Review & Track Premiere: Lowrider, Refractions

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on January 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Lowrider Refractions

[Click play above to stream the premiere of ‘Red River’ from Lowrider’s Refractions. Album is out Feb. 21 on Blues Funeral Recordings with preorders here.]

Peder Bergstrand on “Refractions”:

“’Red River’ has been with us since maybe 2001-2002… It’s the first riff we wrote for our second album, we even recorded it in 2003 — but it just one of those songs that needed to mature to become what it was intended to be. It feels so right that it’s the first one out of the gate from this forever-in-the-making album, and it couldn’t feel more like the perfect amalgamation or Lowrider then and Lowrider now. Absolutely STOKED to share it with you.”

Then and now, it is an elite class to which Lowrider‘s work belongs. Few single albums have helped steer the course of the European heavy underground to the degree of their MeteorCity-issued 2000 debut, Ode to Io (reissue review here). Along with fellow Swedes Dozer, as well as Colour Haze, Orange Goblin and a select group of others from around the continent, they helped pave the path of the emergent stoner rock scene at the turn of the century, taking lessons from California desert heavy and inherently bringing something of their own to the creative process that more than a generation of bands has learned from in their wake. Two key differences between Lowrider and those other bands who made such a mark at the time: they were very young and they only did the one record. Both are crucial when it comes to understanding how their first full-length in 20 years, Refractions — released through Blues Funeral Recordings — manages to sound so vibrant in its 41-minute front-to-back.

Comprised of bassist/vocalist Peder Bergstrand, lead guitarist/vocalist Ola Hellquist, guitarist Niclas Stålfors and drummer Andreas ErikssonLowrider‘s youth gave Ode to Io an imitable energy, and with Refractions, in “Red River” and “Ol’ Mule Pepe,” that original, vital spark is honored and expanded upon in a way that’s mature but by no means “old-sounding.” That is, as much as one might and probably should consider Refractions a “comeback” album, Lowrider do not come across in pieces like the organ-laced second cut “Ode to Ganymede,” the eight-minute side A finale “Sernanders Krog” and the 11-minute closer “Pipe Rider” like old men trying to recapture past glories.

Rather, the great triumph of Refractions, which also saw limited issue last year through Blues Funeral‘s Postwax vinyl subscription service (and for which I had the honor of doing liner notes), is to acknowledge the accomplishments Lowrider made two decades ago but not be restrained by them. This is where the fact of their only having been one prior full-length comes most into play. Lowrider had a couple other releases — a 1997 split with Sparzanza (discussed here), their 1998 split with Nebula (discussed here) — but their legacy and influence was localized almost entirely in Ode to Io, and that essentially set that record up as a monolith in time.

One record. And they were basically kids. Bergstrand was a teenager.

It doesn’t even seem fair. How could a modern incarnation of Lowrider possibly be expected to live up to such a standard? Refractions meets this question head-on. It does not shirk the responsibility Lowrider have in following their debut — and that may have something to do with why it’s coming out now when their reunion began at Desertfest some seven years ago — but it shows that Lowrider are different people than they were at 17 or in their early 20s, etc., and it brings new character and breadth to their craft that is more progressive than one could have reasonably hoped.

lowrider (Photo by Anna Liden Wiren)

In particular, Bergstrand‘s time fronting the pop-tinged melodic rock outfit I are Droid — whose underrated 2013 second LP, The Winter Ward (review here), still resonates — doesn’t seem to be forgotten, and even as “Pipe Rider” builds its forward wash of fuzz leading to the jam that will carry Refractions to its finish, its vocals deep in the mix bask in a melody more complex than anything Lowrider have done previously. That song is twice-over pivotal to Refractions, since its lyrics directly acknowledge the central task of the album in carrying forward what the band were into what they are: “Give me something new…Fragments from our youth,” and so on (that’s a point I raised in the liner notes as well, but it applies just the same).

And preceded by the instrumental pair “Sun Devil/M87,” the finale’s arrival is all the more an occasion on a side B, expanding on the lushness of “Ode to Ganymede” in tone and depth while finding its own course much as Lowrider themselves do all across the album, whether it’s the hooky nod and crash — I’ll just say outright that Eriksson‘s drums are a highlight unto themselves across the entire span of the record both in what he’s playing and the production value — of “Red River” or “Ol’ Mule Pepe” with Hellquist taking the lead vocal spot on the latter. At five minutes long, that brash rocker is paired well as the side B leadoff counterpart to “Red River” opening Refractions as a whole, but its vibe is even more of a standout for drawing the clearest line between the stoner rock of Lowrider‘s past and the heavy rock of their present, manifesting the Kyuss idolatry that fueled the band’s early work into a shuffling riff that’s righteous in its genre familiarity even as they take ownership of it.

Especially with the turn into “Sun Devil/M87” afterward, one gets the impression that even as Lowrider know the formidable task they’re facing, they’re still unafraid to have a good time here. It doesn’t all need to be a serious we-put-out-a-very-important-record-20-years-ago museum piece. It’s still rock and roll. “Sun Devil” is a wah-solo-topped blast, and “M87” picks up at the divide with a bassline from Bergstrand that sets a fuzzy course of pulled notes hypnotic in their repetition that end up a perfect lead-in for the closer, which again serves to mirror its side A counterpart in “Sernanders Krog” while at least in part telling the story of what Refractions is intended to be and what it means to the band. These are central moments for Lowrider, and they make it obvious on all six tracks that, while they know that Ode to Io means a lot to a lot of people, the best justice they can do to that album is to leave it in its place. So that’s what they do. Beautifully.

Refractions has been thus far received with a considerable amount of album-of-the-year-type hyperbole. Though it’s early in 2020 for such assignations and with the prior Postwax release, I admit I’m not sure if it counts as 2019 or not (or if it matters), but as a fan of Lowrider‘s past accomplishments, I can’t disagree with the excited sentiment around these songs. The album succeeds in every way in bringing Lowrider into the present and finds them indeed reflecting on the past, but refusing to lose themselves in it. As an entire generational shift has taken place in terms of audience over the last 10, let alone 20, years, Lowrider reestablish their place among heavy rock’s most momentous purveyors. If their new album is an occasion, it is one to which on every level they live up.

Recommended.

Lowrider on Thee Facebooks

Lowrider on Instagram

Lowrider on Bandcamp

Blues Funeral Recordings on Bandcamp

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Blues Funeral Recordings website

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Elden Premiere “Anubis” Video from Nostromo out Jan. 24

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 4th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

ELDEN

Swedish four-piece Elden will release their second album, Nostromo, as their label debut through Fuzzorama Records on Jan. 24. If you think you know what you’re getting just by the imprint involved, two things: One, kudos on your savvy and careful eye. Two, you’re wrong. While Fuzzorama, the aptly-named outlet helmed by Örebro fuzz kingpins Truckfighters, is known for doling out wonderfully hairy riffage and heavy rock groovies from the likes of Valley of the SunWe Hunt BuffaloTruckfighters themselves, AsteroidDeville and a host of others, Elden are on an entirely more pointed tack. On the nine-song/41-minute Nostromo, they show some flashes of Queens of the Stone Age influence in the post-intro leadoff cut “Sail and Savour,” the subsequent “Anubis” and maybe elsewhere here and there, but it’s filtered through a post-Mastodon modern progressive metal mindset, rife with winding riffs, a consuming largesse and persistent melody that holds regardless of how heavy the surroundings get. And by the time the title-track comes around on side B, following the particularly atmospheric “Heavy Rain” and leading into the lumber-unto-onslaught “Creatures Follows,” the surroundings get pretty gosh darn heavy.

That’s the surprise, I suppose, as Elden tap out Remission-style leads on “Creatures Follows” or find clarity in cacophony on the earlier “Fossilised” — just how “metal” Nostromo is. Elden NostromoCould it be a sign of an expanding aesthetic interest on the part of Fuzzorama? Your guess is as good as mine — probably better, if my history of guesses is anything to go by — but one way or the other, it makes Elden immediately distinct on the label’s roster, and much to their benefit, Nostromo has the personality and the songwriting to hold up to that distinction. The album is executed precisely but not without emotion behind it, and even as the penultimate interlude “The Passage” shifts into the nine-plus-minute riffer “Two-Faced Wizard” — a song that the band simply had to know would close the record when it was written — the sense of careening from one movement to another that makes the rest of Nostromo as exciting as it is doesn’t so much abate as find its destination and manifest. From its earlier hooks to this last blowout, the thoughtful nature of their songcraft and attention to detail in both the mix and performance come through in the listening experience, and whatever familiar elements are at play in the songs come tinged with enough feeling behind them to stave off redundancy. You’d have to catch them first, I suppose.

“Anubis,” premiering below, is the second video ahead of the January release of Nostromo behind the clip for “Sail and Savour,” which you can find at the bottom of this post, included just because one likes to keep up with these things. Preorders are up now through Fuzzorama should you be thusly inclined, and that link and more info follow here, courtesy, as ever, of the PR wire.

Please enjoy:

Elden, “Anubis” official video premiere

Second single from the upcoming album “Nostromo” due to be relased 24th of Jan 2020. Pre-order album – https://eu.fuzzoramastore.com/en/elden.html

Elden believes in the power of heavy metal riffs, melodic choruses and an all out head banging experience. Formed in 2012 in Karlstad, Sweden, the band started writing songs influenced by artists like Mastodon, Baroness, The Sword and classic bands from the 70s and 80s. They recorded and released their first demo one year later and performed on a regular basis at local venues. Come 2015, Elden released their first EP and started touring across the country. Having built a small following of both local and international fans the band started developing their sound, taking their songwriting in an interesting direction even heavier riffs, more distinct vocals and an overall more impressive production.

The future is very much exciting for fans of Elden. Having been picked up by critically acclaimed label Fuzzorama Records, Elden will release their new album “Nostromo” on the 24th of January 2020. Inspired by the cold darkness of time and space, these are by far the best songs the band have written.

Elden, “Sail & Savour” official video

Elden on Thee Facebooks

Elden on Instagram

Fuzzorama Records

Fuzzorama Records on Thee Facebooks

Fuzzorama on Bandcamp

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Quarterly Review: Tia Carrera, Inter Arma, Volcano, Wet Cactus, Duskwood, Lykantropi, Kavod, Onioroshi, Et Mors, Skånska Mord

Posted in Reviews on July 4th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

quarterly-review

Day four. I should’ve known we’d hit a snag at some point in the week, but it happened yesterday afternoon when Windows decided I desperately needed some update or other and then crapped the bed in the middle of said update. I wound up taking my laptop to a repair guy down the road in the afternoon, who said the hard drive needed to be wiped and have a full reinstall. Pretty brutal. He was going to back up what was there and get on it, said I could pick it up today. We’ll see how that goes, I guess. Also, happy Fourth, if America’s your thing. Let’s dive in.

Quarterly Review #31-40:

Tia Carrera, Visitors / Early Purple

tia carrera visitors early purple

They had a single out between (review here), but the two-song LP Visitors / Early Purple is Tia Carrera‘s first album since 2011’s Cosmic Priestess (review here). The Austin, Texas, three-piece — which now includes bassist Curt Christianson of Dixie Witch alongside guitarist Jason Morales and drummer Erik Conn — haven’t missed a beat in terms of creating heavy psychedelic sprawl, and as the side-consuming “Visitors” (18:32) and “Early Purple” (16:28) play out, it’s with a true jammed sensibility; that feeling that sooner or later the wheels are going to come off. They don’t, at least not really, but the danger always makes it more exciting, and Morales‘ tone has been much missed. In the intervening years, the social media generation has come up to revere Earthless for doing much of what Tia Carrera do, but there’s always room for more jams as far as I’m concerned, and it’s refreshing to have Tia Carrera back to let people know what they’ve been missing. Here’s hoping it’s not another eight years.

Tia Carrera on Thee Facebooks

Small Stone Records on Bandcamp

 

Inter Arma, Sulphur English

inter arma sulphur english

I can’t help but think Inter Arma‘s Sulphur English is the album Morbid Angel should have made after Covenant. And yes, that applies to the harmonies and organ of “Stillness” as well. The fourth full-length (third for Relapse) from the Richmond, Virginia, outfit is a beastly, severe and soulful 66-minute stretch of consuming, beyond-genre extremity. It punishes with purpose and scope, and its sense of brutality comes accompanied by a willful construction of atmosphere. Longer pieces like “The Atavist’s Meridian” and the closing title-track lend a feeling of drama, but at no point does Sulphur English feel like a put-on, and as Inter Arma continue their push beyond the even-then-inventive sludge of their beginnings, they’ve become something truly groundbreaking in metal, doing work that can only be called essential to push forward into new ground and seeming to swallow the universe whole in the meantime. It’s the kind of record that one can only hope becomes influential, both in its purpose toward individualism and its sheer physical impact.

Inter Arma on Thee Facebooks

Relapse Records website

 

Volcano, The Island

volcano the island

So you’ve got Harsh Toke‘s Gabe Messer on keys and vocals and JOY guitarist/Pharlee drummer Zach Oakley on guitar, and bassist Billy Ellsworth (also of Loom) and Matt Oakley on drums, plus it seems whoever else happened to be around the studio that day — and in San Diego, that could be any number of players — making up Volcano, whose debut, The Island (on Tee Pee) melds Afrobeat funk-rock with the band’s hometown penchant for boogie. The songs are catchy — “10,000 Screamin’ Souls,” “Naked Prey,” “Skewered,” “No Evil, Know Demon”; hooks abound — but there’s a feeling of kind of an unthinking portrayal of “the islander” as a savage that I can’t quite get past. There’s inherently an element of cultural appropriation to rock and roll anyway, but even more here, it seems. They make it a party, to be sure, but there’s a political side to what Afrobeat was originally about that goes unacknowledged here. They might get there, they might not. They’ve got the groove down on their first record, and that’s not nothing.

Volcano on Instagram

Tee Pee Records website

 

Wet Cactus, Dust, Hunger and Gloom

wet cactus dust hunger and gloom

Sometimes you just miss one, and I’ll admit that Wet CactusDust, Hunger and Gloom got by me. It likely would’ve been in the Quarterly Review a year ago had I not been robbed last Spring, but either way, the Spanish outfit’s second long-player is a fuzz rocker’s delight, a welcoming and raucous vibe persisting through “Full Moon Over My Head,” which is the second cut of the total five and the only one of the bunch under seven minutes long. They bring desert-jammy vibes to the songs surrounding, setting an open tone with “So Long” at the outset that the centerpiece “Aquelarre” fleshes out even further instrumentally ahead of the penultimate title-track’s classic build and payoff and the earth-toned nine-minute finale “Sleepy Trip,” which is nothing if not self-aware in its title as it moves toward the driving crescendo of the record. All throughout, the mood is as warm as the distortion, and Wet Cactus do right by staying true to the roots of desert rock. It’s not every record I’d want to review a year after the fact; think of it that way.

Wet Cactus on Thee Facebooks

Wet Cactus on Bandcamp

 

Duskwood, The Long Dark

duskwood the long dark

A follow-up EP to Duskwood‘s 2016 debut long-player, Desert Queen, the four-track The Long Dark is a solid showcase of their progression as songwriters and in the capital-‘d’ Desertscene style that has come to epitomize much of the UK heavy rock underground, taking loyalism to the likes of Kyuss and topping it off with the energy of modern London-based practitioners Steak. The four-piece roll out a right-on fuzzy groove in “Mars Rover” after opening with “Space Craft” and show more of a melodic penchant in “Crook and Flail” before tying it all together with “Nomad” at the finish. They warn on their Bandcamp page this is ‘Part 1,’ so it may not be all that long before they resurface. Fair enough as they’ve clearly found their footing in terms of style and songwriting here, and at that point the best thing to do is keep growing. As it stands, The Long Dark probably isn’t going to kick off any stylistic revolution, but there’s something to be said for the band’s ability to execute their material in conversation with what else is out there at the moment.

Duskwood on Thee Facebooks

Duskwood on Bandcamp

 

Lykantropi, Spirituosa

Lykantropi-Spirituosa

Sweet tones and harmonies and a classic, sun-coated progressivism persist on Lykantropi‘s second album, Spirituosa (on Lightning Records), basking in melodic flow across nine songs and 43 minutes that begin with the rockers “Wild Flowers” and “Vestigia” and soon move into the well-paired “Darkness” and “Sunrise” as the richer character of the LP unfolds. “Songbird” makes itself a highlight with its more laid back take, and the title-track follows with enough swing to fill whatever quota you’ve got, while “Queen of Night” goes full ’70s boogie and “Seven Blue” imagines Tull and Fleetwood Mac vibes — Flutewood Mac! — and closer and longest track “Sällsamma Natt” underscores the efficiency of songwriting that’s been at play all the while amidst all that immersive gorgeousness and lush melodicism. They include a bit of push in the capper, and well they should, but go out with a swagger that playfully counteracts the folkish humility of the proceedings. Will fly under many radars. Shouldn’t.

Lykantropi on Thee Facebooks

Lightning Records website

 

Kavod, Wheel of Time

kavod wheel of time

As Italian trio Kavod shift from opener “Samsara” into “Absolution” on their debut EP, Wheel of Time, the vocals become a kind of chant for the verse that would seem to speak to the meditative intention of the release on the whole. They will again on the more patient closer “Mahatma” too, and fair enough as the band seem to be trying to find a place for themselves in the post-Om or Zaum sphere of spiritual exploration through volume, blending that aesthetic with a more straight-ahead songwriting methodology as manifest in “Samsara” particularly. They have the tones right on as they begin this inward and outward journey, and it will be interesting to hear in subsequent work if they grow to work in longer, possibly-slower forms or push their mantras forward at the rate they do here, but as it stands, they take a reverent, astral viewpoint with their sound and feel dug in on that plane of existence. It suits them.

Kavod on Thee Facebooks

Kavod on Bandcamp

 

Onioroshi, Beyond These Mountains

onioroshi beyond these mountains

Onioroshi flow smoothly from atmospheric post-sludge to more thrusting heavy rock and they take their time doing it, too. With their debut album, Beyond These Mountains, the Italian heavy proggers present four tracks the shortest of which, “Locusta,” runs 10:54. Bookending are “Devilgrater” (14:17) and “Eternal Snake (Mantra)” (20:30) and the penultimate “Socrate” checks in at 12:29, so yes, the trio have plenty of chances to flesh out their ideas as and explore as they will. Their style leans toward post-rock by the end of “Devilgrater,” but never quite loses its sense of impact amid the ambience, and it’s not until “Socrate” that they go full-on drone, setting a cinematic feel that acts as a lead-in for the initial build of the closer which leads to an apex wash and a more patient finish than one might expect given the trip to get there. Beyond These Mountains is particularly enticing because it’s outwardly familiar but nuanced enough to still strike an individual note. It’s easy to picture Onioroshi winding up on Argonauta or some other suitably adventurous imprint.

Onioroshi on Thee Facebooks

Onioroshi on Bandcamp

 

Et Mors, Lux in Morte

et mors lux in morte

Whoever in Maryland/D.C. then-four-piece Et Mors decided to record their Lux in Morte EP in their practice space had the right idea. The morose death-doom three-songer takes cues from USBM in the haunting rawness of “Incendium Ater,” and even though the 19-minute “House of Nexus” comes through somewhat clearer — it was recorded to tape at Shenandoah University — it remains infected by the filth and grit of the opener. Actually, “infected” might be the word all around here, as the mold-sludge of closer “Acid Bender” creeps along at an exposed-flesh, feedback-drenched lurch, scathing as much in intent as execution, playing like a death metal record at half-speed and that much harsher because they so clearly know what they’re doing. If you think it matters that they mixed stuff from two different sessions, you’re way off base on the sound overall here. It’s patch-worthy decay metal, through and through. Concerns of audio fidelity need not apply.

Et Mors on Thee Facebooks

Et Mors on Bandcamp

 

Skånska Mord, Blues from the Tombs

skanska mord blues from the tombs

When Sweden’s Skånska Mord are singing about the deep freeze in album opener “Snow” on the Transubstans-released Blues from the Tombs, I believe it. It’s been seven years since Small Stone issued their Paths to Charon LP (review here), and the new record finds them more fully dug into a classic rocker’s take on hard-blues, rolling with Iommic riffs and a mature take on what earliest Spiritual Beggars were able to capture in terms of a modern-retro sound. “Snow” and “Simon Says” set an expectation for hooks that the more meandering “Edge of Doom” pulls away from, while “The Never Ending Greed” brings out the blues harp over an abbreviated two minutes and leads into a more expansive side B with “Blinded by the Light” giving way to the wah-bassed “Sun,” the barroom blueser “Death Valley Blues” and the returning nod of closer “The Coming of the Second Wave,” stood out by its interwoven layers of soloing and hypnosis before its final cut. It’s been a while, but they’ve still got it.

Skånska Mord on Thee Facebooks

Transubstans Records website

 

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Space Probe Taurus to Release Mondo Satan in April

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 6th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

space probe taurus

Originally announced almost a full year ago for a Summer 2014 release on Ripple, the second album from Swedish heavy rockers Space Probe TaurusMondo Satan, has now been given an April 28 arrival date from the label. The four-piece, who trace their roots back to the early ’90s, released their first, self-titled long-player through Buzzville Records in 2008, and so yeah, it’s been a minute. One can’t help but wonder when Mondo Satan was actually recorded, but I guess that’s what liner notes are for finding out.

To whet groove appetites — groovepetites? nah… — the PR wire has seen fit to unveil “The Iguana” as the first audio to come from the album, and it comes accompanied by announcement of the release date. Apparently the first run of CDs has already sold out on preorder (and here I thought I was the last person on the planet who gave a crap about the format), but one imagines more are in the works. If you dig, then dig:

space probe taurus mondo satan

Space Probe Taurus to release new album Mondo Satan this April via Ripple Music | Listen and stream ‘The Iguana’ now

This April, acclaimed hard-hitting acid rockers Space Probe Taurus congregate with fellow psych worshippers Ripple Music to release their latest foray into the world of biker-flicks, lysergic rock ‘n’ roll and feral fuzz.

Ladies and gentlemen, may we present for your listening pleasure ‘The Iguana’, taken from their soon to be unleashed new album Mondo Satan.

Originally formed as Snake Machine in 1992 it wasn’t until a name change and shortening of their songs in ’97 that the band settled into doing what they do best; preaching the gospel of dirty garage rock. Swedish style.

Often compared to the likes of Mudhoney, The Stooges, MC5 and Blue Cheer – the latter of whom SPT paid tribute to with a ripping cut of ‘Second Time Around’ on Black Widow Records’ Blue Explosion – their music is influenced by late ’60s psych rock and low-budget B-movies like Psychomania and Angels From Hell. A dual obsession that quickly led on to the band contributing music to the 2005 “snuff documentary” Actress Apocalypse and revenge thriller I Am Vengeance in 2012.

Mondo Satan is the band’s follow up to their self-titled debut album from 2008 and will be released worldwide via Ripple Music on 28th April 2015.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Space-Probe-Taurus/267503979145
ripple-music.com
facebook.com/pages/Ripple-Music/369610860064
ripplemusic.bandcamp.com
youtube.com/user/GroovesandRipples/
twitter.com/RippleMusic

Space Probe Taurus, “The Iguana”

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Space Probe Taurus to Release Mondo Satan this Summer on Ripple Music

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 17th, 2014 by JJ Koczan

I managed to find Space Probe Taurusself-titled Buzzville Records debut at the since-defunct Bullit Records in beautiful Eindhoven, the Netherlands in 2012, and it wasn’t a purchase I regretted making. Today the news has come down the PR wire that the Swedish heavy rockers have inked a deal to release their forthcoming sophomore outing — some six years in the making — on Ripple Music this coming summer. Exact date is TBA, but though Space Probe Taurus have done numerous soundtrack and compilation appearances over their many years, it seems reasonable to expect they’d be in a hurry to get Mondo Satan out after so long.

Dig it:

Cult Acid Fuzz Rockers SPACE PROBE TAURUS Sign Worldwide Deal With Ripple Music!

New album “Mondo Satan” to be released in summer 2014!

RIPPLE MUSIC is proud to announce the signing of acclaimed, hard-hitting acid biker heavy rockers, SPACE PROBE TAURUS to their ever-expanding roster!

Space Probe Taurus has been around in one form or another since 1992, but it wasn’t until a name change and shortening of the songs in 1997 that the band settled down into doing what they still do today: preaching the gospel of dirty garage rock Swedish style. Their music has been called Biker Movie Acid Fuzz and that sums it up as well as anything we could say!

Since the release of the Blue Cheer tribute CD “Blue Explosion”, by Black Widow Records, the band has been part of many compilations. And the year after saw the release of their first own record, the “Insect City” EP on Game Two/Slowdive Records. The band has also been involved deeply in the American low budget movie scene, first providing a song for the “I Am Vengeance” soundtrack (released by Meteor City Records in 2001), then having 12 songs in the movie “Actress Apocalypse”. Upcoming in 2014 is the movie “Franklin” which will include yet another song (a demo version of the song “Mondo Satan”).

In 2008 it was time for the first album, a self-titled debut released by the Belgian label Buzzville Records, which got outstanding reviews from all over the world. Since the release of the album the band has kept writing new material, played live and kept recording new demos. In 2012 the general feeling was that a new album needed to be done, and after a long process of deciding on the songs the band started to record, what would become the album “Mondo Satan”, scheduled to be released on Ripple Music in summer 2014!

On “Mondo Satan” Space Probe Taurus are:
Sjöberg – vocals, guitars
Tömte – guitars, backing vocals
Enberg – bass, backing vocals
Boman – drums

“Mondo Satan” tracklist:
1. Scorpio Queen
2. Kill City Death Cult
3. Spahn Ranch Motherfucker
4. Make Me Bleed
5. Galaxy Travelin’ Blues
6. Superfuzzed
7. Mondo Satan
8. Dust Joint
9. The Iguana
10. The Righteous One

For the growing ranks of Ripple fans, known as the Waveriders, Space Probe Taurus will be another must-hear addition to the ranks of bands that already include such heavy rockers as Volume IV, Devil to Pay, Mothership, or Ape Machine.

For More Info Visit:
http://on.fb.me/1lGw9X4
http://www.youtube.com/user/SpaceProbeTaurus
http://www.reverbnation.com/spaceprobetaurus
http://www.ripple-music.com

Space Probe Taurus, “Mondo Satan” demo

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