The Sonic Dawn Stream “Young Love, Old Hate”; Enter the Mirage Preorder Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 31st, 2019 by JJ Koczan

the sonic dawn

What hidden psychedelic treasures will a new full-length from The Sonic Dawn unearth? Remains to be seen, but they’re dropping a good-sized hint in the unveiling the organ-laced lead track “Young Love, Old Hate” from the forthcoming Heavy Psych Sounds release, which has been given the title Enter the Mirage and a March 27 release date. First of all, it’s short, in the ’60s psych-pop tradition to which the trio have remained loyal, and second it’s catchy. Third, and most important, it’s deceptively intricate. The vocal arrangements, the key arrangement, the guitar tones — nothing there is haphazard or by mistake. It’s all according to the band’s framework. I don’t imagine Enter the Mirage will lack its moments of spontaneity or energy — it’s The Sonic Dawn‘s fourth record, and they’ve long-enough-since known what’s up in terms of their studio work — but the clarity of their intent is striking, even as the album’s title invokes visions of something not really there.

The Sonic Dawn‘s Emil Bureau also has a solo record coming out early next year, so keep an eye out for more on that, but here’s the info and preorder link for Enter the Mirage, courtesy, of course, of the PR wire:

the sonic dawn enter the mirage

Danish psych rockers THE SONIC DAWN unveil details for new album ‘Enter the Mirage’ on Heavy Psych Sounds; stream new single now!

Copenhagen’s psychedelic trio THE SONIC DAWN announce the release of their fourth studio album ‘Enter The Mirage’ this March 27th on Heavy Psych Sounds Records. The band share first groovy single “Young Love, Old Hate” today

“Young Love, Old Hate” is the opening track of THE SONIC DAWN’s new album ‘Enter The Mirage’. On this soulful and stirring single, they not only lead us through the darkness but also into the orange sunshine. It is a journey full of psychedelic mystery with a clear message: “Only love is true, don’t let hatred get the best of you”. “Enter The Mirage” is arguably the most blazing and powerful album yet by the Copenhagen trio. It has an unusual live feel for a studio album, packing much of the raw energy and electricity that has made their psychedelic shows famous in the rock underground.

Turn the volume up and experience “Young Love, Old Hate”

Frontman Emil Bureau explains about the album’s inception: “First I lost my father, then I lost my job and finally I lost my will to be a servant of anything that isn’t peace, love and freedom. It should be simple, but in this world it isn’t. Instead of getting back on the so-called career path, which is generally a dead end, I took a leap of faith, with the band’s support.”

‘Enter The Mirage’ overall theme is freedom, and visions that may seem too distant to be real, but only those who take the trip will ever really find out. Bureau spent half a year in a songwriting frenzy, spawning for The Sonic Dawn and also for his solo folk album (available soon on Heavy Psych Sounds). To give form to these song ideas, the band rented a space in the gloomiest part of Copenhagen, set up a studio there and rocked out for two months. The roughness of the place translates the determination from a tightly knit band. At the end of their long and laborious creative process, the band was completely broke. Fortunately, friend and former producer Thomas Vang (Roger Waters) allowed them to mix the album in The Village Recording at night, after his own sessions. Thanks to this and a skillful mastering by Hans Olsson Brookes (Graveyard), “Enter the Mirage” puts the high back in high fidelity.

THE SONIC DAWN New album ‘Enter The Mirage’
Out March 27th on Heavy Psych Sounds
Preorder now

TRACK LISTING
1. Young Love, Old Hate
2. Hits of Acid
3. Loose Ends
4. Children of the Night
5. Shape Shifter
6. Enter The Mirage
7. Soul Sacrifice
8. Join the Dead
9. Sun Drifter
10. UFO

THE SONIC DAWN is
Emil Bureau – Guitar, vocals
Jonas Waaben – Drums
Neil Bird – Bass

https://www.facebook.com/thesonicdawn/
https://thesonicdawn.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/thesonicdawn/
http://thesonicdawn.com/
http://www.heavypsychsounds.com
https://www.facebook.com/HEAVYPSYCHSOUNDS/

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Esbjerg Fuzztival 2020 Adds Sacri Monti, Dhidalah, Earth Tongue & Slowjoint

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 16th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

esbjerg fuzztival 2020 banner

The big name here is Sacri Monti, who move to the top billing of the poster for Esbjerg Fuzztival 2020 to rest alongside Vokonis. I don’t know if they’re headlining or what, but if they were, you’d have to believe it, as San Diego is a long plane ride from Denmark. I actually take this to mean the Cali heavy rockers will be back on tour in Europe in the Spring, which seems fair enough, so we’ll have to see where else their name pops up on festival bills and so on. Speaking of traveling significant distances, Slowjoint won’t, as they’re coming from the northern Danish peninsula Jutland, but Earth Tongue are coming all the way from New Zealand, which certainly qualifies, and the same applies to Dhidalah, from Japan.

Four bands, four different countries? Yeah, that kind of seems to be the story of Esbjerg Fuzztival 2020 through its first two lineup announcements. The first announcement had Hazemaze and Vokonis, who are both Swedish, but also Mexico’s Vinnum Sabbathi and Denmark’s own Vestjysk Ørken, who are also involved in organizing the fest, so it’s quite an international assemblage that’s coming together for the lineup. Especially for a festival that, while it’s two days, won’t be massive by the time it’s done if the one that took place earlier this year is anything to go by — that is, it’s not four days/three stages has some other events are, though I think there’s a pre-party, so that could technically be considered a third day if you wanted to push it — it shows an impressive commitment to geographic as well as sonic diversity. They make it easy to dig what they’re doing, and indeed I do.

Looking forward to seeing who else is involved once January comes around. That’s also when tickets go on sale, as they inform:

esbjerg fuzztival 2020 second announcement

Second Band Announcement!

Thrilled to add SACRI MONTI from the US to the 2020 line-up as well as Dhidalah from Japan, Earth Tongue from New Zealand and SLOWJOINT fra Jylland! The most ambitious line-up at Fuzztival yet, showcasing the many nuances of the “stoner”-genre. We can’t wait!

Tickets go on sale in January, where we’ll also reveal the next bands!

Huset Esbjerg
May 8+9 2020

https://www.facebook.com/events/2277251089027506/
https://www.facebook.com/esbjergfuzztival/
https://www.fuzztival.com/

Sacri Monti, Live at SonicBlast Moledo 2019

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Review & Video Premiere: Øresund Space Collective, Experiments in the Subconscious

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Reviews on December 5th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

oresund space collective experiments in the subconscious

[Click play above to watch Øresund Space Collective making Experiments in the Subconscious live in the studio. Album is out Jan. 2020 on Space Rock Productions. Cover art by Dennis W. Fleet.]

Though it’s not always immediately apparent by word or deed, one does believe in a bit of self-care every now and again, and in those instances where a bit of spiritual rejuvenation is needed, Øresund Space Collective stand ready to serve as a balm. Fortunately, they’re prolific. They begin 2020 with Experiments in the Subconscious — they’ve also posted countless live shows on the Internet Archive and made some available through Bandcamp, etc., as well — which is their 34th offering by their own count, and thereby collect five tracks, ranging from the three-and-a-half-minute kraut-synth apparent-accident “Oops” to the sprawling and perhaps titled-in-self-awareness jams “Lost in Africa” and “Prosthetic Cuban.” Those two lead off Experiments in the Subconscious and run back to back across 17 and 20 minutes, respectively, digging into Afrobeat and Latin progressions with a still thriving foundation in the space rock.

That, of course, is the well trod domain of the Øresund Space Collective, whose lineup is subject to change from outing to outing but here feature Scott “Dr. Space” Heller on synth as ever as well as Fender Rhodes/synthesist Magnus Hannibal (also Mantric Muse), guitarist/classical sitarist KG Westman (ex-Siena Root), drummer Tim Wallander (Agusa), violinist/guitarist Jonathan Segel (Camper Van Beethoven) and bassist Hasse Horrigmoe (Tangle Edge). It’s a not dissimilar group from that which appeared on late-2018’s virtual-reality trip Kybalion (review here), and as that album’s session took place in 2016, it’s hard to know just when Experiments in the Subsconscious might have been put to tape, but somehow, when it comes to Øresund Space Collective, time seems ever more to be an inapplicable construct. They exist. The album exists. Take heart. From the intertwining percussive shuffles and wah-sounding keyboards of “Lost in Africa” through the organic shredfest of guitar, keys, maybe-violin-run-through-effects that is centerpiece “Lost Milesage” (16:34) and post-“Oops” closer “Hieroglyphic Smell” (14:44), Øresund Space Collective bask in the natural process of creation itself, and whether it’s their most fervent moments of thrust or a moment of atmospheric breather-taking like the slowdown in the second half of “Prosthetic Cuban,” their most crucial hallmark is unmistakable.

Which is to say that, as ever, they live up to their long-established ethic of “totally improvised space rock.” Players go into the studio with nothing, and leave most likely exhausted with a collection of sessions from which the jams that comprise their albums are selected, mixed, mastered, and pressed. Studio tricks, overdubs, even vocals, need not apply, and their style is light on posturing or proselytizing. They’re not looking to harsh anyone’s mellow or bring down the room, they just want to go on adventures in aural subspace and have a good time getting there with instrumentalist conversation between players. It has certainly worked for them in the past and it does likewise here, and while one wouldn’t at all call the sheer sound of the band raw, what with the swirling effects on the guitars and synth and keys and whatever else — if there is sitar anywhere on Experiments in the Subconscious, it’s not as easy to discern as on 2017’s Hallucinations Inside the Oracle (review here) or either of Dr. Space‘s two full-lengths as part of the trio West, Space & Love — in terms of capturing the process of creation at the moment it happens, there are few as committed to bringing to life the realization of that rawest creative instant. The Big Bang of songwriting. That feeling when the piece seems to take hold and write itself and sometimes a band doesn’t even know how it came together later — it just did.

oresund space collective

Without hyper-romanticizing what they do, Øresund Space Collective seem to exist in a place searching for this moving target. It may be elusive, but they’ve got experience on their side at this point, and whoever comes in and out of the lineup for a given studio session or live show, the willingness of the participants to let go and bask in that moment feels essential to their taking part in the first place. That is, I guess by now those who sign up to work with Øresund Space Collective — one does imagine a players’ sign-up sheet with the band’s logo on top, though it’s unlikely such a thing exists — probably have some idea of what they’re getting into. Still, the sonic richness of Experiments in the Subconscious and the subtle and not-so-subtle variety between its component jams brings to the forefront some of the purposes and directions that moment of creation might take on as one instrument follows another along a given path or works an idea to its natural endpoint, or doesn’t, or maybe the whole thing just collapses on itself. You never really know, and that’s basically the fun of it.

Of course, it’s true that Experiments in the Subconscious probably wouldn’t exist if the jams didn’t ‘work’ at least to some degree. I’m sure there’s plenty of material from every Øresund Space Collective session that gets left out for one reason or another or doesn’t make the final edit from which their tracks emerge. And that’s fine. They’re certainly entitled to use the material they like best to make their albums — indeed that should be the ideal almost in every case — but though it’s the briefest of cuts, “Oops” is especially telling in conveying the “happy accident” sensibility that drives so much of what Øresund Space Collective do. It’s so short it’s barely a blip among the band’s oft-extended, fluid pieces, but its inclusion feels purposeful here in showcasing how something like that can just happen once someone is willing to make it do so. Even that seemingly simple act of plugging in, pressing (or clicking, more likely) record, and letting loose is a hurdle some people who want to never manage to overcome, and as it seems to happen so naturally for Øresund Space Collective, it’s all the better to hear them enjoying that spirit on a finished recording. It makes their work all the more inspiring, and Experiments in the Subconscious will no doubt prove to be exactly that for those open to it.

Øresund Space Collective on The Facebooks

Øresund Space Collective on Bandcamp

Øresund Space Collective website

Space Rock Productions website

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Esbjerg Fuzztival 2020 First Lineup Announcement: Vokonis, Vinnum Sabbathi, Hazemaze & Vestjysk Ørken Announced

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 26th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

esbjerg fuzztival 2020 banner

I’ve been through Denmark’s airport, so while my passport has the stamp — and the last time I was there, the guy at the customs counter had some very nice things to say about the photo from 2013 as relates to my current look; they almost always comment or at least give me a second look — I can’t really claim to have ever been there. If I was going to go, a smaller-ish festival like Esbjerg Fuzztival 2020 would be the reason why. The event, put together by members of Vestjysk Ørken, will feature not only that band for another go in its third incarnation, but also Vokonis and fellow Swedes Hazemaze as well as Mexico’s Vinnum Sabbathi, who one assumes will be announcing a European tour any minute now or at very least sometime in the next couple months — you know, before they fly over. That’s usually how these things work. But yeah, even from here I can feel this one being all about the vibe, being chill but heavy, and everyone there being laid back and having a good time.

2019 looked like an utter blast. I’d expect no different from 2020 once it’s finished being built up. Hell, this already looks like fun.

To wit:

esbjerg fuzztival 2020 first poster

ESBJERG FESTIVAL 2020 – FIRST BAND ANNOUNCEMENT!

We are very proud to present the first 4 bands on the poster for 2020!

VOKONIS will travel across the shallow waters from Sweden with a style that ranges from the heavy riffage and vocals of heavy bands such as Baroness to utterly clean Pink Floydish soundscapes, they aim to completely immerse you!

All The way from Mexico Vinnum Sabbathi merges heavy walls of sound with samples from science and sci-fi to create a unique sonic experience!

Also from Sweden Hazemaze will give you all the Sabbath riffs you could ever hope for and so much more! Today also marks their second full album release!

As per tradition (3 times IS a tradition!) we welcome back Vestjysk Ørken to open the festival for us on Friday!

https://www.facebook.com/events/2277251089027506/
https://www.facebook.com/esbjergfuzztival/
https://www.fuzztival.com/

Vestjysk Ørken, Live at Esbjerg Fuzztival 2019

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Friday Full-Length: Gas Giant, Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 22nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

A little bit more than halfway through the opening track on Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes is a kind of toss-off moment I’ve always found hilarious. The chorus of “Too Stoned,” which leads off the 2001 debut album from Copenhagen’s Gas Giant, is simple enough: “Too stoned/I’m too stoned/Too stoned again/Too stoned/Too stoned, baby/Too stoned again.” If nothing else, it gets the point across as vocalist Jesper Valentin delivers the lines atop a post-Monster Magnet space-psych-meets-heavy-rock swirl, honed by guitarist Stefan Krey and propelled by bassist Thomas Carstensen and drummer Pete Hell. But it also makes plain the ethic through which Gas Giant were working at the time. Though the definition of what the term meant was already expanding even then, it was stoner rock.

That expanding definition can be heard in Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes as well as concurrent offerings from further north in Europe like Dozer‘s In the Tail of a Comet, which came out the year before and arguably had an impact on the sound of “Super Sun Trigger” here — though of course the root influence is Kyuss either way — or Lowrider‘s Ode to Io, or even Colour Haze‘s Ewige Blumenkraft, the latter also from 2001, but it’s still there, and “Too Stoned” basically makes that inarguable at the record’s outset. From the rolling AcidKing-meets-slower-AtomicBitchwax nod of “Sit Down” and outright fuzz overload of “Down the Highway” early on to “Desert Call”‘s self-titled-era Queens of the Stone Age quirk and the odd reinvention of Rage Against the Machine‘s signature “Bulls on Parade” riff for the eight-minute album crescendo “Storm of My Enemies” ahead of one more bit of Wyndorfian good times in outer space on closer “Holy Walker,” Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes is a willfully bumpy ride, but it’s tied together through a spacious mix courtesy of the band and producer/engineer Ralph A. Rjeily (R.I.P. 2012), and the four-piece’s collective heart is never too far from the “rock” end of the equation. To say that it suits them throughout the nine-track/48-minute offering would be underselling it.

Whatever familiar elements went into the making of Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes — and there were plenty, as there were on a lot of records from the era when stoner rock was taking shape (1995-2002-ish) and as there are now more than a generation later — those shades of Nebula and Fu Manchu on “Down the Highway” and “All Creatures” came with more than just flashes of individualism gas giant pleasant journey in heavy tunesthat showed not just Gas Giant‘s real potential in moving forward from their roots, but also the foundation of songwriting that would let them do it. But though there are a lot of comparison-namedrops above, don’t take that to mean Gas Giant had nothing of their own to offer on their debut. In particular, the atmospheric flourish brought to the tracks via echoes and effects were pivotal in letting them establish an atmosphere beyond the sundry riffs and grooves on display, and though that’s something that would come more to fruition on 2003’s Mana, it’s there on Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes as well, and even 18 years later, its righteousness holds up. It’s there in the preach at the beginning of “All Creatures,” and in the low-end fuzz of “Desert Call” — the allure of those open spaces calling to northern Europe even long before Truckfighters would go cruising — and it’s there in the Stooges strum and strut of “Holy Walker” as the album rounds out. These sides come together to give Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes its personality, subtly varied as it is and almost deceptive in its complexity.

That is to say, in hindsight, it’s easy to stand back and pick out this or that genre element, because there’s been more than 15 years of genre built up since. At the time — not pre-internet, but well before the mobilization and full socialmediafication thereof — the context inherently would’ve been more modern, fresh and cutting edge. Think of all the “lost” records from the early part of the 1970s. Those heavy gems from ’71, ’72, of bands who put out one or two records and then disappeared, maybe with one person going off to do something else, maybe everybody just off to families, dayjobs or an eventual reunion. Gas Giant were similarly of their era and of the pastiche of sound that was happening at the time, but part of what stands them out even now is that they were doing it in Copenhagen.

Consider that Gas Giant‘s demo came out in 1999 after a 1998 EP released as Blind Man Buff and Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes came out in 2001. That’s the same year Baby Woodrose offered up their own first album, rising as they did from the proverbial ashes of On Trial. These were the roots of Copenhagen’s heavy scene, which continues to flourish today, and the almost tentative adventurousness shown in Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes and expanded on Mana continues to flourish in range of acts, whether it’s prog-fusion psychbringers Causa Sui, jammers like Papir or even a classic doom outfit like Demon Head. The point is that Denmark’s contributions to Europe’s greater heavy underground couldn’t have happened without bands like Gas Giant helping to pave the way. Whether you’re familiar with Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes or not — and they’re very much of that pre-Thee Facebooks lost era of heavy rock that I’ve spoken about on multiple occasions; swallowed into the vacuum that once was MySpace — I think that’s remarkable and worth highlighting.

Of course, I hope you agree.

Gas Giant had a split with WE also out in 2001, Mana in ’03 and a split with Colour Haze the year after that, but then that was it from them. The band went their separate ways and came back in 2015 to play Freak Valley Festival and more. They did those gigs and at some point last year made a page for Portals of Nothingness, a lost album from 1999, on Bandcamp that, as yet, has no audio on it, and not much has been heard from them since unless I’m missing something (always possible). One never knows what the future might hold, but Space Rock Productions reissued Pleasant Journey in Heavy Tunes in 2015 in three separate vinyl editions, so the record is out there for those who’d chase it down.

In any case, please enjoy it. Thanks for reading.

Let me tell you about the dinner I had last night.

We’re pretty deep into The Patient Mrs.’ semester at this point — just a couple weeks left before winter break — so I’m largely running point on dinners. I’m not much of a chef, so that kind of has come to involve cooking for the week, generally some variation on slow cooker chicken, vegetarian meat loaf, take out, etc. This week it’s been farm-raised chicken breast, thigh and wing meat that I cooked in the Crock Pot on Sunday. I seasoned it with paprika, garlic, onion powder, salt, pepper, chili powder, Italian-style this-and-that, and some Bell’s, because Bell’s. To go with it, I roasted three heads of cauliflower to a point of being well-done — not burnt, but not far off — and seasoned those similarly but with a little more chili powder to let them absorb a bit of depth. They came out nice.

All of this was tied together with a gigantic spaghetti squash — I mean huge; watermelon-sized — and a 20 oz. pack of Beyond Meat ground beef-style fake meat that I seasoned like hot Italian sausage, with fennel, garlic — always garlic — hot red pepper flakes, a cut whole chili, and so on, that I knew was going to be good because it took on a reddish tint when I was cooking it.

It all came together in our 12″ sauce pan with the high sides and was nearly overflowing when I added four containers of this pesto I drive half an hour to buy at the one fancy wine store down Rt. 24 that sells it. I buy in bulk. Mostly I also consume it in that fashion as well.

Top with fresh-grated parmesan. Dinner for the week.

Each evening I’d kind of add something different to it for myself — The Patient Mrs. is a little more orthodox, though I think if I’d shown up with ricotta or fresh mutz on any given night reheating, I’d only have been greeted as a liberator — and have it with a red bell pepper on the side. I’ve been obsessed with this garlic scape and hazelnut pesto that this one stand sells at the Denville Farmers Market on Sundays — what it lacks in being cheap it makes up for in owning my heart — so I’ve been adding that on top of everything else and very much enjoying it.

Last night was the final night of the run — Sunday to Thursday is pretty good; it was a very large spag squash — so I decided to go all out. I roasted three packs of pre-peeled garlic (maybe seven or eight cloves each?) in the oven and topped it with the pesto and had it with a pepper. It was decadent and marvelous. Everything was perfect. Maybe the best meal I’ve had in a year. And I recognize saying that about day-five leftovers is kind of wacky, but I tell you, this dinner was glorious. Most of the garlic simply melted but there was still some caramelized too, and the combination between that and the garlic scape and hazelnut pesto, the interaction there with that and the other pesto already in the root leftovers — holy shit. It was goddamned incredible.

I topped it off with a couple sugar-free Reese’s for dessert and went to bed fat and happy.

For all the issues I’ve had in my life and continue to have with food, every now and then it’s amazing to enjoy something like that.

Rough week, down week, another week full of days. Ended by getting dicked around on a track premiere. Low stakes bullshit. Doesn’t matter.

Next week, more days. Is one of them Thanksgiving? I think so. I’m doing a Scissorfight track premiere — for which I’ve been not at all dicked around — on Thanksgiving. Tune in to see if I can avoid saying I’m thankful they got back together.

Great and safe weekend. Have fun, eat a good meal, be kind. Make merry. Tomorrow we die.

FRM. Forum, Radio, Merch.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

The Obelisk merch

 

 

 

 

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Friday Full-Length: Dragontears, Turn on Tune in Fuck Off!

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

 

The cover art of Dragontears‘ third and final album, Turn on Tune in Fuck Off! (review here) — released in 2010 by Bad Afro Records — finds frontman and principle architect Uffe “Lorenzo Woodrose” Lorenzen standing maybe-naked among a trio of mostly-nude women clad in gasmasks and bulletbelts, their faces obscured save for their eyes but their automatic weapons very much in the foreground, aimed up at the downward-facing camera. Lorenzen, eyes obscured in sunglasses, his head tilted and mouth hanging slack, also looks up at the camera, and in each of his outstretched hands, there’s a bunch of pills, clearly being offered to whoever’s eye might’ve been caught by the striking, maddening pinks and blues surrounding. So is the title an invitation or a command? That exclamation point — encouraging or urging or demanding? Maybe pleading, even?

It’s hard to know listening to the record itself, the doomsday psychedelia of which pushed forward in concept and execution even from where Dragontears‘ two preceding LPs, 2007’s 2000 Micrograms from Home and 2008’s Tambourine Freak Machine saw it go. Lorenzen‘s main outfit, Baby Woodrose, for sure had its psychedelic aspects even back to its earliest, most garage-rocking days, but here again, Dragontears pursued another echelon of far out. And found it. Early on side A, “Two Tongue Talk” and the gleefully nihilistic “No Salvation” lead off with uptempo hooks and consummate swirl, engaging with a classic psych feel and prevalent depth of fuzz, while the three-and-a-half-minute “My Friend” marks a turning point to the next stage — or maybe “plane” is more appropriate, considering. The song itself doesn’t fill even that relatively brief runtime, instead drifting off into ethereal synth and keyboard dreaminess. But the real change is before that, as Lorenzen — perhaps in a foreshadow of the solo work he’s done in the last couple years — dons an acoustic guitar and the percussive push underlying “Two Tongue Talk” and “No Salvation” disappears in favor of a peaceful melodic wash. “Time of No Time” finds a middle ground between the two sides, lacing sitar alongside guitar and building on both the acid folk of the song before it and the more rocking feel of the two before that, all the while letting Lorenzen philosophize lyrically like the lysergic cult leader depicted on the front cover.

At just over six minutes, it’s the longest cut on the record to that point, but that doesn’t last, with the 13-minute drone-out “William” picking up in inner peace-inducing fashion, taking the catchiness that (re)emerged on “Time of No Time” and stretching it out across a vast drift with Lorenzen‘s vocals barely acting as a tether to the ground, molten as it is. I don’t know who William is or was, but the song that bears his name is long gone in a hand-percussed melodic expanse, intertwining lines of effects rising and fallingDragontears Turn On Tune In Fuck Off in the mix as Lorenzen does likewise, his lines somewhere between spoken hallucinogenic poetry and singing, dropping out before ceremonial-feeling bells jingle maybe to signal the close of mass or, maybe just to mourn for the planet, universe, self, whatever, all of it, who knows. On the vinyl edition of Turn on Tune in Fuck Off!, “William” and the subsequent “Mennesketvilling” (5:49) comprise the entirety of side B, and sure enough the one feeds right into the other, with the closer picking up from the drone and obscure sample playing and bringing some more forward layers of vocals forward in a chant that only seems to emphasize both the depth of the mix overall throughout the material and the obvious care that was put into the arrangement of elements therein. A freakout guitar solo takes hold and the sample returns, the song receding quickly into the fade before a final sweep seems to wipe everything out.

The title “Mennesketvilling” translates in a major internet company’s matrix from Danish to “dual man” in English, or “human gemini,” which is probably closer and still only barely getting at what the track is actually going for. Whether that’s supposed to just mean “twin” or be a statement on the duality of the human species, I can’t say and won’t waste time in speculating, but if it’s one last preach on the nature of mankind, it’s fairly enough earned and nothing if not welcome in rounding out the spirit of the proceedings.

Dragontears did play live around this time, with Lorenzen in the lineup that included Fuzz Daddy (aka Rocco Woodrose), Moody Guru (aka Riky Woodrose), Morton “Aron” Larsen and Henrik “The Hobbit” Klitstrøm alongside a purported host of others that presumably varied from show to show, but again, this was their final recording, with Lorenzen putting the project to rest with the intention to incorporate more of Dragontears‘ psychedelic aspects into Baby Woodrose. That’s a sonic progression that, in truth, had already been underway. The band’s 2009 self-titled had drawn in a fair share of the acidic, and it was hardly the first release to do so, but perhaps 2012’s Third Eye Surgery (review here) and 2016’s Freedom (review here) would follow this path even more. In 2013, Lorenzen and Klitstrøm and others whose history together stretched back to their days in underrated Danish psych rockers On Trial (if not longer) would reform Spids Nøgenhat for the Kommer Med Fred LP, but that seems to be the extent of that outfit’s work at least for the time being. One never knows, of course.

Over the years, Lorenzen has grown into a kind of Danish LSD-guru figure, and his solo output, released in his own name with Danish lyrics and titles, bears that out with a sensibility that seems to draw from some of what Dragontears were doing on Turn on Tune in Fuck Off!, particularly, as noted, on “My Friend” and maybe even “William.” While Lorenzen doesn’t quite try to get away permanently from the hooky songcraft that’s made Baby Woodrose‘s offerings stand up so well to the test of time, both 2017’s Galmandsværk (review here) and 2019’s Triprapport (review here) portray this identity in their visual and aural presentation, and with his beard long and gray and his material more otherworldly than it’s ever been, it suits him. I wouldn’t fight if another Baby Woodrose record was in the offing for 2020 or if Lorenzen were to continue the solo work or something else, since no matter where he goes, he seems to take such a strong presence with him. Sometimes, that’s a voice out in the void of space itself.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

I was gonna go see Monolord at Vitus Bar on Sunday. I didn’t go to Ode to Doom last week and I’m already hemming and hawing on this, despite my desire to catch Blackwater Holylight and Monolord in that space, let alone the matinee beforehand that I’m co-presenting. Feeling worn out, down, down, down, and like cooking dinner so there are leftovers for the week ahead is probably the way to go. There’s like a seven-pound spaghetti squash sitting on the counter that I should probably throw in the oven now so it’s done in time for Monday.

Shit is large.

The Pecan is up. Early. It’s almost 6:30AM now — not an overly productive morning on my part, but the Dragontears was fun to write about as Lorenzo Woodrose’s stuff usually is — and he’s been up for like an hour. Brutal. I thought he had pooped so I got him from upstairs, but no. He still found time to wind up his legs and kick me while I was changing his diaper though, and that’s what would seem to matter.

He’s two. It’s very hard. We were friends for a little bit there. Not this week.

I tell him, “You’re in control of your responses.” “We can put on shoes easy or hard, it’s up to you.” Even if he doesn’t really know what I’m talking about in terms of actualization of self, I figure that’s good habit for me to say rather than, “Put on your fucking shoes you wretched thing-beast,” and good for him to hear from what’s basically the outset of him understanding words. There’s one corner of the room I don’t want him to go in. Every time I’m out of his line of sight, he’s there. By Wednesday, I felt like my brain was going to explode. Yesterday, which was Thursday, The Patient Mrs. worked from 7AM-6PM (oh, that easy college professor’s schedule; when you’re 80, maybe) and I had him all day and it was too cold to play outside. He bit, he hit, he kicked, he hugged, he pretended to sneeze and laughed, he ran, he ate a good lunch. We went grocery shopping and he sat in the cart. He went in that same fucking corner and I told him, “Okay, that’s cool, you hang out in there and I’ll just put away your toys since you’re not using them anymore. This puzzle looks fun, but if you don’t need it, I’ll put it away,” and he came out of the corner to play with the puzzle. Even if he doesn’t know all the words — and he might — he got the idea, and it was a solid hour before he was back over there playing with the power bar, which at that point was a win.

It was a day, in other words.

So, next week. It’s full. There’s a ton of shit, whether or not I go see Monolord, and if I’m saying that on Friday, I’m probably not going. We’ll see. But it’s a full week regardless, highlighted by a Solace track premiere rescheduled from this week and a War Cloud video premiere, the latter of which will be on Friday to round things out. I’ll review Vessel of Light in there too somewhere.

I’m sure you’re riveted.

Stay glued to your seat, computer, phone, whatever. More Obelisk coming soon.

Ugh.

Everyone have a great and safe weekend. Please be kind and have fun. You can do both.

FRM. Forum, radio, merch.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

The Obelisk merch

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Uffe Lorenzen Releases Roky Erickson Tribute Cover “If You Have Ghosts”

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 14th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

You’re not going to hear a more appropriate cover this year than Uffe Lorenzen taking on Roky Erickson, I’m sorry. It is a fitting homage from the Baby Woodrose frontman to the 13th Floor Elevators frontman to record “If You Have Ghosts” and issue it as a name-your-price single, and as one would have to expect given the depth of influence Erickson has had on the Copenhagen-based Lorenzen‘s work in various outfits over the last two decades-plus, the song is duly nailed and the spirit of homage in which it’s performed can be heard in the raw simplicity of the recording, done live on a musty guitar with one-take vocals on an 8-track recorder. Can’t ask for much more than that.

Since the start of last month, Lorenzen has been embroiled in a series of live shows that continue this week and into November as he supports his 2019 sophomore solo outing, Triprapport (review here), on Bad Afro Records. You’ll find the remaining dates below, as well as background on this cover, and of course the stream/links, courtesy of the PR wire:

uffe lorenzen if you have ghosts

Uffe Lorenzen – If You Have Ghosts

13th Floor Elevators and Roky Erickson have always been a big inspiration for Uffe Lorenzen and all the bands he has been involved in. Be it Baby Woodrose, Spids Nøgenhat, Dragontears or On Trial. So when Roky died back in May 2019 Uffe Lorenzen decided to pay homage to the legendary psych rocker and record one of his songs.

Uffe Lorenzen was looking for a simple, stripped down and naked sound and found a perfect match in an old Brenell 8-track tape machine from the 70s to record If You Have Ghosts on. To obtain a real dry sound he played on an old guitar from the 70s that had been found in a barn. The guitar strings had not been changed for 10 years which gave everything a special feel.

The recording was done with no editing and the vocal part was recorded in one take. Thanks to tape operator and producer Palle Demant the result is quite breathtaking and unique. Hopefully Roky Erickson will be listening upstairs with a smile on his face.

MP3:
http://badafro.dk/uffe-lorenzen-if-you-have-ghosts-mp3
Spotify, Apple etc.
https://BadAfro.lnk.to/UffeLorenzen-Ghosts

Uffe Lorenzen live:
17.10 Radar Aarhus
20.10 Hotel Cecil København (sold out)
25.10 KulturCosmos Viby Sjaelland
26.10 Harder Svendborg
27.10 Hotel Cecil København
31.10 Boxer Trondheim
01.11 Blå Rock Tromsø

Uffe’s latest album triprapport can still be streaming, downloaded and purchased from these links:

Digital: https://badafro.lnk.to/UffeLorenzen-Album
Bandcamp: https://badafrorecords.bandcamp.com/album/triprapport

https://www.facebook.com/lorenzowoodrose
https://www.instagram.com/themanwhoatetheplant
https://www.facebook.com/BabyWoodrose/
https://www.facebook.com/badafrorecords/
https://badafrorecords.bandcamp.com/
http://badafro.dk/

Uffe Lorenzen, “If You Have Ghosts”

Uffe Lorenzen, Triprapport (2019)

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Pinemoon Release “Miracle” Single & Video; Album Coming Soon

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 10th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

This one’s all about vibe. Danish melancholic post-rockers Pinemoon are getting ready to release their debut album, yet-untitled, sometime this Fall through Pinhead Music. “Miracle” is the second single taken from the impending LP behind “Sinister,” which came out back in May. I’ll admit the new track is my first time hearing the band — I’ve never been on the ground floor of anything — but the moody sensibility of “Miracle” is pretty dead-on in terms of what it seems like the band is looking to capture, which they absolutely nail when they liken it to Twin Peaks. The video below has that spirit as well, and while I obviously don’t know how it might speak to the record as a whole, sometimes a little shoegaze is just the thing and this one is hitting the spot.

Announcement, links and video follow, as per the PR wire:

pinemoon miracle

Earlier this year Pinemoon released their first single, Sinister, from their coming debut album. Now they are ready with their second singe, Miracle, witch draws on references like Slowdive and The War on Drugs while creating a melancholic and nostalgic feeling, known from the cult series Twin Peaks.

The melancholy flows in the melodic and evocative shoegaze that Copenhagen based Pinemoon brings on their debut album, that will be released in 2019 on the Danish record label Pinhead Music. Pinemoon draws on the energy of indie rock and good melodies, and are not afraid of letting the songs take their time to develop into dreamy arrangements that bring Slowdive, Pale Saints and even the cult series of David Lynch, Twin Peaks, to mind. In spite of mentioned references, Pinemoon still manages to find their very own and unique sound.

On Friday the 30th of August the single, Miracle, will be released. Just like the rest of the coming debut album, Miracle is recorded live on tape and mixed analog, which gives a warm, nostalgic sound and ensures that the music will emerge real and tastefully stylish.

Miracle leaves a musical taste of the melancholy and the consistent theme of the album. A theme dwelling on the experience of a worldview falling apart; is the time of the miracles really over? Miracle is released with a video on the 30th of August 2019.
The debut album will be out in the fall of 2019.

Pinemoon is:
Christoffer Schultz: vokal og guitar
Steven Stern Stewart: Bas og vokal

http://www.facebook.com/pinemoon.dk
https://pinemoondk.bandcamp.com/
http://www.pinemoon.dk/

Pinemoon, “Miracle” official video

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