Komodor Stream Self-Titled Debut EP in its Entirety

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on January 10th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Komodor are set to release their self-titled debut EP tomorrow, Jan. 11, through Soulseller Records. It’s the French band’s first offering of any kind, and yeah, there are certainly no shortage of enticing associations, what with the fact that Blues Pills bassist Zack Anderson recorded and that he and his entire group put in guest appearances on it, with vocalist Elin Larsson sitting in on three of the four songs — what, you’re gonna just have her on one? no way — and guitarist Dorian Sorriaux sits in as well on “Nasty Habits” with André Kvarnström and Rickard Nygren adding further boogie to the classic garage fuzz of that piece, which follows the particularly Grand Funky “Join the Band.” The core four-piece of guitarist/vocalist Slyde Barnett, guitarist Ronnie Calva, bassist Goudzou and drummer Elrik Monroe reserve closer “1984” for themselves, and fair enough for that track’s relatively straightforward arrangement, but of course by the time they get there in rounding out their brisk 17-minute offering, Komodor have already well established their put-on-your-shuffle-shoes penchant for heavy ’10s boogie as filtered through post-Kadavar naturalist production and live-feeling performance.

That finale in “1984” is also the shortest cut on the EP, so perhaps its guest-less arrangement is meant to further convey an idea on the part of the band of something simpler and more direct musically. Though Komodor aren’t exactly komodor komodorlacking efficiency in the rest of the material either, as opener “Still the Same” launches with analog-warmth and an earworm hook to lead the way through, and if initial EPs are intended to showcase what a band has to offer, Komodor come ready to dance. They’ve got their aesthetic nailed down and their songcraft wants nothing for organics in terms either of construction or execution. As Larsson backs Barnett in “Still the Same,” Calva‘s fuzzy lead seems to join the chorus and Goudzou and Monroe offer rhythmic propulsion that sets the tone for the rest of the release to come. There’s a definite sense of flow to what Komodor have on offer here — with so much groove around, there would almost have to be — and that carries right into “Join the Band,” which veers from its thrusting verse and suitably inviting chorus into an extended guitar solo before ending cleanly with a last run through the chorus. “Nasty Habits” makes good use of the guest piano for a honky-tonk boogie vibe, mellowing out in the second half, but only to set up the party explosion that soon follows, leading to the going-it-alone capper “1984,” which shows that even left to their own devices, Komodor have no problem letting their songs speak well for them.

The question that remains after listening to Komodor‘s Komodor is just how much over the long term the EP will represent their sound. I’m not just talking about vintage-style bands evolving a more modern sound as they move forward — as Blues Pills have done — but how a full-length would come across with the band on their own. Either way, if this collection is helping the four-piece get to the point of running on their own legs, it’s an encouraging first step, and their collaboration with Anderson and the rest of his band is just one of the songs’ appeals. In the end, their songs have to hold up as they are, and they do, so something tells me Komodor will be just fine.

You can hear Komodor‘s Komodor a day early on the player below. More info from the PR wire info follows.

Please enjoy:

KOMODOR’s first release, a self-titled mini album, will be published on 11th January 2019 on CD, 12” LP and in digital formats.

It features guest appearances by the entire BLUES PILLS band, whose bassist Zack Anderson even recorded the four songs. Inspired by MC5, James Gang, Grand Funk Railroad and many more, KOMODOR invites you to their journey through rock’n’roll!

Check out a first little teaser at this location: https://youtu.be/L6VAd755ljY

Tracklist:
1. Still The Same
2. Join The Band
3. Nasty Habits
4. 1984

Line-up:
Goudzou – Bass
Elrik Monroe – Drums
Ronnie Calva – Lead Guitar
Slyde Barnett – Lead Vocals & Guitar

Komodor on Thee Facebooks

Komodor on Instagram

Soulseller Records website

Soulseller Records on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , ,

Belzebong & The Necromancers Announce Spring Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 27th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

belzebong

the necromancers

Hey, if it works, don’t mess with it. Poland’s Belzebong and France’s The Necromancers toured together this past Fall and they’ll head out once more in March on an apparent second leg of their run together. The shows are presented by Sound of Liberation, and with Belzebong having released Light the Dankness (review here) in the meantime as The Necromancers continue to support their second LP, Of Blood and Wine (review here), it’s all the more an occasion. One assumes the bands must have gotten along pretty well or the tour wouldn’t be happening after the first one, so that’s kind of an awesome atmosphere to think of. Shows are better when the bands playing are having a good time. Thus spake science.

Sound of Liberation posted the following dates before breaking for the holidays:

belzebong necromancers tour

We couldn’t leave for our little x-mas/new year’s break without giving you one more tour set for the spring!

Just back from the road 3 weeks ago, BelzebonG & The Necromancers will team up again in March/April for the second leg of their “Purveyors of Dankness” Tour!

Still some dates missing, but most of the tour is here:
19.03.19 (D) Dresden / Chemiefabrik (Belzebong Only)
20.03.19 (D) Osnabrück / Westwerk (Belzebong Only)
21.03.19 (NL) Nijmegen / Merleyn
23.03.19 (FR) Le Havre / CEM (Belzebong Only)
25.03.19 (UK) Bristol / The Lanes
27.03.19 (UK) Glasgow / Nice N Sleazy
29.03.19 (UK) Cardiff / TBC
30.03.19 (UK) Manchester / Riffolution Festival
31.03.19 (UK) London / The Underworld
03.04.19 (D) Hamburg / Molotow
04.04.19 (DK) Copenhagen / Stengade
05.04.19 (D) Cottbus / Zum Faulen August
06.04.19 (CZ) Prag / 007

Polish heavy-doomfuzz-metal outfit BELZEBONG started in 2008, and since then they bring tons of evil weedian riffage for persistent ones. The band drowns themselves in a sea of distortion and fuzz, and after their appearances at prestigious festivals such as Stoned From The Underground, Desertfest Berlin & London, fans of Doom Metal have found a new hero in the scene!

From Progressive Rock to Doom Metal, THE NECROMANCERS’ music is a condensed hybrid of muddy influences emerging from fuzzy and mesmerising witchy riffs, metallic passion, and thickened doom. Think of an unhappy encounter between dark gods at the corner of a foggy street and you’ll get a feeling.

https://www.facebook.com/belzebong420/
www.soundofliberation.com/belzebong

https://www.facebook.com/thenecromancersband/
www.soundofliberation.com/the-necromancers

Belzebong, Light the Dankness (2018)

The Necromancers, Of Blood and Wine (2018)

Tags: , , , , ,

Endless Floods to Release Circle the Gold Feb. 15

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 17th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Endless Floods

Bordeaux-based post-sludge rockers Endless Floods will release their third full-length, Circle the Gold, on Feb. 15. The album follows early 2017’s II (review here), and is comprised of two massive tracks, each one consuming an LP side, that follow a similar extended-form model to the preceding record. Unsurprisingly, ambience is a big factor throughout the offering, but as it carries as much weight in its open spaces as in its most crush-minded tonality, the multifaceted approach only emphasizes both ends of its range. That is, the heavier parts hit harder for the quiet parts, and vice versa. One hypnotic rhythm to the next, except the next one might crack your skull.

Album info came down the PR wire like so:

Endless Floods Circle the Gold

ENDLESS FLOODS “Circle The Gold” Out February 15th on Fvtvrecordings and Bigout Records

Ambient doom unit ENDLESS FLOODS return with new album “Circle The Gold” on February 15th via Fvtvrecordings/Bigout Records.

France’s breakthrough doom metal trio ENDLESS FLOODS return on February 15th, 2019 with their third album “Circle The Gold” on Fvtvrecordings and Bigout Records.

A realm of darkness awaits. France’s cathartic doom specialists ENDLESS FLOOD formed in 2015 in Bordeaux around Stephane Miollan (Monarch, Bombardement), Benjamin Sablon (Bombardement, Shock) and Simon Bédy. With “no boundaries in heaviness” as a motto, they raise a prodigiously thick wall of sound by blending doom and sludge aesthetics with mind-expanding ambient metal structures. A sorrowful procession arising from the limbo…

The trio released their self-titled debut in 2015, then quickly returned with their sophomore full-length “II” in January 2017 (Dry Cough Records/Fvtvrecordings/Breathe Plastic). This minimalist, drone-sounding assault saw the band digging deeper within the realm of bleakness they created on “Endless Floods”, immersing the listener in a hulking, feedback-laden sonic experience while contemplating 20+ minute-long monoliths “Impasse” and “Procession”. “II” was praised by numerous international outlets.

New album Circle The Gold” results from a year-long reassessment among the trio and symbolises a fresh start in their creative process. Over the span of 40 minutes and two songs, it sees the band evolve towards a more melodic aspect of their sound. Like the first ray of light shining through the gloom after a violent storm, both songs slowly move from impressively majestic chaos driven by cathartic screams and unfettered echoing solos, to almost-meditative and unadulterated moments of peace.

ENDLESS FLOODS states: “Circle The Gold was written, recorded, then deleted, re-written, recorded again and finalised over the course of two years. We started working on it right after the “II” recordings in the spring of 2016. In March 2017, we went to Amanita studio to record three songs. But afterwards, we broke off all creative process, rehearsals, and nearly put the band on hiatus.

A few months later, we relaunched the band and decided to start all over again, and rethink the album to achieve what we had in mind in the first place. We wanted to free ourselves from any songwriting stereotype and follow our own path. Start again to do better, turn a page and move on. The two songs on « Circle The Gold » deal with this tough period around the album making, relationship within a band, friendship and personal experiences.”

“Circle The Gold” was recorded and mixed at Amanita studio in Anglet (France) by Stephan Krieger, and mastered by Brad Boatright at Audiosiege (USA).

ENDLESS FLOODS IS
Stéphane Miollan – Bass & Vocals
Simon Bédy – Guitar
Benjamin Sablon – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/endlessfloods/
https://endlessfloods.bandcamp.com/
http://www.bigoutrecords.com/
https://fvtvrecordings.bandcamp.com/

Endless Floods, II (2017)

Tags: , , , , , ,

Review & Full Album Stream: Huata, Lux Initiatrix Terrae

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 22nd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

huata lux initiatrux terrae cover

[Click play above to stream Huata’s Lux Initiatrix Terrae in full. Album is out Nov. 23 on Sludgelord Records, Seeing Red Records and Musicfearsatan.]

Songs become grandiose riff ceremonies and the album as a whole becomes a ritual rooted in harmonized meditations and weighted progressive instrumentalism. Atmosphere is paramount. Texture is everywhere. And if it’s a ritual, then despite their penchant for donning a robe or two, France’s Huata bring a feeling of celebration to their second album, Lux Initiatrix Terrae, and that pushes beyond horror-minded cultish tropes. Those themes may be somewhere in 15-minute opener “Mythical Beast of Revelations,” to be sure, but they’re buried so deep beneath organ and the vocal work of Ronan Grall, who also handles drums and is joined in the band by guitarist/bassist Benjamin Moreau, that they’re harder to discern in the first place. The Brittany duo work primarily in longform stretches across the willfully unmanageable 68-minute runtime, with five tracks over 10 minutes long and two interludes under three, and Moreau and Grall bring in a host of outside players — presumably to contribute vocals and keys, etc. — to help them flesh out the ensuing complexity of the material. Five other names are credited: Gurvan Coulon, David Barbe, Alexis Degrenier, Laetitia Jehano, Marion Le Sollier, but as to who does what, it’s unclear.

In any case, the resulting contributions of all parties are wildly immersive, as between the bookends of “Mythical Beast of Revelations” and 16-minute closer “Third Eyed Nation,” the band unfolds a perpetually widening cascade of moods and sounds, such that the eerie organ and synth in the closer are consistent in approach with what’s preceded even as they seem to reach further into a kind of colorful abyss — Huata‘s sound too rich and too vibrant to simply conjure images of light-absent emptiness. Theirs is the proverbial shining void, and their material finds them churning this multi-hued, potent cauldron of sound with witchy glee, even as their overarching direction seems to be intent on taking them downward into it.

There’s a dichotomy there, and it’s brought to life in the recording and mix of Cyrille Gachet (Year of No Light, Chaos Echoes, The Great Old Ones), which allows for a broad reach between the Electric Wizard-gone-interstellar start of “Child of the Cosmic Mind,” samples and organ and low riffs all circling around each other in slowly building wash, but it’s elements like the tone of the guitar and bass, the compression effects on the oft-harmonized vocals and the inclusion of various keys — church organ among them and feeling particularly appropriate, given the overall aesthetic — that tie everything together and make Lux Initiatrix Terrae so fluid. The distorted heft comes and goes, but so do nearly all the other elements at work throughout, as nothing seems to be permanent or beyond the band’s reach. A slow march in “The Solar Work” picks up where “Child of the Cosmic Mind” leaves off, and might be the closest thing to a title-track present on the album, the first and last word of which are Latin for “light” and “world” and the middle which puts together ideas of beginnings and so that it’s something like light begetting the world — “The Solar Work” doesn’t seem so far off from that.

huata lux initiatrux terrae

Either way, in the second half of the 10:35 piece, the vocals give way to melodic shouts in a kind of relative apex, but by then the idea is made plain that repetition is a key part of this ritual. Huata‘s songs — reminiscent of more recent Ancestors in their vocal approach and progressive lean — are mantras. It’s not going to be about hooks or about roping the listener in with a catchy solo or sharp rhythmic turn. The three-song salvo tops 36 minutes and is an album unto itself, let alone the second LP that follows it as the 2:50 “Part I – Gathering in Sin Wur” makes its way via organ and soft guitar toward the lung-crushing weight — worthy of whatever comparisons to Slomatics or Conan or Ufomammut one might want to draw — and ranging scale-work melody of “The Golden Hordes of Kailash,” which furthers the thread of a purposeful delve into hypnotics, a post-midsection break meshing together different layers of keys in order to set the stage for a return to the nodding, lumbering push that draws the listener back into the multi-tiered wash of distortion and melody before what even after 10-plus minutes feels like a sudden stop.

The second interlude, “Part II – The IXth Arch Assembly” follows the diversionary modus of its predecessor, drifting with soft guitars and underlying keys that resolve in wistful notes ahead of the arrival of “Third Eyed Nation,” which makes its way in gradually — of course — with complementary ambience before the vocals start less than a minute in. Those expecting a grand finale after what’s already been an hour-long listen should be sated by “Third Eyed Nation,” which even in its first half seems to signal its spot as culmination of the proceedings, though after seven minutes, the drums cut out and a stretch of spoken samples and almost siren-esque synth sounds in a high frequency and others in a lower frequency take hold before guitar sneaks back in to signal the return of the tonal onslaught and the beginning of the real apex.

They get there, in other words, and frankly, if one is making the journey through Lux Initiatrix Terrae and gets as far as “Third Eyed Nation,” the expectation that Huata are going to take their time getting to where they want to go should be well ingrained. It’s hard to imagine making it across the songs otherwise, since that head-down, prog-tinged dirge vibe is so writ large and so consistent throughout the material. That’s not to say Moreau and Grall don’t make efforts to change their approach in terms of surroundings, personnel and mood, but the aspects of their sound that they carry with are what enable them to create the world that one seems to inhabit while listening. And one of Lux Initiatrix Terrae‘s greatest strengths stems from the band’s ability to put the listener in the mindset they intend, the place they intend. That world may be created by light, I don’t know, and it may certainly be chaotic, but Huata guide their audience through it with a sure hand that’s well evocative of the dogma they’ve envisioned.

Huata on Thee Facebooks

Huata on Bandcamp

Musicfearsatan on Thee Facebooks

Musicfearsatan webstore

Sludgelord Records on Thee Facebooks

Sludgelord Records on Bandcamp

Seeing Red Records on Thee Facebooks

Seeing Red Records on Bandcamp

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Review & Full Album Premiere: Little Jimi, EP.1

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 12th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Little Jimi EP 1

[Click play above to stream Little Jimi’s debut LP, EP.1, in its entirety. Album is out Nov. 16 and available to preorder from Mars Red Sound.]

Doesn’t feel like a rash assumption to imagine who “Big Jimi” might be in this case, but Little Jimi is both the name of the band and the character whose story said band is telling. And while we’re on the subject of names, EP.1 is the somewhat counterintuitive title given to Little Jimi‘s debut LP, stemming from the fact that before they added the songs “Dock 11” and “Midnight Mojo” to close out sides A and B, respectively, it was their first EP, given the much more telling title: First EP. If it helps to think of EP.1 as an abbreviation of “episode one,” then fair enough, but at six songs and 38 minutes, it is an LP, and a smooth-flowing one at that. The heavy psychedelic rocking three-piece of guitarist/vocalists Guillaume Arancibia and Benjamin Monnereau and drummer Antoine Le Gall are based in Bordeaux, France, and given their propensity for trippy space-making, weighted low end, melodic range and rolling groove — not to mention the fact that they’re releasing through the label Mars Red Sound — a comparison to Mars Red Sky feels somewhat inevitable.

But if it’s to be a question of character in the songwriting, Little Jimi have their own both literally and figuratively, and the album finds its own reaches to inhabit apart from that influence, as one would hope it would. From opener “Jimi” through the memorable bounce of “Goodbye Katus” and the patient delivery of the stick-clicking in “Midnight Mojo,” Little Jimi present an engaging depth of mix and a varied craft built on a sense of narrative cohesion that nonetheless proves able to affect a hypnotic jamming vibe when it so chooses, as on that eight-minute finale track, rife with wah-laden guitar soloing, swinging drums and a fervent forward drive in its resolution. There is little about their presentation one could call pretentious from the natural sound of the recording style on down through the construction of the songs themselves, and whether one engages with the story of Jimi himself and his friend Katus — who might be a teddy bear — or not, there’s still a rich listening experience on offer.

Of course I’m not going to tell you to discount the quest of Jimi as he for some reason leaves home and looks for a new existence. The lyrics indeed present the first episode of his tale, from the introduction in the first song through the departure of a train at the end of “Goodbye Katus” with a journey in between. It’s not at all so plainly obvious what’s happening at any given moment — that is, Little Jimi haven’t exactly written a rock opera — but they’ve set themselves in the first-person, and it works well with their aesthetic, tapping inspiration from the progressive textures of Pink Floyd in “Molimoh” at the outset of side B while the opening rollout of “Jimi” hits into minor-key instrumental melodies even before the vocals arrive, giving a somewhat foreboding atmosphere throughout a spacious initial verse while building tension into the instrumental chorus.

little jimi tour poster

Though neither Arancibia nor Monnereau are credited with playing bass live, there is definitely a low end presence on the album itself, whether that’s layered in on the recording amid two guitars or just one of those guitars doing a bass impression. In either case, EP.1 lacks nothing as regards tonal presence, and among the primary elements of the band’s skillset is creating a molten atmosphere early that solidifies into a later thrust. It’s not quite the same as a straight linear build on “Jimi,” because the song works back and forth between its verse and instrumental chorus, but there is a sense of direction all the same. With its whispers and swirling, flute-like effects, there’s a likewise forward push in “Lamp Song,” though that actually is more of a linear build, brought to a head twice over the course of the song’s five and a half minutes, so there’s some structural variation as well. Naturally, that’s only to the band’s advantage as they tell their tale.

Or rather, as they begin it, because as much as there’s an ending — that train departs in “Goodbye Katus” and I’m not entirely sure what’s happening in the semi-spoken parts of “Midnight Mojo,” but we’ve left the station, so to speak — Little Jimi seem intent in the spirit of modern cinematics to set themselves up for a sequel. In that regard, “Dock 11” and “Midnight Mojo” feel extra crucial, since they represent the newest material on the record. And sure enough, they’re the most sonically adventurous, with bold diversions of guitar in “Dock 11” amid a rhythmic insistence and a tight sub-five-minute runtime and the aforementioned jam-out in “Midnight Mojo” during which they seem to capitalize on the fluidity they’ve been able to build up throughout “Molimoh” and “Goodbye Katus” while bringing themselves to even new places. In addition to this, one finds a greater depth of arrangement in these newer tracks, with acoustic guitar layered into “Dock 11” to highlight a sentimental feel. That’s less the case with “Midnight Mojo,” but amid all the Hendrixery it’s nonetheless noteworthy that Little Jimi showcase such a penchant for changing up their methods even in these two tracks, let alone the album of which they’ve been made a part.

As to what the next episode of Little Jimi‘s voyage might hold, or whether the band might drop the thread entirely and pursue other avenues, I wouldn’t want to speculate. Their showcase here, frankly, is enough for the moment in introducing their style to audience and creating a flow that only grows more immersive as the album plays out. There may be more to come in this thread, but as a first installment, EP.1 holds as much promise for the narration itself as for the plotline, and again, whether a given listener is inclined to follow Jimi’s adventure with each footfall or step back and see the whole picture as it’s presented in these tracks, it’s clearly a story worth hearing.

Little Jimi on Thee Facebooks

Little Jimi on Bandcamp

Mars Red Sound webstore

Tags: , , , , ,

Komodor Announce Debut EP Release for Jan. 11

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 31st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

komodor (Photo by Clara Josephine Camille Pensec)

Boogie rock newcomers Komodor have set a Jan. 11, 2019, release for their self-titled debut EP. Respected purveyor Soulseller Records will handle the pressing of the French four-piece’s first offering, which is a rousing endorsement in itself, and there’s a teaser for the EP that you can stream at the bottom of this post. Those experienced in the modern interpretations of classic forms that the heavy ’10s have brought will find the ground familiar enough, but being a new band, Komodor seem to bring a good amount of energy to what they’re playing.

Also significant, the entirety of Blues Pills appears on the EP and their bassist, Zack Anderson, handled recording duties. I know Blues Pills guitarist Dorian Sorriaux is based in France, so maybe that’s the connection, but it’s something of a surprise to have the whole band Blues Pills involved. “Join the Band” indeed. I’d also wonder whether the recording took place in France or Sweden, but either way, an organic vibe persists.

The PR wire has the art and release details:

komodor ep self titled

KOMODOR – Debut EP announcement

Do you wanna have a good time? Are you ready to rumble? Back from the 70’s, here we are!

Soulseller Records is proud to announce the signing of French psychedelic rockers KOMODOR!

Their first release, a self-titled mini album, will be published on 11th January 2019 on CD, 12” LP and in digital formats.

It features guest appearances by the entire BLUES PILLS band, whose bassist Zack Anderson even recorded the four songs. Inspired by MC5, James Gang, Grand Funk Railroad and many more, KOMODOR invites you to their journey through rock’n’roll!

Check out a first little teaser at this location: https://youtu.be/L6VAd755ljY

Tracklist:
1. Still The Same
2. Join The Band
3. Nasty Habits
4. 1984

Line-up:
Goudzou – Bass
Elrik Monroe – Drums
Ronnie Calva – Lead Guitar
Slyde Barnett – Lead Vocals & Guitar

https://www.facebook.com/KOMODORBAND
https://www.instagram.com/komodor_band/
http://www.soulsellerrecords.com
https://www.facebook.com/SOULSELLERRECORDS

Komodor debut EP teaser

Tags: , , , ,

Little Jimi to Release EP.1 Nov. 16

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 3rd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Little Jimi

So, at 38 minutes, EP.1 is kind of disingenuous as a title. It’s not really an EP, but it was when Little Jimi self-released it in 2017. Released part of it, anyway. Then titled First EP according to the band’s Bandcamp page, it was a four-tracker that’s no been expanded to six and is set to release Nov. 16 through Mars Red Sound, the imprint helmed by fellow Bordeaux, France, natives Mars Red Sky. The two additional tracks are both newer and longer than anything before them on the EP, so maybe it’s a chance to get a glimpse at where Little Jimi are headed with their equal parts raucous and spacious heavy psych, while also giving a well-deserved second look at their first offering. The wash of the closer in particular, and how well the enact it and pull it back, seems to speak well of things to come. Especially in November.

From the PR wire:

Little Jimi EP 1

Garage psych trio LITTLE JIMI to release debut album “EP.1” on November 16th via MRS Red Sound.

South France garage psych rockers LITTLE JIMI announce the release of their debut album “EP. 1”, to be issued November 16th on vinyl and digital via MRS Red Sound.

When the power of the riff meets the hope-filled haziness of the 70s, when aerial vocals and two fuzzy guitars echo in unison, propelled by a powerful and surgical drumming… You feel the heat of South France’s garage psych rockers LITTLE JIMI carrying you into the wilderness of their debut album “EP.1”. The album tells the frantic story of little kid Jimi and his friend Katus, who are on the path to a new life, caught between wiseness and some darker auspices.

Firmly rooted in a modern heavy sound supported by strong dynamics, the power trio still shares the same love for vintage psychedelia as the likes of Birth Of Joy, The Black Angels or The Psychotic Monks. “EP.1” was initially released as a 4-track CD in the fall of 2017, and will be reissued with two brand new songs on November 16th, 2018 on limited 180gr 12” edition vinyl and digital via MRS Red Sound.

LITTLE JIMI – Debut album “EP. 1”
Out November 16th on MRS Red Sound
– Vinyl pre-order from Oct. 16th –

https://www.facebook.com/LittleJimi.music/
https://littlejimi.bandcamp.com/releases
https://marsredsky.bigcartel.com/products

Little Jimi, First EP (2017)

Tags: , , , , ,

Review & Track Premiere: The Necromancers, Of Blood and Wine

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 26th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

the necromancers of blood and wine

[Click play above to hear the premiere of ‘The Gathering’ from The Necromancers’ Of Blood and Wine. Album is out Oct. 5 on Ripple Music.]

Of Blood and Wine is the second full-length from The Necromancers in as many years, and among its accomplishments of songwriting and aesthetic craft, what it does is to bring into focus the direction of the band. Their Ripple Music-issued debut, Servants of the Salem Girl (review here), utilized many of the same stylistic elements — it’s only been a year, after all — but in hindsight was only hinting at the start of a development underway, and while it was easy to get caught up in the blend of cult rock, doom, heavy vibes and ’70s-style boogie that underscored the work of the Poitiers, France, four-piece, with the six tracks and 44 minutes of Of Blood and Wine, they showcase another aspect of their sound that was very much there all along: its forward potential. In some cases, like the swaying groove and bluesy leads in the first-half buildup of the 10-minute penultimate “Lust,” it’s a question of patience and production.

While there’s still an urgency and a tension at work, particularly in its later reaches, “Lust” is emblematic of the development in both, but from the uptempo boogie of opener “Join the Dead Ones” — adding a bit of Ghost in guitarist Tom Cornière‘s vocals during the verse before the gruff chorus takes hold, fueled by his own riffs and the deft rhythmic turns of bassist Simon Evariste and drummer Benjamin Rousseau while Robin Genais‘ leads mark the transition back to the verse afterward — to the consuming fullness of tone brought forth in closer “The Gathering,” The Necromancers hone an engrossing fluidity through a graceful two-sided offering that, even more than the debut, makes their approach their own. To wit, the post-Iron Maiden gallop and “Heaven and Hell” bassline in second track and longest cut “Erzebeth” (12:41) combine with Cornière‘s melodic and shouted vocals and the general warmth of tone in the recording to create something classic in its root but thoroughly modern in presentation.

One gets the sense that these will only continue to become key elements The Necromancers‘ collective sonic persona, but rather than let the listener speculate on where they might go, Of Blood and Wine demands attention in the now, “Erzebeth” stomping toward its midsection beneath a switched-on plotted solo from Genais that leads to proggy shuffle in an instrumental jam and one of the record’s more fervent thrusts. It’s not until nearly 10 minutes in that the vocals return, and from their spoken comeback, The Necromancers cleverly make their way back to the hook to close out and give way to the quiet 2:39 brooder of a title-track, a showcase for Cornière‘s emergence as a frontman — a not insignificant subplot to the album — and a demonstration of the diversity of approach in the core of their songwriting. It is much to their credit that Of Blood and Wine flows as easily as it does, and that they never seem out of place through their stylistic changes or to lose the overarching atmosphere that’s so crucial in tying the songs together.

the necromancers

To an extent, side A and B mirror each other. Both begin with an upbeat 5:44 kick in “Join the Dead Ones” and “Secular Lord,” though the latter dispenses with the first-minute album-intro-style riff in favor of a more immediate push, and then move into longer fare with “Erzebeth” on side A and “Lust” on side B. It’s in the third cut on each side that the real departure happens, since side A rounds out with “Of Blood and Wine” and side B caps with “The Gathering”‘s seven-minute doomery, making its way with due moodiness and a bit of subtlety to the final payoff of the entirety, with extra impact seeming to come from Rousseau‘s bassdrum and Evariste‘s low end as they stomp noisily out, ending with a horror sample of chains and screams and a ringing bell. Witch burning? It would be on theme, if nothing else. Either way, that conclusion comes after The Necromancers find their most active swing on “Secular Lord,” with its catchy central riff and adrenaline-fueled build in the second half, the band leaving behind some of their ’70s-ism in favor of harder-hitting push.

There’s room in “Lust” for both sides to come together, but it’s important again to consider the fluidity with which the band execute their material. They’re not in a rush, and they’re never really still, even on the title-track, but with an excellent sense of tempo and rhythmic motion, they build a momentum in fast and slow, loud and quiet movements that allows for the exploration in the middle third of “Lust” to have a context beyond itself, so that it’s not necessarily about indulgence so much as expanding the atmosphere of the album as a whole. It also serves in its emergent and fleeting heft as a precursor to what the closer has on offer, and one can hear again how the pieces tie to each other as “Lust” hits its climax with a last chorus and “The Gathering” creeps its way in with a first minute not entirely dissimilar from what started “Join the Dead Ones” before its full nod unfurls, topped with chants and turning to a spacious verse that trades back to the full-boar riff and chanting as a kind of semi-hook.

Much of the second half of the finale is given to the capstone movement, and rightly so. When one considers Of Blood and Wine as a whole work, its end in the final three or four minutes of “The Gathering” is nothing if not earned, and it underscores just how clearly The Necromancers intend that the album should be taken in its entirety. I said earlier that one doesn’t want to speculate about where they’ll go sonically their next time out, and I stick by that as they could develop in any number of directions, but a central achievement of their sophomore offering is that it brings their influences together into a cohesive, malleable oneness that is theirs almost entirely, while also highlighting the potential unfolding in their craft. That one should think of their future prospects while hearing these songs is something in itself, but more important is the realization that The Necromancers are already beginning to bring that potential to fruition.

The Necromancers on Thee Facebooks

The Necromancers on YouTube

Ripple Music website

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,