it runs at a little over five minutes long, is basically an introduction to the proceedings as the band gets underway.

The elements are indeed introduced, both in terms of folklore and in the context of the band’s own sound: vocals are harmonized and lush in their melody, tones are weighted, and what will become a key factor throughout all of Casting the Circle is first unveiled in the patience with which they execute the track. It’s worth repeating: patience. Casting the Circle is methodical in its execution from front to back, and though there are parts that are quicker than others — some of the classic-prog quirk that surfaces led by the keys and drums in “Invocation” has tempo enough, and “The Hourglass” moves at a relatively middling pace — the bulk of the album’s hypnosis is cast through its ability to maintain a crawling pace to go along with the atmospheric depth in the mix and the expansive vocal arrangements between Gilchrest, Fiel and Mullins, which are fast becoming a signature of High Priestess‘ work and an aspect of their sound that stands them out from any cult-minded peers that may be likewise spellcasting in the underground.

“Invocation” is an inevitable focal point for Casting the Circle, as it follows the opener, “Erebus” and “The Hourglass” and runs a full 17-plus minutes and provides the essence of the ritual that High Priestess are undertaking. With nods toward the likes of Black Widow and Coven and other such cultists of yore, High Priestess put a modern doom spin on the classic trope of communion with things otherworldly and dark in origin. And whether you’re the type to buy in on such things or not, the effect is sweeping and engrossing — a testament to and foremost example of the achievement of Casting the Circle itself. With the mood set by “Casting the Circle” and “Erebus” and the momentary come-to-ground chorus of “The Hourglass” prior, “Invocation” arrives as the penultimate track, as the apex of the proceedings and as a culmination of the record’s purpose — as well as, on a more terrestrial level, the bulk of side B — and feels very much like the center around which the rest of the album was built.

high priestess

Lines like “Praise your god and feel him/Praise your god in heaven” become memorable early incantations accompanied by winding lines of guitar and keys and percussion, and a forward build is set in motion as the volume gradually increases and Gilchrest rips into a massive highlight solo around the five-minute mark. At about halfway through, the tempo cuts and a march is undertaken with keyboards pushed forward behind the vocals in righteously doomed fashion as the next movement is reached. Cymbals wash out and a spell is spoken over drums as the guitar lurches back to life with the bass rumbling beneath all the while. Another solo brings the transition to an interplay between guitar and soaring melodic vocals, and a brief return to the earlier winding figure is accompanied by whispers in urgent fashion as the whole thing seems to come apart just past 14 minutes in before the mega-plod of the halfway point is resumed as a final movement, deconstructed to echoing voices, keyboard noise, feedback, manic drums, and a few final measures of lumber before fading church organ leads the transition into silence just ahead of the voice that begins “Ave Satanas” with its titular evocation.

At just three minutes long, “Ave Satanas” is a culmination unto itself. Done completely a cappella, it weaves layers of vocals over each other to create an effect no less immersive than was that of the various guitar, bass, drums and keys before it, and after creating this wash of melody, it simply casts out a final line and recedes into silence, High Priestess having obviously made their statement and pushed as far into the ether as they’re at this point willing to go. In that, Casting the Circle succeeds roundly in its ambient purpose, using harmonies and slower tempos in order not just to capture the willing listener’s attention, but to affect the mood and atmosphere in which the work itself is heard.

The theatrical vibe that Gilchrest, Fiel and Mullins bring to that work through their vocal arrangements only enhance that mood and give the record further depth, and as they turn their intentions toward darker conjurations, it feels all the more like they’re beginning to realize the vision with which they set out initially and though the likes of “Invocation” would seem to set them on a one-song-album path, I’m not sure if they’ll actually take that route or perhaps, having fulfilled the LP-as-ritual impulse here, take their transcendental doom elsewhere. One way or the other, their play toward classic genre elements is gracefully and pointedly modern in its manifestation, and they do not come out the other side of Casting the Circle sounding like anyone so much as themselves. This is, perhaps, who High Priestess have intended to be since they started out with their demo (review here) some three years ago, and if that’s the case, their ability to recast stylistic nuances to suit the needs of their material is all the more encouraging as they continue forward to yet-unknown places.

High Priestess, Casting the Circle

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High Priestess on Instagram

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Ripple Music website

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Snail to Issue Nothing Left for You / Fearless Single This Friday

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 29th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

snail

The new original track buzzes with a neo-psych edge that Snail‘s never quite shown in this way before, and the B-side is a take on Meddle-era Pink Floyd, so yes, the first new music from Snail in a whopping half-decade is welcome. Nothing Left for You / Fearless comes topped off with artwork by Sean “Skillit” McEleny and is intended as something of a precursor to the next Snail long-player, which the band reports is already mostly done. That’s good news too, frankly, since it’s going on five years since 2015’s Feral (review here) and that means they’re certainly due. “Nothing Left for You” bodes well of what that album might portend tonally — it doesn’t quite drift, but the guitars seem to have loosed some heft in favor of shimmer and that’s interesting to hear from a band whose trade has been psych-through-lumber for so long.

Fascinating, as Spock would say.

He’d also say you should check it out on Friday when it’s released. No, I don’t know what day it is, but I know it’s not Friday because the song isn’t on their Bandcamp yet. That’s all I’ve got to go on.

Well, that and this from the PR wire:

snail nothing left for you fearless

Snail to Release First New Music in Six Years

Snail will release their first new music since 2014’s Feral on May 1, 2020. “Nothing Left For You,” the advanced single from their forthcoming as-yet-untitled LP, will be accompanied by a cover of Pink Floyd’s “Fearless”. This is only the second time Snail has recorded a cover song in its 27-year existence. The two songs will be available as a digital-only download from Bandcamp. “Nothing Left For You” will appear on the LP in physical form in the future, but “Fearless” will be an exclusive digital release.

“Nothing Left For You” is a particularly vicious rant against an unnamed entity. It’s fuzzy, driving, and pissed off.

Says Snail: “We’ve all had someone or something in our lives that were just toxic, and no amount of expended energy could turn that around. This song is a final kiss-off; a cathartic, scathing take down that is sometimes necessary to move past a relationship and regain a sense of self and power.”

Why cover “Fearless”? “Having been Floyd fans forever, we have been talking about doing that tune for 25 years. It’s a great song, and seemed open for a heavy interpretation. When writing “Nothing Left For You,” I actually used some characters from “Fearless” in the lyrics, so it only made sense to pair these two and finally realize the vision,” says Matt Lynch, bassist/producer.

Snail’s full length LP is currently in the overdub and mixing stage, and should be ready for release in the summer. The band recorded enough material back in January to complete an EP as well, so watch the newswire for updates.

SNAIL:
Marty Dodson – Drums and Percussion
Mark Johnson – Guitar and Lead Vocals
Matt Lynch – Bass, Keys and Vocals

Artwork by Skillit.

www.snailhq.com
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Snail, “Nothing Left for You” drum recording

Snail, Feral (2015)

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Days of Rona: Matt Lynch of Snail & Mysterious Mammal Recording

Posted in Features on April 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

snail matt lynch

Days of Rona: Matt Lynch of Snail & Mysterious Mammal Recording (Los Angeles, California)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

So far everyone’s health is good. Mark is convinced that he and his wife had it in late January in Seattle. Of course, this is conjecture but the symptoms matched up. This was before it was even on our radar and no testing but Seattle was the first place it showed up in the States. They are okay now though. I’m in Los Angeles, Mark is in Seattle and Marty is in San Diego, so we don’t play live that often and didn’t have any tour plans yet. We were already in the middle of recording our record and Mark is in the overdub phase up in Seattle so fortunately we are in a good place there. I edit and mix and overdub once Mark is done, so luckily this is something we can continue to do in isolation. I am going to have more time to do this now because I have been laid off from my day job at a travel marketing agency. Not a lot of work going on there, so I’m freed up for mixing and mastering the Snail stuff and finishing Collyn’s Diesel Boots record as well as projects for other artists.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

We are in a shelter-in-place here in Los Angeles. We go out for groceries and to walk our dogs. All non-essential businesses are closed, which means everything except medical, grocery, and media. All the beaches and parks are shut down, including bike and walking paths. They tried to keep them open but there are just too many people here in general and we aren’t great at following rules apparently.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Everything is closed except to get groceries. My job is gone, at least for the time being. Gigs are all cancelled. There have been a lot of cool live streams happening with music though, and the time to enjoy them. A lot of people are coming together virtually in my community, sharing information, helping each other with groceries and where to find them, trading food items among neighbors for recipes. People are cooking more again, playing music as a family – a bit of the old ways are creeping back in, which is a nice positive. It seems that musicians, or the musicians I know anyway, are generally into cooking. I think there is a parallel there of putting individual elements together to make a whole that is stronger than its parts that appeals to musicians.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

I think the most important takeaway from this for me is that this has proven just how fast society can change. We are going to come out on the other side of this to a new normal — it won’t be the same — so now is the time to take stock and decide for yourself what you want that new normal to look like, and work towards making it happen.

https://mysteriousmammal.com/
www.snailhq.com
www.facebook.com/snailhq
https://www.instagram.com/snail_hq/
www.smallstone.com
http://www.facebook.com/smallstonerecords
http://www.smallstone.bandcamp.com

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The Freeks Post “Yesterday’s Sweetheart” Rehearsal Footage with New Lineup

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the freeks 2020 lineup

You know what part I like? I like the part where Ruben Romano plays drums. I like that part. I like the part where Ed Mundell rips a solo while Jonathan Hall holds down the rhythm on guitar. That part is pretty sweet too. I like the part where Ray Piller throws a little funk into the bassline. Oh yeah, and I like that part too where Craig Riggs is on vocals.

I guess what I’m trying to say is I’m on board for hearing more from the new incarnation of Los Angeles-based heavy rockers The Freeks, who were seemingly all set to unveil their five-piece lineup at the L.A. edition of the Heavy Psych Sounds Fest a few nights ago. Obviously that didn’t happen, what with the certainty that there would be more than three people there or however many California has allowed to gather in a single place at the moment.

To be sure, “Yesterday’s Sweetheart” — a new song, at least so far as I know — is a rehearsal. They note as well it was Riggs‘ first time sitting in with the band — one has to wonder as to the logistics of that, if he’s still based in the Boston area, where his bands Kind and the kinda-not-really-semi-active-but-still-put-out-a-killer-record-last-year Roadsaw are, or if he’s gone west, where Sasquatch and now The Freeks are based; hell of a commute, either way — but of course he seems right at home alongside everyone else, even though there apparently aren’t proper lyrics to the song yet. “Hey Riggs, wanna just bust out a killer melody and wing it and we’ll make a video?” “Yeah sure, why not?”

Not many bands would make that choice, let alone pull it off. The Freeks circa 2020 do both. Keep writing, dudes. Write faster. Then record.

You know, as soon as more than three people can legally be in the same space, anyhow.

Enjoy the video:

The Freeks, “Yesterday’s Sweetheart” rehearsal, March 4, 2020

Because a lot of you have asked, we decided to take some rehearsal footage, add in some freeky trees and psychedelia to share with all of you during these times of trouble! Please note, This is a raw rehearsal recording for use as the bands audio review only and was not intended for public video, so, heads are cut off (but not bad for a one camera only edit). This is also Riggs’s first rehearsal with us and he kills it with some improvisational vocality. We hope you dig it as we feel we are putting our guts on the table and exposing our balls for y’all to give us a big kick.

The Freeks are:
Ed Mundell – Guitar
Jonathan Hall – Guitar
Ray Piller – bass
Craig Riggs – vocals
Ruben Romano – Drums

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