The Obelisk Presents: The Top 15 of 2015 So Far

Posted in Features on July 6th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

top 15 of 2015 so far the-rhinoceros-albrecht-durer

If 2015 ended tomorrow, I think you’d still have to say it was a pretty good year for heavy rock. Doom veered into a swath extremes — its own subgenres emerging almost one by one in a growing splinter that nonetheless continues to draw water from its roots — while the neo-stoner ignition of the West Coast continued its boom of new acts proffering classic groove. The East reveled in a progressive vision just waiting to be picked up by others, and in Europe, the ’70s traditionalist movement spread ever wider, essentially defining a modern sound in organic sounding, sometimes-vintage elements. Whether you’re going for crushing, oppressive barbarism or cosmos-bound blissouts, it is, in short, a good time to be alive.

Of course, 2015 doesn’t end tomorrow, and there’s still a whole lot of year to come. About half, as it happens. So, as has been the tradition around here for the last half-decade — and seems to be the tradition in a growing number of outlets; not taking credit or claiming to have invented anything, just noting a proliferation — it’s time to count down the best records of the year so far. There have been more than a handful of gems, and since in December I’m planning on doing a top 30, we’ll mark half the year with a top 15. Seems only fair.

Please note that this isn’t purely a critical evaluation, but a personal list, and that what I’ve put on most is as crucial a factor in my ranking as how important I think a given record is. You know the drill by now. Let’s go:

15. Stoned Jesus, The Harvest

stoned jesus the harvest

Self-released. Reviewed Feb. 20.

Kiev three-piece "I needed someone to Business Plan For Mentoring Program for me. So I contacted this service and that was the best decision possible! Got A))", says Bill. Be smart, be like Bill. Stoned Jesus have a varied stylistic history, and their third outing, DissertationTeam.com offers cheap PhD purchase a research paper online. Top US writers for your thesis. Custom writing service that makes the difference! The Harvest was ultimately a success in large part because of its complete refusal to be defined. Atop a foundation of quality songcraft, the trio proffered a sound that was not necessarily experimental in terms of anti-structure noise or effects onslaughts, but bold in each of its forays outward from its heavy rock underpinnings.

 

14. Freedom Hawk, Into Your Mind

freedom hawk into your mind

Released by Looking to buy a How To Make Assignment of high quality assignments. We at assignment writing service write best academic papers ORDER NOW! Small Stone. Reviewed June 26.

It has consistently taken me a while to get a hold on what more info here Services at affordable price Avail Here. Expert PhD level Dissertation Writers helps you for your Dissertation writing. Freedom Hawk are up to. The steady elements in their sound are held to so firmly that on the first couple listens, it seems to just be more of the same. But the more one digs in, the more there is to be found, and with Effective Personal Statement. Students always encounter difficulties when solving algebra homework due to the lack of understanding during teaching. In some cases Into Your Mind, the Virginia Beach trio overcome losing a member to create their most progressive outing to date, flourishes of psychedelia melding easily with their signature style of sunshiny riffing.

 

13. My Sleeping Karma, Moksha

my sleeping karma moksha

Released by All worried students looking for https://cheapdissertationwriting.com/create-order/ are at right place; Thank God, I found dissertationstore.co.uk, Napalm Records. Reviewed May 12.

Five albums deep, Germany’s http://www.hotrodgarage.hu/?homework-help-online-go-myhrwcom Online Programming Homework Help DO MY COMPUTER SCIENCE HOMEWORK INTRODUCTION When that language is one that drives a My Sleeping Karma are an act unto themselves. Their progress has been natural, fueled by a clear, varied sense of exploratory will, and the results on this year’s From urgent deadlines to complex assignments, here is a detailed guide on how and why you should use Homework Negative Effects writing service for assignment help Moksha were nothing short of stunning. Branching out their arrangements might not be new to them, but the inclusion of horns, drones, percussion, etc., amid the central guitar, bass, keys and drums lent an almost orchestral feel to the flow between the tracks, and one can only hope they continue on their current path, because it is unquestionably the right one.

 

12. Death Alley, Black Magick Boogieland

death alley black magick boogieland

Released by If you are thinking follow for me cheap at that particular time, then donít panic and contact our essay writing service. Tee Pee Records. Reviewed June 8.

So much potential, so much vitality at the heart of this debut from Essays On Public Service Motivation by UK freelance book editor and proofreader. Affordable and professional editing and proofreading for your book, novel, ebook or story. Death Alley. The Amsterdam-based four-piece (interview here) stormed out of the gate with a ripper of a debut, and just when you seemed to have it all figured out, they hit the ignition on a 12-minute full-impulse space rock thrust, a guest vocal appearance from click site - witness the benefits of professional writing help available here Benefit from our affordable custom research paper writing Farida Lemouchi (a former bandmate of write essay my favorite places from experts with knowledge in all writing aspects. You should entrust your writing assignments to the best specialists. Death Alley guitarist my country sri lanka essay english - Why be concerned about the assignment? get the needed guidance on the website Find out key steps how to get a plagiarism free Oeds Beydals in Professional find this Fast On-Time Delivery ? Additional Discounts ?? Business, Sales, Formal, Personal, Admission Letters Writing The Devil’s Blood) adding both mystique and emotional resonance to what was already a stunning track. With all the riotousness preceding,¬† Free Hotel Business Plan.com - Review of One of the Most Popular and Highly-Rated Academic Writing Services Black Magick Boogieland¬†readily¬†lived up to its righteous title.

 

11. Mondo Drag, Mondo Drag

mondo drag self titled

Released on RidingEasy Records and Kozmik Artifactz. Reviewed Jan. 8.

Midwestern-turned-West-Coast heavy psych rockers Mondo Drag may have taken their time in releasing their self-titled sophomore outing, which followed their 2010 debut, New Rituals (review here), and was recorded in 2012, but it’s easy to imagine that’s because they wanted the circumstances to be as special as the album itself, recorded with a fleeting five-piece lineup that included the one-time rhythm section of Radio Moscow who wound up leaving to further their then-nascent project, Blues Pills. Even without that lineup shift as a factor, the late ’60s vibe Mondo Drag brought out across the release proved eminently listenable and has held up on repeat visits.

 

10. Cigale, Cigale

cigale self-titled

Self-released. Reviewed May 4.

A gorgeous, shimmering and melodically resonant debut from the Dutch four-piece Cigale, their self-titled gracefully maintained tonal presence and warmth while also enacting a psychedelic sprawl and grooving serenity that acted like the landscape in which the songs took place. It was a rich, bright vibe, and an utter joy to behold, tracks like “Harvest Begun,” “Feel the Heat” and “Eyes Wide Shut” proving as memorable as they were inviting. Having two former members of the much-missed fuzz rock outfit¬†Sungrazer may have initially turned some heads in their direction, but¬†Cigale‘s first album proved they’re an outfit with their own personality, their own development to undertake, and already much to offer.

 

9. The Machine, Offblast!

the machine offblast

Released by Elektrohasch Schallplatten. Reviewed May 28.

The awaited return of The Machine brought the band’s fifth album and a further-refined sense of maturity in their processes, as well as intrigue as to where they might be headed, two dual modes of open-ended jamming and more structured songwriting playing off each other in the extended ‚ÄúChrysalis (J.A.M.)” and “Come to Light” and the more verse/chorus stylizations of “Dry End” and “Off Course.” To be perfectly honest, I doubt The Machine will ultimately pick one side over another, since if Offblast! proved anything it’s that they can easily handle either or both, but as they continue to grow, it’s encouraging to have their style establish itself as so multi-faceted.

 

8. The Atomic Bitchwax, Gravitron

the atomic bitchwax gravitron

Released by Tee Pee Records. Reviewed April 20.

First time I pressed play on Gravitron was a real “oh shit!” moment. The last release from NJ stalwarts The Atomic Bitchwax was 2011’s The Local Fuzz (review here), a single-song full-length instrumental riff onslaught that had its charm but was inherently divorced from the appeal of the band’s songwriting. Not only does Gravitron re-factor that in with songs like “Roseland,” “It’s Alright,” “Coming in Hot” and “Ice Age Hey Baby,” among others, but it hits with kick-in-the-ass production force and an all-out heaviness that 2008’s¬†TAB4¬†showed the three-piece steering directly away from. Just a killer record. Utterly void of pretense. No bullshit. No need to rely on anything more than chemistry, and with the¬†Bitchwax, that’s plenty.

 

7. Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, Brothers of the Sonic Cloth

brothers of the sonic cloth self titled

Released by Neurot Recordings. Reviewed March 3.

Right now, Brothers of the Sonic Cloth are my band to beat for Debut of the Year, and I’m quite frankly not sure how anyone is going to be able to do it, so if list time comes in Dec. and you see Tad Doyle‘s trio marked out as such, know that it’s been that way in my head for some time. The three-piece of Doyle, bassist Peggy “Pegadeth” Tully and drummer Dave French arrived with a roar, and even when their self-titled let up sonically, the atmosphere remained viscerally heavy. Six years having passed since the release of¬†their first demo (review here), I wasn’t sure there was ever going to be an album, but then to have¬†Brothers of the Sonic Cloth¬†show up and enact such thorough demolition only made it more impressive.

 

6. High on Fire, Luminiferous

high on fire luminiferous

Released by eOne Heavy. Reviewed June 15.

It can’t possibly be a surprise to have Luminiferous show up somewhere on this list. The seventh long-player by High on Fire had all the rage and bombast in “Slave the Hive” and “The Black Plot” that have become the band’s hallmarks over their 17 years together, but branched out progressively as well in songs like “The Cave” and “The Falconist,” the latter of which was brazenly catchy and about as emotionally direct as the band has ever gotten, their general modus being — and in that song too, just to a lesser extent — a metaphor-laced lyrical approach. That song was a triumph and so was the album as a whole; the second collaboration with producer Kurt Ballou building on the rampaging victories¬†of 2012’s¬†De Vermis Mysteriis (review here) while also showing growth on the part of one of modern metal’s most pivotal bands.

 

5. Kings Destroy, Kings Destroy

kings destroy self titled

Released by War Crime Recordings. Reviewed April 15.

Hitting¬†more or less concurrent with¬†a vinyl release of their prior album, 2013’s A Time of Hunting (review here), Kings Destroy‘s Kings Destroy is not at all coincidentally titled. Over the course of now three full-lengths, the New York five-piece — about whom I feign no impartiality, let it be noted — have distinguished themselves with a sound neither noise, nor doom, nor heavy rock, but drawing on elements of all three when it suits their purposes with chemistry built from years of being in bands together of various stripes and in various genres. What stands the self-titled out from their past work, in part, is that it is the closest they’ve yet come to capturing their live sound in the studio, and accordingly,¬†it’s a volatile kind of heavy that bends aesthetic to its will rather than capitulating to expectations of any sort. I don’t think they’re done growing by any stretch, but¬†Kings Destroy¬†feels like an arrival front-to-back.

 

4. Colour Haze, To the Highest Gods We Know

colour haze to the highest gods we know

Released by Elektrohasch Schallplatten. Reviewed Jan. 6.

This one was almost a sneak-attack. German heavy psych forerunners Colour Haze released To the Highest Gods We Know, their 11th full-length, in Dec. 2014 on CD (the vinyl was in 2015, which is what we’re counting in this instance), with very, very little fanfare of any sort. There was a track premiere here that came shortly after the album was announced, but I think it was officially out less than a month after its existence was made public, which for a band of Colour Haze‘s stature and influence was surprising. Less devoted to¬†grandeur than¬†2012’s 2CD She Said (review here), it nonetheless pushed the band’s sound forward and found them experimenting in their studio, particularly on the string-quartet-inclusive finale title-track, which offset jams like “√úberall” and the laid back highlight “Call” with a rhythmic oddness that was somehow still¬†Colour Haze‘s own. I couldn’t help but wonder where it was leading, but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t masterful in its own right.

 

3. Goatsnake, Black Age Blues

goatsnake black age blues

Released by Southern Lord Recordings. Reviewed May 19.

Goatsnake didn’t have it easy going into their third album. It had been 15 years since their sophomore outing, Flower of Disease, 11 since their last EP, and five since they first started playing shows again. Expectations? Through the roof. Among heavy rock heads, a new¬†Goatsnake¬†was like seeing the mountaintop. I mean, a big fucking deal and then some. Then the record hits, and there’s just about no way it can live up to the anticipation, but god damn if¬†Goatsnake¬†not only¬†finally¬†put out a third album, but one that was better than I think anyone could’ve hoped for. Hearing¬†Pete Stahl¬†with however many backup singers he had on “Another River to Cross” et. al. was like finding an animal in its native habitat, and between his soul,¬†Greg Anderson‘s riffs, bassist¬†Scott Renner‘s low end rumble and drummer¬†Greg Rogers‘ roll,¬†Black Age Blues¬†won almost immediately and then spent the rest of its 47 minutes throwing itself a victory party. “Elevated Man,” “House of the Moon,” “Jimi’s Gone,” “Grandpa Jones,” almost on a per-track basis,¬†Goatsnake¬†added to the reasons they’ve been so heralded despite a decade-plus’ absence from the studio.

 

2. Elder, Lore

elder lore

Released by Armageddon Shop and Stickman Records. Reviewed Feb. 19.

On the level of achievement alone, Elder‘s Lore will be the album of the year for many, and there are times (such as right now) when I listen to it and question whether or not it isn’t also my pick for that honor, but wherever it falls on whatever list, far more important is what the Massachusetts/Rhode Island/New York trio manage to accomplish across their third LP’s formidable five-track/59-minute span, songs like “Compendium” and “Deadweight” bridging a rarely approached gap between heavy and progressive rocks while maintaining a flow consistent with the psychedelic vibing of 2011’s Dead Roots Stirring (review here) but grown outward in another aesthetic direction and no sooner setting foot on the ground than seeming to master it in a flurry of blinding turns, sprawling soundscapes and clarity of mind that found perhaps its greatest expression in the centerpiece title-track, the 15-minute “Lore” itself, which I’ve no doubt will stand among if not atop the best songs of 2015 when the year is over and encapsulates the ambition and the corresponding breadth of¬†Elder‘s songwriting, the trio of guitarist/vocalist¬†Nick DiSalvo,¬†bassist¬†Jack Donovan, and drummer¬†Matt Couto rising as one of the East Coast’s most pivotal acts, with a sound completely their own.

 

1. Acid King, Middle of Nowhere, Center of Everywhere

acid king middle of nowhere center of everywhere

Released by Svart Records. Reviewed March 19.

I use the word “molten” pretty regularly to describe an album or song that seems to just ooze its way out of the speakers or shift seamlessly between its songs, but Acid King set an entirely new standard for the term with Middle of Nowhere, Center of Everywhere. Their first outing for Svart and their first release in a decade, its 55 minutes were a riff-rolling nirvana of lurching fuzz and tonal excellence, the guitar of¬†Lori S. at the fore accompanied by¬†Mark Lamb‘s bass and¬†Joey Osbourne‘s drums, the swing of which propelled a highlight track like “Coming down from Outer Space” right back into it, while elsewhere on the record, “Silent Pictures,” “Red River” and “Infinite Skies” torched stoner conventions into a new space-biker rock, culminating in the heavy psych of “Center of Everywhere,” which seemed to emanate from the place it was describing, at once empty and full. More than just a welcome return after a long dearth of releases,¬†Middle of Nowhere, Center of Everywhere¬†found¬†Acid King¬†progressed even beyond where they were with 2005’s¬†III, though more than anything else, what makes it my top pick for the year so far is the fact that I can’t seem to walk away from it for too long before going back, and ultimately, that’s what it all comes down to with his kind of thing. I’ve yet to find a standard to which these songs don’t live up.

Honorable Mention:

A few others worth noting. The¬†Sun Blood Stories¬†album (streamed here) continues to resonate. Also¬†Monolord,¬†Valkyrie, Lamp of the Universe,¬†Garden of Worm,¬†Wo Fat‘s live record, The Midnight Ghost Train‘s Cold was the Ground and¬†Ufomammut‘s¬†Ecate. The¬†Black Rainbows¬†was a joy, as was¬†Spidergawd‘s second LP, and while I still feel like I haven’t given it its due, the¬†Sumac¬†won many over and should get a mention.¬†Steve Von Till‘s solo outing and the latest from¬†Enslaved are worth seeking out as well for anyone who hasn’t heard them yet.

More to Come:

The year’s only half over, which is kind of a scary thought but true nonetheless. Watch out in the coming months for new stuff from¬†Bloodcow,¬†All Them Witches,¬†Clutch,¬†Graveyard,¬†Zun,¬†Sacri Monti (if that one’s not already out),¬†Snail,¬†Uncle Acid, and¬†Kind. The new¬†Kadavar¬†is a sure-fire top tenner, and between that, the potential for a new¬†Neurosis¬†album and stuff like¬†Magnetic Eye Records‘¬†Electric Ladyland [Redux], there’s no way the book is written on the best of 2015.

So stay tuned.

And if I’ve still got your attention, thanks for reading.
 

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Freedom Hawk, Into Your Mind: Underneath a Blood Red Sky

Posted in Reviews on June 26th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

freedom hawk into your mind

No question that Into Your Mind is, in its songwriting and construction and in the stylistic breadth it covers, a step forward for Virginia Beach heavy rockers Freedom Hawk. Named perhaps for being where the songs go, it’s their fourth outing overall and second for Small Stone behind 2011’s Moving On (review here), its 10-track/52-minute run reinforces the classic metal and heavy rock influences under which they’ve been working all along (Ozzy, Fu Manchu, etc.) while also pushing ahead into new ground, subtly psychedelic but still woven around earthy and traditional structures. Perhaps the biggest change of all is that the band are now a trio, having parted ways with guitarist¬†Matt Cave since their last time out and continued to operate as the three-piece of guitarist/vocalist T.R. Morton, bassist Mark Cave and drummer Lenny Hines.

Where the band might have been in the writing for Into Your Mind when that split occurred, I don’t know, but Matt is given a writing credit on opener “Blood Red Sky,” “Journey Home,” “Waterfall” and side B’s “Beyond Our Reach” — the tracklisting broken into sides even on back of the CD and very much operating in that kind of structure despite the format — though he doesn’t seem to have participated in the actual recording, the trio tracking the instrumental portion of the LP live with producer/engineer/mixer Jim Woodling with Morton handling the vocals afterward. Their chemistry comes through what’s still a crisp production across the board, though, and while there still sounds like a layer of rhythm guitar under the solo in “Blood Red Sky,” their operation with their new lineup configuration is fluid and the momentum they build over the course of the first two tracks, that opener and “Journey Home,” carries through to some of the more stylistically expansive material that follows.

One thing to get straight, we’re not talking about leaps and bounds here, but natural, incremental stylistic progression. Reasonable. It begins on side A, though the let’s-get-to-it-ness of “Blood Red Sky” and “Journey Home”‘s hooks signals business as usual from¬†Freedom Hawk, “Lost in Space,” with its more patient intro from all three and keys from¬†Morton, brings a turn that presages some of side B’s more adventurous moments. At its heart, it’s still catchy and largely straightforward, but the shift in atmosphere is palpable from the first two cuts and it begins a broadening process that continues later. The lead on “On Your Knees” is a standout, though more so the turn in approach of the vocals, which will later get a fuller exploration on the title-track, and¬†Hines‘ drumming proves able to push the material along at whatever pace is set or direction it might be headed.

freedom hawk

He holds a tension in “Lost in Space” and the later “The Line” and is forward-minded, but definitely not without a sense of swing to coincide. “Journey Home” showcases that and he begins side A closer “Waterfall” with snare work that sets up the song’s more laid-back vibe, the verse arriving later, a few lines tossed out as a precursor to a relatively stripped down chorus compared to that of “Lost in Space” or “Blood Red Sky,” the trio ready and willing to let their chemistry do the talking when it suits them. Side B’s launch, “Radar,” is more of a riff-rocker, but it picks up in its midsection to find more of a rush in which the band seems utterly at home for the bridge before they turn back to the chorus, chugging central nod and surprisingly airy finish. With the shifts that the second half of¬†Into Your Mind¬†brings about, the beginning of that half is still pretty much in line with the cuts preceding. It’s not really until “Beyond Our Reach” kicks in that they fully show their hand.

A jazzy start like something¬†Fatso Jetson¬†might conjure begins “Beyond Our Reach,” and that rhythm holds after the riff and a NWOBHM-style lead progression¬†commence to give an alternate vision of¬†Freedom Hawk‘s brand of heavy rock. Layered vocals seem to mirror guitar harmonies and while the effect is still heavy and a shuffle is present, once again the context has changed. The previously-alluded-to vocal turn on “Into Your Mind” pushes further against expectation —¬†Morton‘s compression-on higher-register vocals are as much a signature as the band has — and they’re not completely gone, but even changing into and out of the chorus establishes a dynamic in an unanticipated way, and “Into Your Mind” also proves to be¬†Cave‘s best performance on bass, his presence in the pocket just behind the guitar only helps in setting that righteous tone.

At 6:51, the penultimate “The Line” is the longest inclusion by nearly a full minute, and they use that extra time for an instrumental drive, but I wouldn’t necessarily call it a “jam,” since though it finds¬†Hines¬†on his ride, there always seems to be a plotted course being followed. Keys or layered-in background leads pepper the pre-chorus and return later during the extended instrumental part, which is also how they finish before bringing things back to earth for “All Because of You,” a more hook-based start-stopper that seems to be geared toward bookending with “Blood Red Sky,” but honestly, by the time they get there, the opener’s straight-ahead thrust feels like a long time ago and a long ways away. That feeling itself is evidence of the growth¬†Freedom Hawk¬†have undertaken despite losing a player, and though¬†Into Your Mind¬†finds them branching out, it also serves to reinforce the aspects of their sonic personality that have been their hallmarks up to this point in their career. They’re still¬†Freedom Hawk, they’re just working to expand the definition of what that means.

Freedom Hawk, Into Your Mind (2015)

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Freedom Hawk on Bandcamp

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Freedom Hawk to Release Into Your Mind on June 23

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 8th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

freedom hawk

Next month, Virginia Beach trio Freedom Hawk head overseas to tour in Germany and the Netherlands around an appearance at this year’s¬†Freak Valley¬†festival. Shortly after their return to the States, they’ll present their new album,¬†Into Your Mind. Their fourth full-length and second for¬†Small Stone Records,¬†Into Your Mind¬†tightens up the tones and songcraft that made the band’s 2011 outing,¬†Holding On¬†(review here), a riffy standout, and marks their first offering as a trio.

Into Your Mind is available to preorder now. Links, info and tour dates follow, hoisted off the PR wire:

freedom hawk into your mind

US heavy trio FREEDOM HAWK to unleash new album “Into Your Mind” this June on Small Stone Records; European tour dates announced.

If you need seriously heavy and high-spirited rock music in your life, then Virginia Beach’s groove-mongers FREEDOM HAWK are about to give you some, with their fourth album coming out this June on Small Stone Records. Leather, jean and maximum volume mandatory!

Emanating from the barrier dunes of Virginia, FREEDOM HAWK‚Äôs heavy riffs, rolling groove, and soulful guitar melodies definitely produce a sound of their own. The trio‚Äôs brand of heavy rock capitalizes on the best of the heavy ‚Äė70s, while presenting a modern fuzzy take based around quality songwriting rather than style-over-substance retro posturing.

FREEDOM HAWK made their debut on Small Stone Records with 2011‚Äôs Holding On. The follow-up, and their fourth album overall, is Into Your Mind, which brings a new dynamic to their buttery fuzz with all the stomp and swagger one could ask for after the previous effort. Get a taster with first excerpt “Blood Red Sky” HERE.

New album “Into Your Mind”, out June 23 on Small Stone Records
CD & Limited Edition 180gr Vinyl preorder AT THIS LOCATION

Veterans already of Roadburn in the Netherlands, FREEDOM HAWK will return to Europe this June, including a special appearance at Germany’s Freak Valley Festival:

FREEDOM HAWK EUROPEAN TOUR
04.06 – ANTWERP (BE) Antwerp Music City
05.06 – NETPHEN (DE) Freak Valley Festival
06.06 – D√úSSELDORF (DE) Pitcher – Rock’n’Roll Headquarter
07.06 – N√úRNBERG (DE) Klub Nychka
08.06 – HAMBURG (DE) Bar 227
09.06 – JENA (DE) Kulturbahnhof
10.06 РBERLIN (DE) Jägerklause
11.06 – NIJMEGEN (NL) De Onderbroek
12.06 – M√úNSTER (DE) Rare Guitar
13.06 – LEIPZIG (DE) Black Label
14.06 – ROESELARE (BE) De Verlichte Geest

FREEDOM HAWK IS
Lenny Hines ‚Äď Drums
T.R. Morton ‚Äď Vocals, Guitar
Mark Cave ‚Äď Bass

www.facebook.com/freedomhawkmusic
www.smallstone.com

Freedom Hawk, “Blood Red Sky”

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