Långfinger Premiere Video for “Say Jupiter”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 13th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

langfinger

We’re more than a year out now from the release of Långfinger‘s third album and Small Stone Records debut, Crossyears (review here), and the Swedish trio continue to provide the offering worthy support. Last month, they wrapped yet another round of touring that took them through Germany, Belgium and the Czech Republic, and they’ve got a brand new video premiering today for “Say Jupiter,” the second cut from the record.

I don’t know who in Långfinger‘s world owns a restaurant and decided to give the three-piece access to the kitchen for the purposes of the Anders Bryngel-directed clip, but the results are pretty hilarious. As anyone who’s ever made one can tell you, a good meal is as much about preparation as it is about the taste of the outcome, and whether they’re in the kitchen rocking out or in the front of the house getting the royal treatment from the waitstaff — also played by them — bassist/vocalist Victor Crusner, guitarist/backing vocalist Kalle Lilja and drummer/backing vocalist Jesper Pihl seem to be having a great time putting it altogether. Whatever dinner turns out to be, it’s apparently a pretty transcendent experience. Must’ve had a lot of garlic.

God damn, I love garlic.

What were we talking about? Oh right, Långfinger. Well, the way I see it, the only question is whether or not the “Say Jupiter” video — which is the band’s second time working with Bryngel after their clip for “Fox Confessor” (premiered here) — is the band’s way of bidding farewell to Crossyears as they move ahead toward their fourth album. They’ve reportedly been at work on their next outing and even played some new material live on the aforementioned Fall tour, so it seems to me there’s a chance 2018 could bring that record to life at one point or another. Will be worth keeping an eye on for sure.

And in the meantime, the partnership between the band and Bryngel yields charm-laden dividends once again here with “Say Jupiter,” so check out the video below, followed by more info from the PR wire, and please enjoy:

Långfinger, “Say Jupiter” official video premiere

From Långfinger’s third full length album “Crossyears”, released September 30th, 2016 on Small Stone Records.

Directed, produced and edited by Anders Bryngel.

Långfinger:
Kalle Lilja – Guitars & backing vocals
Victor Crusner – Bass, keys & lead vocals
Jesper Pihl – Drums & backing vocals

Långfinger, from the fertile rock ‘n’ roll city of Gothenburg, have been playing together since they were in their early teens, and their third album, called ‘Crossyears’, is both the thrilling culmination of their collective endeavour, and a rumination on it – on how Time has shaped them and brought them to this point. Within its hard-hitting grooves, the interlocking of Långfinger’s three disparate characters – Kalle, the unflappable, precision axeman; Jesper, the athletic sticksman battering out physical revenge on his kit; and Victor, the intense, exploratory spirit, bridging thundering bass and howling exorcism – is a magical proposition.

Långfinger, Crossyears (2016)

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Cities of Mars, Temporal Rifts: Opening Doors of Dark Matter

Posted in Reviews on October 27th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

cities of mars temporal rifts

The year? 3251 BC. Martian civilization is in peril. There is a civil war taking place on the Red Planet and an evil scientist has just unveiled an army of mechanical spiders that may indeed turn the tide.

Such is the setting for at least part of Cities of Mars‘ debut album, Temporal Rifts. The Gothenburg-based trio’s first full-length arrives as their first release for Argonauta Records after two initial outings in the 2016 Suicide Records EP, Celestial Mistress (review here), and 2015’s self-released Cyclopean Ritual/The Third Eye (review here) single, both of which took place in the same canon being built by the sci-fi-driven heavy riffers. Their frame for narrative delivery has since that first single has been the discovery of this ancient Martian culture by a KGB agent named Nadia, somehow linked to the Celestial Mistress herself, and it seems that each new Cities of Mars track adds something distinct to the overarching tale or the setting in general.

Cities of Mars have been engaging in world-building all along, it seems, and Temporal Rifts is their deepest dive in that regard to-date, with five tracks and 35 minutes of what also happens to be the most complex material they’ve yet unfurled, moving fluidly from more straightforward and hook-driven fare in the opening salvo of “Doors of Dark Matter Pt. 1: Barriers” and “Envoy of Murder” (premiered here) to the post-Mastodonic progressive metal of “Children of the Red Sea” and from there even further into atmospheric depths. It seems time and storyline aren’t the only things Cities of Mars are exploring. After having felt their way through a nodding round of short releases, they’ve also clearly set themselves on a creative journey of sound as well.

All the better to avoid one of the most prevalent dangers when it comes to conceptual or narrative material, and that is the sacrifice of song to the story. Recorded by Esben Willems of Monolord at his Berserk Audio studio, Temporal Rifts doesn’t veer into spoken word interludes or feature dramatic character dialogue as some plot-fueled records do, but there’s still a strong sense of the material being tied together across an arc, and this is skillfully brought to bear while also allowing individual pieces to shine on their own. A hard balance to strike, but particularly by setting “Doors of Dark Matter Pt. 1: Barriers” and “Envoy of Murder” loose at the outset,  guitarist/vocalist Christoffer Norén, bassist/vocalist Danne Palm and drummer/vocalist Johan Küchler set a tone specifically geared toward the delivery of heavy hooks more akin to their early material.

cities of mars

This is rawer in style than what Temporal Rifts will begin to present once it moves into the centerpiece “Gula, a Bitter Embrace,” and into the eight-minute pairing of “Children of the Red Sea” and exclamatory closer “Caverns Alive!,” but the effect remains prevalent, allowing the later tracks to have a fuller context in answering the earlier ones through their own memorable parts as they also push well beyond in terms of ambience. In beginning that process, “Gula, a Bitter Embrace” is very much the centerpiece of Temporal Rifts and a key moment of methodoligical transition. At just under seven minutes long, it begins at a nod that reminds immediately of Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats through its initial riff, but soon unfolds a denser verse and an instrumental bridge topped with an airy lead from Norén. The march resumes for the next verse and carries Cities of Mars past the midsection, into a back third marked by a more melodic vocal arrangement and winding guitar progression. It turns out to be set to a linear build but caps with a significant payoff, but the patience in the band’s delivery thereof is a marked shift in approach alone, never mind the melody preceding or the winding lines of guitar at the foundation there.

It is as suitable a lead-in for the spacious beginning to “Children of the Red Sea” as one might ask, and though the penultimate track, which is the longest on Temporal Rifts at 8:27, shifts into sharper-edged riffing soon enough and makes its way into more intense chug-and-churn as it moves through its midsection, what follows starting at about 5:07 is a stretch of minimal, quiet guitar and cymbal washing, sparse sampling and other noises. They’re back to louder fare soon enough, pushing “Children of the Red Sea” to its apex, but the effect remains, and moaning vocals that started out the song return over the ending riff cycles, which give way to sampled wave sounds at the end, met by a doppler timed to the drums at the outset of “Caverns Alive!”

The closer also takes a linear course along a progressive and mindful execution, and like “Children of the Red Sea” with its vocals on either end, the doppler returns at the end of the finale, along with insistent percussion, capping Temporal Rifts with a symmetrical sensibility even beyond what Cities of Mars have already conjured through the LP’s structure. Although they’ve already shown significant growth from one outing to the next, it’s important to keep in mind that Temporal Rifts is still their debut outing, and that as much as they’ve begun to elucidate this engaging story of Nadia, Martian robot spiders and ancient mysteries, so too have they only really just begun their own story as well, and that it’s entirely likely the proggy aspects that show themselves here particularly in the final two cuts are the beginning chapters of an entirely different mythos.

Cities of Mars, Temporal Rifts (2017)

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Monolord, Rust: Shimmer in Dirt

Posted in Reviews on October 26th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

monolord rust

Over the course of the last four years, Gothenburg trio Monolord have worked efficiently on a mission to establish themselves among the heaviest of riff-driven bands the world over. Rust is their third album for RidingEasy Records behind the 2016 Lord of Suffering / Die in Haze EP (review here) and 2015’s Vænir (review here) and 2013’s debut Empress Rising full-lengths, and in some crucial ways it continues the thread. For example? It’s incredibly heavy. Should be said outright. Self-produced with drummer Esben Willems at the helm of Berserk Audio, it finds guitarist/vocalist Thomas V. Jäger, bassist Mika Häkki and Willems unfolding a molten cascade of riffy largesse worthy of the reputation they’ve earned from their studio output and corresponding significant time on tour. At the same time, however, it’s easier to read a narrative of progression within Monolord‘s sound even as the title-track lumbers into some of the record’s most weighted doom — the Swedish trio have grown melodically bolder, and Jäger‘s vocals, while still coated in effects, are more confident in their delivery than they were even two years ago.

As a unit, they were already on a progressive path coming from Empress Rising into Vænir, but the shift feels even more marked on Rust, particularly as it caps with its two longest inclusions, “Forgotten Lands” (12:45) and “At Niceae” (15:36), which seem to bring Monolord successively into new depths and new heights of places they’ve never explored before. While it’s not necessarily a shock that a band who’ve spent as much time on the road as Monolord have and who have two prior LPs under their collective belt would be coming into their own in terms of songwriting, the corresponding uptick of scope they present across Rust‘s 54 minutes isn’t to be understated, and as much heft as they offer, it’s the space they cover with it that impresses even more.

Naturally, when one hears the rumble that begins “Dear Lucifer” or the roll of “Where Death Meets the Sea,” the temptation is to think of Rust as a continuation of Monolord‘s seismic plod, but the truth is that by the first verse of “Where Death Meets the Sea,” which opens, they’re telling a more complex sonic story of where they are as a group. It would be an oversight to discount the vocal performance of Jäger in conveying this — almost immediately (there’s an intro to “Where Death Meets the Sea,” but we’re talking soon after that) he steps into a prominent frontman role in a way that simply wasn’t done on the last record or Empress Rising before it, and by setting that vibe early, he’s better able to maintain it even as the three-piece trudges later into the deep recesses of “Forgotten Lands” and “At Niceae.” But it’s not just his voice.

The guitar opens up to a subdued, almost airy tone during the verse, and while Häkki‘s bass adds plenty of oomph to the low end in the hook — yup, it’s a hook — as the five-plus-minute track unfolds, Monolord demonstrate an intention to do more than simply overwhelm with tonal weight. Though slower, “Dear Lucifer” ultimately does likewise, with the vocals out front of a progression that, while still about as post-Electric Wizard as the band get on Rust, is even more their own. Organ starts the title-track and provides a backdrop for the first minute, but recedes once the guitar, bass and drums kick in, bringing forth a densely-fuzzed march around a straightforward verse/chorus interchange that builds on what “Where Death Meets the Sea” accomplished with less back and forth interplay of volume, and a chugging second half bridge that, much to its credit, doesn’t veer into being overdone either before or after its last run through the hook en route to the ending guitar solo that brings about the instrumental “Wormland.”

monolord

I’m not sure where the sides/platters split for Rust, but it’s fair either way to say that “Wormland” feels as much like an introduction leading the way into “Forgotten Lands” and “At Niceae” as it does a capstone for the three shorter cuts before it. The groove comes easily and is maintained likewise across the six-minute instrumental piece, and a hypnotic effect from the early repetition is given further breadth through the arrival of violin just after the four-minute mark. like the verse of “Where Death Meets the Sea” or the heavy psych vibing that the last two tracks will touch on, this is yet another moment on Rust where the breadth comes into direct focus, though admittedly, in the case of “Forgotten Lands,” the overarching impression is much more geared toward weight than reach. Still, even as they seem to plummet downward into this low-end mire, they complement with higher-register vocals from Jäger to give a more rounded feel. And as thoroughly doomed as Rust is, that turns out to be the story of the album.

“Forgotten Lands” and “At Niceae” invariably define much of it, in a way the extended “Died a Million Times” and “Vænir” did at the end of Vænir, but as those two were split by the two-minute “The Cosmic Silence,” the way Monolord thrust their listeners into this world feels more brazen, and even more so as “Forgotten Lands” dips into its post-midpoint tripout, anchored by the bass as the weedy guitar goes wandering around dreamy layered vocals. They come back around to crush again and cap just before the 12-minute mark, which leaves silence as a transition into “At Niceae,” which strums YOB-like at the outset but soon enough moves into its own thundering roll, finding a defining fuzzy moment right around eight minutes in as a setup for instrumental hypnosis that gives way at 13 minutes to pure Floydian acoustics.

Vocals return and so does a line of electric guitar that marks the fadeout, but by then the pivotal shift in impression has been made and Monolord have sent the last confirmation of the growth they’ve undertaken as a band, no less striking than the tonal onslaught with which they first made their mark on an international audience. Their narrative may in part always remain centered around that consuming sonic largesse, but if Rust proves anything about Monolord, it’s that they’re still just beginning to reveal their full potential.

Monolord, Rust (2017)

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Review & Full Album Premiere: Firebreather, Firebreather

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on October 10th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

firebreather firebreather

[Click play above to stream Firebreather’s self-titled debut in its entirety. Album is out Friday, Oct. 13, via Suicide Records. Tour dates posted here.]

During their decade together, Sweden’s Galvano grew increasingly progressive in their delivery of semi-sludged metal, such that the chugging of their 2015 swansong, Trail of the Serpent, found them more in line with bands like The Ocean than the Black Cobra-style thrust proffered by their prior 2012 debut, Two Titans. Aligned to Candlelight, that two-piece was led by guitarist/vocalist Mattias Nööjd and would seem to have come to an end sometime after touring with Snailking and Zaum in Autumn 2015.

Nööjd resurfaces in Firebreather alongside bassist Kyle Pitcher and drummer Tommy Hanning, and in terms of relating to his past songwriting, it would seem he’s made clear efforts to get back to basics: pummel, tone, and push. Firebreather‘s self-titled debut runs a bone-crunching but totally manageable 33 minutes. Its four songs — “Fire Foretold” (7:09), “Emerald Eyes” (7:42), “The Ice Lord” (6:13) and “Release the Lava” (11:34) — split neatly into two vinyl sides, and the whole affair is somewhat unassuming on the surface. But just as the deep-toned Adam Burke cover art carries such a sense of illumination in darkness — just what fire has been lit in that cave? — so too does Firebreather‘s material soon unveil the breadth of its threat in the push and gallop that takes hold after the wind-swirl and nodding intro to “Fire Foretold,” Pitcher‘s bass leading a charge that, particularly when Hanning‘s steady snare joins and Nööjd adds his guttural vocals to start the first verse, feels almost singularly derived from High on Fire.

But not just any High on Fire, and not just any derivation. Early High on Fire. High on Fire at their most marauding, when the notion of taking filthy sludge tones and making them do things that only Celtic Frost and Slayer might otherwise dare was a novelty. This era — begun with their 1999 self-titled demo and continued onto 2000’s The Art of Self-Defense and 2002’s Surrounded by Thieves — is recognizable in the speedy immediacy of “Fire Foretold” as well as the lurching buildup that begins around the midpoint of “The Ice Lord,” and Nööjd‘s vocals are a big part of it, recalling pre-melody Matt Pike telling tales of monsters and conquests through material material that seems so violent one almost doesn’t notice how catchy it is; hello, “Emerald Eyes.” It’s more than just Nööjd‘s approach to singing though.

firebreather

In the structure of the lyrics and the rhythm of their delivery, one can hear it, and in the guitar and bass tones as well. These latter could be likened to a dull battle axe. That sounds like it’s not a compliment — wouldn’t one want to be sharp? — but if we keep with Firebreather in terms of representing a take on the aesthetic of formative High on Fire, the idea of the blade being dulled is crucial. A sharp blade cuts cleanly. It slices through: one swing. Swoop, done. It’s fresh, crisp. Maybe unused. A dull battle axe, on the other hand, maybe has a chip in one side of its blade from the neckbone of an enemy. It does not cut cleanly. When it cuts, it has to tear into chunks of raw meat its chosen target. The process is bloody, messy, full of gore. And the difference is one could argue High on Fire have become more and more sharpened over time, but in interpreting their influence on this self-titled, Firebreather dig back to the nastier, rounded edges that once so brutally cleaved the skulls of the unsuspecting.

Whether that’s done in the thud-and-churn in which “Emerald Eyes” is resolved or the broader epic-style storytelling that takes place across the fluid tempo shifts of “Release the Lava,” it’s a spirit Firebreather bring to life with marked purpose and a suitably righteous insistence, and despite the clear focus as regards their chief point of inspiration, their songs are not without an identity of their own. Particularly with the closer’s more patient delivery, rolling through its first two and a half minutes before the drums drop out to let the central riff be introduced and the first verse built toward, Nööjd, Pitcher and Hanning begin the process of carving out their niche, which includes some subtle, perhaps nascent use of melody in the still-from-the-gut shouted vocals that on “Fire Foretold” or “Emerald Eyes” hardly seemed to be a consideration despite layering in the hooks.

How Firebreather might continue to develop and distinguish themselves from their chief influence and from Nööjd‘s past efforts in Galvano, their debut presents a clear stylistic vision and intent — which is to say that the material doesn’t at all feel like it just stumbled into this sound. Rather, like a hilltop declaration of war, Firebreather‘s Firebreather sets forth with bludgeonry in mind and benefits from the knowledge of how to make it happen. It is the underlying memorability that comes through in the band’s songwriting, however, that will most let them flourish in the years and releases to come, and one hopes that as they storm the countryside on horseback spattering brain matter in their wake they remember that craft is the handle of the axe they so capably wield here.

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Firebreather Announce Tour Dates with Zaum; New Song Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 29th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

firebreather

Gothenburg-based three-piece Firebreather are gearing up to gallop off with hearts and minds — also presumably a soul or two — when they issue their self-titled debut EP via Suicide Records on Oct. 13. That same night, the band will head out on tour as support for Canadian ritualists Zaum, which makes sense when you keep in mind that the lineup for Firebreather boasts guitarist/vocalist Mattias Nööjd, who used to be in now-defunct bashers Galvano, with whom Zaum also toured. Maybe more than once, if I recall correctly.

In any case, it’s called continuity, so yeah, Firebreather and Zaum hitting the road together makes sense in part because of it. The other part is just because it makes sense, if you’re wondering.

Firebreather are streaming the new track “Fire Foretold” now, which leads off their EP. You can hear it at the bottom of this post.

The PR wire has more:

firebreather zaum tour poster

FIREBREATHER: EU tour dates with Canadian legends Zaum announced

FIREBREATHER EP is released on 13th October 2017 on Suicide Records

There’s no escaping the fact that Sweden is an incomparable breeding ground for some of the heaviest and most crushing metal bands in the world right now. Amon Amarth, Grand Magus, Candlemass, Vokonis, Monolord… all have crossed the water and duly conquered in recent years. In fact, even those yet to arrive can more often than not be found waiting in the wings, battle horn in hand heralding trepidation, Scandinavian-promise and riffs the size of long ships.

One such band waiting to scorch the earth upon which they land is Gothenburg trio FIREBREATHER who will release their self-titled debut album on Suicide Records this coming October. Relatively new to the fold having formed in the spring of 2016 from the ashes of underground doom heavyweights Galvano, FIREBREATHER is a devastatingly weighty statement of intent. Taking in four tracks that swallow time behind tooth shattering riffs from guitarist/vocalist Mattias Nööjd and crunching rhythms via bassist Kyle Pitcher and Tommy Hanning (newly replaced by drummer Fredrik Käll), FIREBREATHER are a jaw-breaking triptych of sludge and doom rock.

Mastered by Brad Boatright (Sleep, Corrosion of Conformity, Beastmilk, Obituary) at his Audioseige Studio in Portland, OR and featuring artwork by legendary underground artist Adam Burke, FIREBREATHER are out to make 2017 their own.

FIREBREATHER hit the road this October with Canadian legends Zaum for a number of dates across Europe.

FIREBREATHER live w/ ZAUM:
10/13 Kiel DE Alte Meirei
10/14 Hamburg** DE Astra Stube
10/15 Freiburg DE The White Rabbit
10/16 Torino IT Haram’s Graveyard
10/18 St. Feliu de Codines ES Inciviczone
10/19 Zaragoza ES Arrebato
10/20 Madrid ES TBC
10/21 Cascais PT Stairway Club
10/22 Galicia ES TBC
10/25 Zagreb HR Vintage Industrial
10/26 Brno C Bakjazyl
10/27 Szeged HU Grand Cafe
10/28 Carpi IT Ekinda
10/29 Bistrica ob Sotli SI Klub Metulj
10/30 Timisoara RO Club Daos
10/31 Plzen CZ TBC
11/03 Gothenburg SE Truckstop Alaska

FIREBREATHER:
Mattias Nööjd – Guitar, Vocals
Fredrik Käll – Drums
Kyle Pitcher – Bass

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Honeymoon Disease Premiere Lyric Video for “Four Stroke Woman”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 19th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

honeymoon disease

You’d probably never know it from how often I seem to repeat myself or get stuck on certain phrases, images, etc., but just about anything that turns a well-worn cliché on its head gets some automatic points in my book. Thus, if you’re looking at the title of the lyric video premiering below for Gothenburg, Sweden, heavy rockers Honeymoon Disease and thinking to yourself, “Really? Another lady-as-motor song? Does the world really need that?” I’ll ask you to take into account the following consideration: It’s not John Garcia, or Bon Scott, or Ian Gillan talking about “their woman” as a car or car part. It’s guitarist/vocalist Jenna Disease, and instead of objectification, the image becomes one of righteous declaration: “I’m a four stroke woman/A knucklehead, a devil in chains!”

It’s hard to overstate the importance of that distinction. Jenna — joined in the band by guitarist Acid Disease, drummer Jimi Disease (ex-Mamont) and bassist Cedrichoneymoon-disease-part-human-mostly-beasttakes ownership of the image, uses it across the subject/object divide, and so it becomes something closer to empowering. One could still argue that relating one’s existence to automotive repair is inherently dehumanizing, and I think there are arguments to be made on either side of adopting the tropes of discrimination as a means for empowerment in general — this happens in race as well as gender and economics as well — but there’s a big difference between saying you’re a huge fucking motor about to run someone over so let’s kick some ass and have a good time, and saying “my woman is a car and I’m going to drive her with my dude-parts.” I don’t care how you look at it, there’s a line there, and given that we’re bringing the lyrics directly into focus with a video in which they essentially star, it seems fair to point it out.

Did I mention the song rocks? Probably should emphasize that point as well. “Four Stroke Woman” comes from Honeymoon Disease‘s second full-length and first for The Sign RecordsPart Human, Mostly Beast, which is set to release on Oct. 27. The follow-up to the 2015 debut long-player, The Transcendence (discussed here), which was released by Napalm, it finds the band digging into prime boogie thrust without getting too lost in vintage-minded chicanery. You can hear a classic feel in “Four Stroke Woman” to be sure, but consider the clarity with which the song’s bassline comes through — friendly as hell, that one is — amid the forward push of the guitar, and you know which decade you’re in, one way or the other.

The band has some comment about the song and the album below, and more info follows along with preorder linkery from the PR wire.

Please enjoy:

Honeymoon Disease, “Four Stroke Woman” lyric video premiere

Honeymoon Disease on “Four Stroke Woman”:

“We live and breathe the motor culture, especially muscle cars and choppers. Acid rides motorcycles and our logo is a charger-68. Together with our action rock we create music that the motor community can relate to and ‘Four Stroke Woman’ is a salute to all bikers out there, female in particular, who dare to live the lifestyle that they desire without limits. Fast cars, furious bikes and rock ‘n’ roll, that is what’s it’s all about. And with a twist of avangarde mindset.”

Honeymoon Disease unleashes their new album “Part Human, Mostly Beast” the 27th of October on The Sign Records. The Swedish rock quartet’s second album is filled with high voltage pulse, colorful sounds and lots of groovy soul. Well acclaimed for their intense and high energetic stage performances the band have been one of the raising stars on the European rock stages, something the band have brought into the studio and recording the album live. Honeymoon Disease have worked with producer Ola Ersfjord (Imperial State Electric, Primordial, Tribulation, Dead Lord) since the recording of their last album “The Transcendence” (Napalm Records), something that led up to a recording session with better crafted songs, a more luxuries production and a lot of focus on the vocal arrangements.

Jimi Disease: “We wanted this album to have a more rough and lively feeling, as we are on stage. You should really hear the sweat from the jeans vest dripping out from the speakers.”

Tracklist:
1 – Doin’ it Again
2 – Only Thing Alive
3 – Tail Twister
4 – Rymdvals
5 – Needle In Your Eye
6 – Fly Bird, Fly High
7 – Calling You
8 – Four Stroke Woman
9 – Night By Night
10 – It’s Alright
11 – Coal Burnin’
12 – Electric Eel

The album is released on CD & Vinyl and as a bundle together with wunderbaum, bumpersticker and metal pin.

Pre-order from: http://freighttrain.se/en/

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Cities of Mars to Embark on Euro Tour Next Month

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 4th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Sweden’s Cities of Mars make their full-length debut on Sept. 29 with Temporal Rifts on Argonauta Records, and the three-piece have just announced a pretty extensive European tour by which they’ll support the record. Starting out Oct. 4 in their hometown of Gothenburg, they’ll pummel and roll through Germany, Denmark, Poland, the Czech Republic, France, Spain, Portugal, the UK and Switzerland, etc. before they’re done, though it looks like a goodly portion of the dates are still coming together. Of course if you happen to live in any of the areas listen as “open” below and can make something happen, do it, because it’s the right thing and because Cities of Mars are pretty gosh darn awesome. I still haven’t heard Temporal Rifts in its entirety, but the track “Enjoy of Murder” was premiered here back in July and you can hear it as well as the bottom of this post.

The band posted the following update via their Thee Facebooks page:

cities of mars tour

CITIES OF MARS – Temporal Rifts Tour 2017!

The tour is coming together! We’ll be covering a lot of ground on this one – happy to revisit cool venues and meet friends again! Also, we’ll be sharing the stage with a whole bunch of top bands.

We still have a few dates to book, so if you are a promotor, venue owner, festival/club organizer or whatever with a possible offer, please email booking.razoragency@gmail.com!

Our new album is available for preorder here: https://citiesofmars.bandcamp.com/album/temporal-rifts

See you on the road!

Tour dates:
October 4th – Gothenburg, Sweden – The Abyss (with Vokonis)
October 5th – Esbjerg, Denmark – TBC
October 6th – Potsdam, Germany – Archiv Potsdam (w/ Big Ugly Fat Fella & sun)
October 7th – Lubbenau – Germany – Kulturhof Lübbenau (w/Långfinger)
October 8th – Warsaw, Poland – Miejsce Chwila
October 9th – Katowice, Poland – TBC
October 10th – HELP! – AUSTRIA / CZECH REPUBLIC
October 11th – HELP! – AUSTRIA / CZECH REPUBLIC
October 12th – Vienna, Austria – Derwisch (w/ECHOLOT )
October 13th – Basel, Switzerland – Hirscheneck (w/ECHOLOT & Leaden Fumes)
October 14th – Freiburg, Germany – Kiez 57
October 15th – HELP! – Belgium / Germany / Netherlands
October 16th – HELP! – Belgium / Germany / Netherlands
October 17th – HELP! – Belgium / Germany / Netherlands
October 18th – Kiel, Germany – Alte Meierei Kiel (w/Lo! )
October 19th – Strasbourg, France – TBC
October 20th – London, UK – The Dev
October 21st – HELP! – UK
October 22nd – Coventry, UK – The Phoenix (The Discussion & Silverchild)
October 23rd – Antwerp, Belgium – Kid’s Rhythm ‘n’ Blues Kaffee
October 24th – Zaragoza, Spain – Utopía Sala
October 25th – Barcelona, Spain – TBA
October 26th – Caen, France – TBC
October 27th – Oldenburg, Germany – MTS LP STORE
October 28th – Berlin, Germany – TIEFGRUND
October 29th – Helsingor, Denmark – Musikhuset Elværket Helsingør (Dirt Forge)

https://www.facebook.com/citiesofmars
http://citiesofmars.bandcamp.com
https://instagram.com/citiesofmars/
http://www.citiesofmars.se/
https://www.facebook.com/ArgonautaRecords/
http://www.argonautarecords.com/

Cities of Mars, “Envoy of Murder”

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Långfinger Announce Fall 2017 European Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 17th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

langfinger (Photo by Bengt Persson)

Swedish classic-style heavy rockers Långfinger have announced a new round of European touring for this September and October. The Gothenburg three-piece will head out for a run through Germany, Belgium, and the Czech Republic beginning Sept. 28 as they continue to support their 2016 offering, Crossyears (review here), released by Small Stone in the US in conjunction with Cargo Records in Europe.

Though they’re still young, Långfinger are fast becoming veterans of Europe’s heavy rock underground. With Crossyears as their third album behind 2010’s Skygrounds and 2012’s Slow Rivers, the band have more and more refined their sense of songcraft to make their tracks organic, memorable and engaging in their blend of ’70s roots and modern impulses. Earlier this year, they hit the road alongside labelmates Captain Crimson to represent two of Sweden’s strongest upstart presences in next-generation riffage.

Dates for the upcoming autumnal run and more info follow here, courtesy of the PR wire:

langfinger tour poster

Långfinger Autumn Tour
28/9 Kiel (DE) – Schaubude
29/9 Oldenburg (DE) – MTS LP’s & CD’s
30/9 La Louviere (BE) – La Taverne du Theatre
1/10 Rodewisch (DE) – Ars Vitae
2/10 Prague (CZ) – Fatal Club
3/10 Pod?brady (CZ) – Boss Bar
4/10 Kolin (CZ) – Bar Pod Hodinama
6/10 Weimar (DE) – Kasseturm
7/10 Lubbeneu (DE) – Kulturhof

Poster design by: Thomas V. Jäger from Monolord.

Långfinger, from the fertile rock ‘n’ roll city of Gothenburg, are masters of the art. They’ve been playing together since they were in their early teens, and their third album, called ‘Crossyears’, is both the thrilling culmination of their collective endeavour, and a rumination on it – on how Time has shaped them and brought them to this point. Within its hard-hitting grooves, the interlocking of Långfinger’s three disparate characters – Kalle, the unflappable, precision axeman; Jesper, the athletic sticksman battering out physical revenge on his kit; and Victor, the intense, exploratory spirit, bridging thundering bass and howling exorcism – is a magical proposition.

Långfinger:
Kalle Lilja – Guitars & backing vocals
Victor Crusner – Bass, keys & lead vocals
Jesper Pihl – Drums & backing vocals

https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/crossyears
https://www.facebook.com/Langfingerofficial/
http://langfinger.net/

Långfinger, Crossyears (2016)

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