Live Review: Geezer and Curse the Son in Connecticut, 09.18.15

Posted in Reviews on September 21st, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

Curse the Son (Photo by JJ Koczan)

I was late getting to The Outer Space, sort of co-located with the Hamden Ballroom in Hamden, Connecticut, which is tucked far enough off the beaten path to seem at night to be out of purview of Yale University in nearby New Haven, but probably isn’t by day. The parking lot looked to be shared with a couple commercial or light industrial concerns, but being slightly down a hill gave it a tucked-away sensibility, and the high quality of the venue itself played into a well-kept-secret vibe. A separate bar up front and the venue proper in back with a large stage, high ceiling, pro sound, pro lights, it had a spacious feel, but wasn’t by any means empty.

American Burn (Photo by JJ Koczan)I’d missed Wasted Theory, the Delaware-based Southern heavy rockers who’d played just a couple weeks ago at Vultures of Volume II in MD (review here). They’d had to go on first because, much like myself, New Hampshire’s American Burn had hit traffic coming south for the show, so it was American Burn wrapping up when I got there. From what I caught, the five-piece’s burly, Down-influenced heavy riffing seemed intact from when I caught them opening for Gozu in May (review here) — I also noted that vocalist Lee had a Gozu shirt on he acquired at that same gig, sans its original sleeves — and though I only saw a little bit of it, they seemed to get a good response from the crowd as well.

New York trio Geezer were on next, out on a weekender alongside Wasted Theory that would take them the next night to Allston, Massachusetts, where they’d meet up with Kind and Mos Generator, the latter fresh off their run with The Atomic Bitchwax. The heavy blues specialists were down drummer Chris Turco and had Charles Ruggiero filling Geezer (Photo by JJ Koczan)in alongside bassist Richie Touseull and guitarist/vocalist Pat Harrington, seeming a natural fit in the group for having been a former bandmate of Harrington‘s in aughts hard rockers Slunt. This also marked my first time seeing Geezer since Touseull stepped in on bass, and fittingly, they opened with “Long Dull Knife,” the May 2015 single that was their first studio outing with him in the band.

Harrington‘s slide ever at the ready, it was impossible not to notice how molten Geezer‘s blues has become and how, without directly invoking psychedelia, the Kingston, NY, outfit have managed to bring about a laid back, earthy, jammy vibe. Liquid fuzz. I’ve been fortunate enough to see Geezer a handful of times by now, and even without Turco‘s drums, the progression they’ve made in presence and sound was evident, Harrington in an “STB Family” shirt as a finger-plucking blues frontman, his gravelly voice calling out the changes on stage and turning to the mic to inform the crowd that they’d indeed hit into the “Full Tilt Boogie.” And so they have.

Just last week, Geezer announced they’d inked a deal with the Paris-based bookers Total Volume, signaling clearly an intent to tour Europe, and watching them roll through “Ancient Song” and “Ghost Rider Solar Plexus,” both highlights of their 2014 STB Records full-length, Gage (review here), they looked and sounded ready for export, and while Ruggiero was just sitting in, he brought aGeezer (Photo by JJ Koczan) sense of tension to the drums that fit well. Clearly the right person for the job, even if it’s a temp job. They finished with another jam-heavy groover (maybe new?) that was right on to the point where I didn’t even miss “Pony,” and were suitably lauded for their efforts. Because their material is so easy-rolling, it’s easy to lose sight of just how quickly they’ve come so far, but Geezer have worked deceptively fast, and so in addition to having an eye out for EU dates, I’m keeping my fingers crossed for a new album in 2016.

Homegrown riffers Curse the Son had been pushing for a release even earlier than that, but I’ve no specifics to report on when or how their follow-up to 2012’s Psychache (review here) might arrive. They’re due, though, and seeing them for the first time in more than a year — actually, last I caught both Geezer and Curse the Son individually, they were also sharing a bill, at The Eye of the Stoned Goat IV in Worcester, MA (review here); funny how that works — was all the more intriguing because, like Geezer, the Hamden-based band have also swapped out bassists, Curse the Son (Photo by JJ Koczan)with Brendan Keefe taking the role formerly occupied by Richard “Cheech” Weeden. Much to my delight, they also had new material to share.

I was enough of a fan of Psychache‘s plus-sized fuzz riffing and spacious vibes to be palpably stoked when STB picked it up for a giving-it-its-due vinyl release (review here) last year, but I’ve been looking forward to new Curse the Son for a while, so a live taste was welcome. There were two new songs played and neither had a final title, but both took some of the roll-happy spirit of the last album and seemed to build on it with more of a sense of bounce and chug. Having Keefe wielding his low-slung bass in the band also signaled a clear change in dynamic because he had a microphone in front of him and added his backing vocals to bechapeaued guitarist Ron Vanacore‘s own (and while I’m making a theme out of frontman t-shirt choices, Vanacore had the Iommi-as-god shirt, which seems about right), giving Curse the Son‘s live performance something it didn’t previously have, but that at the same time was truer to the layering on Psychache and presumably the next record as well.

Case in point, “Spider Stole the Weed.” First, if there was any doubt Curse the Son were the hometown act, it was cast aside quickly by the audience’s familiarity with the track. Second, Vanacore got a good laugh afterward when he told the true story on which the song was based — there was a spider, it stole the weed. Third, having Keefe‘s vocals added only highlighted the hook even further on stage, and it made me hope they’ve continued to explore the two-singer approach in the studio, at least on some cursory level. Not that he and Vanacore Curse the Son (Photo by JJ Koczan)need to be harmonizing necessarily — though they came close once or twice — but just continuing to refine their sound and make it a richer listening experience on the whole. Weedian Psychache opener “Goodbye Henry Anslinger” was similarly enhanced.

They had another, quicker new one worked in, drummer Michael Petrucci (also Lord Fowl, etc.) adding snare flourish during the builds and finding tension in each fill, and closed out with “Pulsotar Bringer” from 2011’s debut LP, Klonopain (review here), the full-on nod brought to its natural boiling point, and the point underscored that, like GeezerCurse the Son have taken significant steps forward since their first album. As they move ahead with the lineup of VanacorePetrucci and Keefe, I’ll still look forward to what comes next, whenever it happens to show up, be it in 2015 or the New Year.

More pics after the jump. Thanks for reading.

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The Mountain Movers Premiere “I Watch the Sea” from New Album Death Magic

Posted in audiObelisk on August 25th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

the mountain movers

This past weekend, New Haven, Connecticut, pastoralists The Mountain Movers played the release show for their second album, Death Magic. Out this Friday, Aug. 28, through Safety Meeting Records, it’s their fifth long-player and first since 2010’s Apple Mountain, recorded by former drummer John Miller (Titles) and boasting a natural and subtly driving sound. Shoegazing and indie airiness pervade, and there’s a weighted undertone in Ross Menze‘s drums and the bass of Rick Omonte (ex-Crooked Hook) that meshes smoothly with guitarists Dan Greene (also vocals and artwork) and Kryssi Battalene (lead) to present an organic, at times understated psychedelia. Less space, more earth, but trippy all the same.

Opener “Short Life” does very little to hide its ’90s stylization, but by the time The Mountain Movers make their way to “Floating Holiday” two tracks later, the context has already widened considerably. It continues to do so throughout Death Magic, which builds tension and releases it in periodic bouts of fuzz and post-rocking dreaminess. “Dead the mountain movers death magicTomorrow” turns its title into a morose hook and seems to presage the immersive, slow-rolling swing of “Stray Cat in the Street,” which seems to be over before its really started at 2:20. Tempo and runtime seem to be playthings as much as the instruments on Death Magic, but the album lacks nothing for flow, pushing through the more jagged riffing of “I’ve Been Moved” and its near-seven-minute psychedelic thrust into the more peaceful but still discordant plod of closer “A Bird Flew in My Shed” in a manner suited to the vibe-intensive experience throughout.

At the center of Death Magic, one finds the seemingly companion “Nightsong of the Sea” and “I Watch the Sea.” The former lulls the listener to into a sort of semi-consciousness with its blissed-out lo-fi, but when it comes around, “I Watch the Sea” is immediately more abrasive, incorporating feedback Sonic Youth-style for purposeful abrasion even before it moves into its section of full-on jamming. Its six and a half minutes are among the rougher-edged on the album as a whole, but The Mountain Movers prove more than able to contain the fire they light, turning around in the last 30 seconds of the track in order to shift back to the chorus, like it ain’t no thing.

But it is, and you can find out for yourself by listening to the track on the player below, courtesy of Safety Meeting, which again, has the album out this Friday, Aug. 28. More info on the record follows the stream.


Although five years have passed since Apple Mountain, the Mountain Movers’ last full length album, the band has been working steadily, releasing a half dozen 7” EP’s and cassettes. Over the last couple years their line-up has stabilized, one of incredible chemistry, and with every live performance the band’s interpretations of Dan Greene’s song writing have become increasingly direct, focused, and tonally powerful. The result is the highly anticipated new full-length album, Death Magic.

Many bands described as “lo-fi” only begin that way, and as the artist improves, so does the level of fidelity. But the Mountain Movers have upended the usual trajectory. After their ambitious and incredibly realized album Let’s Open Up The Chest (2008), a hi-fidelity studio production, subsequent releases were grounds for experimentation and home recording, resulting in a sound that some might call lo-fi. For the Mountain Movers, this experimentation was a quest for an elusive tone, a far-off texture, and anyone who has seen their live shows over the last few years has witnessed the Mountain Movers distill their formula into something organic, pure, and unmasked. To make this album, the band set up in the modest basement studio of former member John Miller, whose production is live, transparent, and captures the feeling of what may be Greene’s best song writing to date. Death Magic is not another over-produced, ultra-digital pile of overdubs and effects. Rather, these ten tracks document an inspired, unified performance—fuzzed out, pounding, and hypnotic.

The Mountain Movers Tumblr

The Mountain Movers on Thee Facebooks

Preorder at Safety Meeting Records

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Bedroom Rehab Corporation Premiere Video for “When all You’ve Got is a Hammer”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 28th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

bedroom rehab corporation

It will not take too long into the seven minutes of “When all You’ve Got is a Hammer” before the progress in Bedroom Rehab Corporation‘s style, songwriting and performance shows itself. The Connecticut two-piece were last heard from on their 2013 debut long-player, Red over Red (review here), and having seen them only get better on stage over numerous shows the last two years or so, I’ve been somewhat anxious to get my ears on some new audio, to see if they’d be able to translate their development into a studio setting. Recorded by Justin Pizzoferrato (Elder, Black Pyramid) and finished in the cold winter hours of early 2015, the new Fortunate Some EP will be released Oct. 3 (preorders are available as of this premiere) and if “When all You’ve Got is a Hammer” is anything to go by, it will find them doing precisely that: bringing the tight heaviness and aggression of their stage show to completed studio tracks.

Bassist/vocalist Adam Wujtewicz and drummer Meghan Killimade are each well in command of their modus throughoutbedroom rehab corporation fortunate some the song’s semi-extended course. The verses showcase an increased capacity for melody and the chorus is more aggro, but still catchy in its shout and stomp. As the first audio to be made public from Fortunate Some it bodes well in its captured energy and also its spaciousness, the middle of “When all You’ve Got is a Hammer” moving into an effects-laden instrumental section so fluidly you almost don’t know until you’re already in it working your way back, but of course they slam through with full tonal and percussive brunt to finish out. Directed by Peter Huoppi, the video takes the titular imagery head on. We see a blacksmith and a guy hammering rocks toward some unknown end out in the woods — that’s a job, right? — and both come to discard their hammers and hit the bar where Killimade and Wujtewicz happen to be playing. Somehow at the end, after a trek through the same rocky woods and what looks like the train tracks by Cherry St. Station in Wallingford, CT (actually they’re in Norwich, about an hour’s can’t-get-there-from-here New England drive away), the duo pick up both castaway hammers and make their way down the line.

There’s a lot to enjoy here for those who heard Red over Red, but even if “When all You’ve Got is a Hammer” is your introduction to Bedroom Rehab Corporation, it’s a good time to be introduced, as they’ve just brought their approach to an entirely new level to emerge as a more confident, sonically powerful band.

Video and info follow. Please enjoy:

Bedroom Rehab Corporation, “When all You’ve Got is a Hammer” official video

Bedroom Rehab Corporation – “When All You’ve Got is a Hammer” from the new EP ‘Fortunate Some’ available on LP/Digital October 3, 2015.

Pre-order ‘Fortunate Some’ from BandCamp (you will receive immediate download of “When All You’ve Got is a Hammer”):

Director: Peter Huoppi
Featuring: Chris Holdridge, Clint Wright & Rich Huoppi
Live footage filmed on location at 33 Golden Street, New London, CT

Featured in live footage:
Marko Fontaine, Stephanie Johnson, Pete Egner, Ben LaRose, Bobby Crash, Tim “Grim” Riley, Suz Manning, Corina Malbaurn, Kim Zajehowski Case, Tracy Tremblay, Paul Brockett, Tracey Hollins, Sean Beirne, Greg Gates, Jim Villano, Courtney Cole, Jerrica Cole

Bedroom Rehab Corporation on Thee Facebooks

Preorder Fortunate Some on Bandcamp

Bedroom Rehab Corporation on Twitter

Bedroom Rehab Corporation on Instagram

Release Show Info

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Quarterly Review: Lucifer, Rosetta, Mantar, King Giant, Si Ombrellone, Grand Massive, Carlton Melton Meets Dr. Space, Shiggajon, Mount Hush, Labasheeda

Posted in Reviews on July 3rd, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

the obelisk summer quarterly review

The final day of the Quarterly Review is upon us. It has been one hell of a week, I don’t mind saying, but good and productive overall, if in a kind of cruel way. I hope that you’ve been able to find something in sifting through all these releases that you really dig. I have, for whatever that’s worth. Before we dig into the last batch, I just want to thank you for checking in and reading this week. If you’ve seen all five of these or if this is the first bunch you’ve come across, that you’re here at all is appreciated immensely.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

Lucifer, Lucifer I

lucifer lucifer i

Vocalist Johanna Sadonis, who burst into the international underground consciousness last year with The Oath, resurfaces following that band’s quick dissolution alongside former Cathedral guitarist and riffer-of-legend Gary “Gaz” Jennings in Lucifer, whose Lucifer I eight-song debut LP is released on Rise Above Records. Joined by bassist Dino Gollnick and drummer Andrew Prestidge, Sadonis and Jennings wind through varied but thoroughly doomed atmospheres across songs like opener “Abracadabra” – the outright silliness of the “magic word” kind of undercutting the cultish impression for which Lucifer are shooting – or early highlights “Purple Pyramid” and “Izrael.” A strong side A rounding out with “Sabbath,” Lucifer I can feel somewhat frontloaded, but on repeat listens, the layered chorus of “White Mountain,” “Morning Star”’s late-arriving chug, the classically echoing “Total Eclipse” and the atmospheric finish of “A Grave for Each One of Us” hold their own. After a strong showing from Lucifer’s debut single, the album doesn’t seem like it will do anything to stop the band’s already-in-progress ascent. Their real test will be in the live arena, but they sustain a thematic ambience across Lucifer I’s 44 minutes, and stand ready to follow Rise Above labelmates Ghost and Uncle Acid toward the forefront of modern doom.

Lucifer on Thee Facebooks

Rise Above Records

Rosetta, Quintessential Ephemera

rosetta quintessential ephemera

Drone-prone Philadelphia post-metallers Rosetta return with Quintessential Ephemera, the follow-up to 2013’s The Anaesthete and their fifth LP overall, which resounds in its ambience as a reinforcement of how little the band – now a five-piece with the inclusion of guitarist Eric Jernigan – need any hype or genre-push to sustain them. Through a titled intro, “After the Funeral,” through seven untitled tracks of varying oppressiveness and rounding out with the unabashedly pretty instrumental “Nothing in the Guise of Something,” they continue to plug away at their heady approach, relentless in their progression and answering the darker turns of their prior outing with a shift toward a more colorful atmosphere. At 52 minutes, Quintessential Ephemera isn’t a slight undertaking, but if you were expecting one you probably haven’t been paying attention to the last decade of Rosetta’s output. As ever, they are cerebral and contemplative while staying loyal to the need for an emotional crux behind what they do, and the album is both dutiful and forward-looking.

Rosetta on Thee Facebooks

Rosetta on Bandcamp

Golden Antenna Records

War Crime Recordings

Mantar, Death by Burning

mantar death by burning

Pressed up by Brutal Panda Records for Stateside issue following a 2014 release in Europe on Svart, Death by Burning is the debut full-length from sans-bass Hamburg duo Mantar – vocalist/guitarist Hanno, drummer/vocalist Erinc – and as much as it pummels and writhes across its thrash-prone 10 tracks, opener “Spit” setting a tone for the delivery throughout, there are flourishes of both character and groove to go with all the bludgeoning throughout standout cuts like “Cult Witness,” “The Huntsmen,” the explosive “White Nights,” “The Stoning” and the more lumbering instrumental closer “March of the Crows,” the two-piece seamlessly drawing together elements of doom, thrash and blackened rock and roll into a seething, tense concoction that’s tonally weighted enough to make one’s ears think they’re hearing bass strings alongside the guitar, but still overarchingly raw in a manner denoting some punk influence. Bonus points for the Tom G. Warrior-style “ough!” grunts that make their way into “The Stoning” and the rolling nod of “Astral Kannibal.” Nasty as hell, but more subtle than one might expect.

Mantar on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records

Brutal Panda Records

King Giant, Black Ocean Waves

king giant black ocean waves

Though it seems King Giant’s fate to be persistently underrated, the Virginian dual-guitar five-piece offer their most stylistically complex material to date on their third full-length, Black Ocean Waves (released on The Path Less Traveled Records and Graveyard Hill), recorded by J. Robbins (Clutch, Murder by Death, etc.) as the follow-up to 2012’s Dismal Hollow (streamed here). Still commanded by the vocal presence of frontman Dave Hammerly, the album also finds moments of flourish in the guitars of David Kowalski and Todd “T.I.” Ingram on opener “Mal de Mer,” the leads on “Requiem for a Drunkard” or the intro to extended finishing move “There Were Bells,” bassist Floyd Lee Walters III and drummer Keith Brooks holding down solid rhythms beneath the steady chug of “The One that God Forgot to Save” and “Blood of the Lamb.” Side A closer “Red Skies” might be where it all ties together most, but the full course of Black Ocean Waves’ eight tracks provides a satisfying reminder of the strength in King Giant’s craftsmanship.

King Giant on Thee Facebooks

The Path Less Traveled Records on Thee Facebooks

Si Ombrellone, Horns on the Same Goat

si ombrellone horns on the same goat

The 14 single-word-title tracks of Si Ombrellone’s Horns on the Same Goat were originally recorded in 2006, but for a 2015 release, Connecticut-based multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Simon Tuozzoli (Vestal Claret, King of Salem) took them back into his own UP Recording Studio for touch-ups and remastering. The endeavor is a solo outing for Tuozzoli, styled in a kind of post-grunge rock with Frank Picarazzi playing drums to give a full-band feel, and finds catchy, poppy songwriting coming forward in the layered vocals of “Innocence,” while later, “Forgiveness” and “Darkness” offset each other more in theme than sound, as “Love” and “Hate” had done earlier, the album sticking to its straightforward structures through to six-minute closer “Undone,” which boasts a more atmospheric take. It’s an ambitious project to collect 14 sometimes disparate emotional themes onto a single outing, never mind to do it (mostly) alone – one might write an entire record about “Trust,” say, or “Rage,” which opens – but Tuozzoli matches his craftsmanship with a sincerity that carries through each of these tracks.

Si Ombrellone on Thee Facebooks

Si Ombrellone album downloads

Grand Massive, 2

grand massive 2

Boasting a close relationship to Duster69 and Mother Misery and featuring in their ranks Daredevil Records owner Jochen Böllath, who plays guitar, German heavy rockers Grand Massive revel in commercial-grade Euro-style tonal heft bordering on metallic aggression. 2 is their aptly-titled second EP (on Daredevil) and it finds Böllath, lead guitarist Peter Wisenbacher, vocalist Alex Andronikos, bassist Toby Brandl and drummer Holger Stich running through six crisply-executed tracks of catchy, fist-pumping riffy drive, slowing a bit for the creepy ambience of the interlude “Woods” or the more lurching tension of “I am Atlas,” but most at home in the push of “Backseat Devil” and closer “My Own Sickness,” a mid-paced groove adding to the festival-ready weight Grand Massive conjure. Word is they’re already at work on a follow-up. Fair enough, but 2 has plenty to offer in the meantime in its tight presentation and darker vibes, Grand Massive having been through a wringer of lineup changes and emerged with their songwriting well intact.

Grand Massive on Thee Facebooks

Daredevil Records

Carlton Melton Meets Dr. Space, Live from Roadburn 2014


If you guessed “spacey as hell” as regards this meeting between NorCal psych explorers Carlton Melton and Scott “Dr. Space” Heller of Danish jammers Øresund Space Collective, go ahead and give yourself the prize. Limited to 300 copies worldwide courtesy of Lay Bare Recordings and Space Rock Productions, Carlton Melton Meets Dr. Space’s Live from Roadburn 2014 is a consuming, near-100-minute unfolding, Heller joining Carlton Melton on stage for four of the total seven inclusions, adding his synthesized swirl to the swirling wash, already by then 26 minutes deep after the opening “Country Ways > Spiderwebs” establishes a heady sprawl that only continues to spread farther and farther as pieces unfold, making “Out to Sea” seem an even more appropriate title. It will simply be too much for some, but as somebody who stood and heard the sounds oozing from the stage at Cul de Sac in Tilburg, the Netherlands, as part of the Roadburn 2014 Afterburner event, I can say it was a special trip to behold. It remains so here.

Carlton Melton’s website

Øresund Space Collective on Thee Facebooks

Lay Bare Recordings

Shiggajon, Sela

shiggajon sela

According to El Paraiso Records, Sela was held up as so many releases have been owing to plant production having been overwhelmed by Record Store Day and will be out circa August. Fair enough. Consider this advance warning of Danish improve collective Shiggajon’s first outing for the Causa Sui-helmed imprint, then, and don’t be intimidated as we get closer to the release and people start talking about things like “free jazz” and dropping references to this or that Coltrane. The real deal with Shiggajon – central figures Mikkel Reher-Lanberg (percussion, drums, clarinet) and Nikolai Brix Vartenberg (sax) here joined by Emil Rothenborg (violin, double bass), Martin Aagaard Jensen (drums), Mikkel Elzer (drums, percussion, guitar), Sarah Lorraine Hepburn (vocals, flute, electronics, tingshaws) – is immersive and tipped over into music as the ritual itself. One might take on the two 18-minute halves of Sela with a similarly open mind as when approaching Montibus Communitas and be thrilled at the places the album carries you. I hope to have more to come, but again, heads up – this one is something special.

Shiggajon’s Blogspot

El Paraiso Records

Mount Hush, Low and Behold!

mount hush low and behold

“The Spell” proves right away that Alps-based heavy rockers Mount Hush (I love that they don’t specify a country) have the post-Queens of the Stone Age fuzz-thrust down pat on their debut EP Low and Behold, but the band also bring an element of heavy psychedelia to their guitar work and the vocals – forward in the mix – have a bluesier but not caricature-dudely edge, so even as they bounce through the “Come on pretty baby” hook of “The Spell,” they’re crafting their own sound. The subsequent “King Beyond” showcases how to have a Graveyard influence without simply pretending to sound like Graveyard, even going so far as to repurpose a classic rock reference – “Strange Days” by The Doors – in its pursuit, and the seven-minute “The Day She Stole the Sun” stretches out for a more psychedelic build. Most exciting of all on a conceptual level is closer “Levitations.” Drumless, it sets ethereal vocals and samples over a tonal swirl and airy, quieter strumming. Hardly adrenaline-soaked and not intended to be, but it shows Mount Hush have a genuine will to experiment, and it’s one I hope they continue to develop.

Mount Hush on Thee Facebooks

Mount Hush on Bandcamp

Labasheeda, Changing Lights

labasheeda changing lights

Joined for the first time by drummer Bas Snabilie (apparently since replaced by Aletta Verwoerd) Amsterdam heavy art rockers Labasheeda mark four full-length releases with Changing Lights on Presto Chango, the violin/viola of vocalist/guitarist Saskia van der Giessen and guitar/bass/keyboard of Arne Wolfswinkel carrying across an open but humble atmosphere, touching here on Sonic Youth’s dare-to-have-a-verse moments in “My Instincts” and pushing into more blown-out jarring with the slide-happy “Tightrope.” They bring indie edge to a cover of The Who’s “Circles,” and round out with a closing duo of the album’s only two tracks over five minutes, “Cold Water” and “Into the Wide,” van der Giessen’s croon carrying a sweetness into the second half of the former as the latter finishes Changing Lights with a rolling contrast of distortion and strings as engrossing as it is strange. Labasheeda will go right over a lot of heads, but approached with an open mind it can just as easily prove a treasure for its blatant refusal to be pinned to one style or another.

Labasheeda on Thee Facebooks

Labasheeda on Bandcamp


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NightBitch Post New Video for “Caged Heat” (NSFW)

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 1st, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster


Everybody’s gotta have a specialty, and Connecticut four-piece NightBitch take exploitation-worship to the level of artistry. Their new, self-titled EP is out now via The Ajna Offensive/Doomentia Records, and as all their work has to date, it revels in classic heavy metal. And lady-parts. You get a lot of both, and if the moniker didn’t already tell you, NightBitch aren’t really shooting for subtlety. Even so, the organ horrors and infectious riffing of “Caged Heat” stand out even without the copious ’70s boobage in the video, which pulls clips from the 1971 movie, Women in Cages, and the song is almost troublingly catchy.

But sleaze is NightBitch‘s business, and business is good. From what I hear, the vinyl version of the EP is moving quick and they’re heading out later this summer alongside Maine thrashers Hessian for a weekender on the East Coast after playing their release show this Friday at Cherry St. Station in Wallingford, CT, and making an appearance earlier in August at the Death to False Metal fest alongside Valkyrie and fellow Connecticut natives Bedroom Rehab Corporation, among many others. They’re maybe not the first to revel the territory they do, but they certainly seem to enjoy it.

If you’re at work, I’m just going to say flat out that you probably shouldn’t watch this. I don’t care if you have your own cubicle, office or building, or if you’re nursing a crush on Pam Grier as all-consuming as that which is clearly driving NightBitch to pay such homage. Wait till you get home. Beyond that and any political issue one might take with the band, I’ll just say “enjoy” and let this one speak for itself.

Live dates follow the video:

NightBitch, “Caged Heat”

From the NightBitch 10″ EP out now on The Ajna Offensive/Doomentia Records.

Nightbitch live dates:
06/05 Cherry St. Station, Wallingford, CT (Record Release)
06/28 Cafe Nine, New Haven, CT (free matinee)
08/14 The Outer Space Ballroom, Hamden, CT, Death to False Metal Fest
08/21 Lucky 13, Brooklyn, NY W/ Python (ex-Villains)
08/27 Sidebar, Baltimore MD W/ Hessian
08/28 TBA Richmond, VA W/ Hessian
08/29 Kung Fu Necktie, Philadelphia, PA W/ Hessian

NightBitch on Thee Facebooks

NightBitch on Bandcamp

The Ajna Offensive

Doomentia Records

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Eye of the Stoned Goat 5: Wounded Giant and Curse the Son Added to Lineup

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 28th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster


Two more adds to Eye of the Stoned Goat 5 this afternoon, and they expand the festival’s reach just about as far as it can go and still be in the continental US. The fest, which is set for June 12 and 13 in Amityville, Long Island, has just announced that Seattle’s Wounded Giant will make their first appearance and that Connecticut’s Curse the Son will return for their second time to the Eye of the Stoned Goat‘s migratory stage after taking part in Eye of the Stoned Goat 4 last May in Worcester, Massachusetts (review here).

What the bands have in common — besides riffs — is an allegiance with New Jersey-based STB Records. The label oversaw a long-awaited vinyl issue of Curse the Son‘s spectacularly stoned 2012 outing, Psychache (review here), last year, and a second pressing is already in the works for Wounded Giant‘s newly-released-and-gone split with Goya (review here) through STB, which as ever is giving the heavy due treatment in an assortment of limited pressings and special editions.

Wounded Giant will so far be traveling the farthest to attend Eye of the Stoned Goat 5, the lineup of which also features East Coast acts like Lord FowlWhite DynomiteJohn Wilkes BoothWeed is WeedGozuKingsnake and It’s Not Night: It’s Space, but I wouldn’t be surprised if fest organizer Brendan Burns has a couple tricks up his sleeve still to come for the two-day event. We’ll see what comes, I guess.

Announcements came through thusly:

You people ready for some more heavy hitters..?

Of course you are…

It’s a honor to have with us on this years fest, the blistering monstrous sounds of Seattle Washington’s very own Wounded Giant!!! Also on board for their second ‘Stoned Goat is Connecticut’s own, and STB Records stalwarts Curse the Son!!!

Wounded Giant, Lightning Medicine (2013)

Curse the Son, Psychache (2012)

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Bedroom Rehab Corporation Finish Recording New Album

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 12th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

bedroom rehab corporation

A mastering process still lay ahead of them, but Connecticut duo Bedroom Rehab Corporation have completed recording their second album, Fortunate Some. Bassist/vocalist Adam Wujtewicz and drummer Meghan Killimade will release it sometime later this year either on their own or through a yet-to-be-announced label, and I guess that’s not really the news, since it’s not like they’d make the album and then not let anyone hear it — snatch it back all like “no way it’s ours!” — but the fact that they’re done tracking it is the part you’re supposed to focus on. Their 2013 debut, Red Over Red (review here), impressed with its variety and impact, but where the two-piece have continued to shine is on stage, so I’m interested to hear how they’ve translated their live ferocity to the upcoming Justin Pizzoferrato-recorded long-player.

They posted a couple studio updates during their time making Fortunate Some, the rest of which you can view at their website and the last of which follows here:

bedroom rehab corporation fortunate some

Studio Day 4

I couldn’t write about day 4 on day 4 because i was driving home and settling back in but as I listened to our reference mixes in my car last night or now on my home stereo I’m starting to realize what we’ve done. We spent all of day 4 mixing, re-amping and applying effects but mostly listening. When you’re critically listening like that you don’t get to take in the whole picture. Having now had time to do that it is apparent truly how far we have come since Red Over Red.

While we still love those songs and that album, Fortunate Some will be more than a step forward… it’s a short sprint ahead of Red Over Red. Needless to say Justin is a hugely responsible for this. The notes and suggestions he gave us as well as his ability to mic a room and mix sounds to make them more than a sum of their inputs has made this album so much bigger and better. Not only was he willing to let us get weird when we felt the need but he encouraged it and nurtured our weirdness and helped translate it to sound. So thank you Justin, you have once again made recording an enjoyable and enriching experience.

I’m not exactly sure what else to say here. The recording process is complete and mastering wil be taking place in around 3 weeks once again with Carl Saff. We still have to figure out art and things so don’t hold your breath but rest assured we are going to continue to work to get this album out to you. Be prepared for weirdness and some singing and a whole bunch of heavy and did I mention weirdness? Thanks for reading, keep your eyes peeled for more updates as they happen.

Bedroom Rehab Corporation, Red Over Red (2013)

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Midnight Premiere: When the Deadbolt Breaks, “The Woods are Full of Killers”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 2nd, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

when the deadbolt breaks the woods are full of killers

I don’t know much of anything about anything, but if you’re out in the woods and you see the above aviator-plague-beak-robe-guy hanging out with a couple cronies, some in, some out of gas masks,  you have just entered the wrong woods. But then again, Connecticut trio When the Deadbolt Breaks could probably write a song about a laundromat and make it horrifying. Some bands just have a gift.

It’s midnight, and tonight is the release party for When the Deadbolt Breaks‘ video, “The Woods are Full of Killers,” which is the second clip from 2013’s Drifting Towards the Edge of the Earth. It’s a special night, with guitarist/vocalist Aaron Lewis pulling a sort of triple-duty in the malevolent drone-doomers Deadbolt and the more rock-minded Buzzard Canyon while also showing not only this video but a selection of his photography as well at The Reserve in Meriden, CT, which I’m not familiar with but surely isn’t prepared for the onslaught of volume it will have received by the time this goes live. The show also marks the live debut of new drummer Dumas, who’ll be entering the studio with Lewis and bassist Mike Parkyn later this year to record their next full-length.

“The Woods are Full of Killers” itself is a monster. A 13-minute onslaught of jet-black psychedelic drones and visceral sludge, it takes its time to unfold as one might expect, and works at a grueling pace to craft a threatening, chaotic swirl. The video switches back and forth between a narrative — bondage ritual in the woods, featuring our friend above — and performance footage, but the whole thing is made for lights-off horror, and whether you’re talking about the song or the video that accompanies, black and white save for bizarre washes of color, the whole affair is pretty warped.

Clearly somebody went into the wrong woods.

Details about the production and tonight’s release show — happening right now! — are below, and more stills will be arriving shortly at Lewis‘ photography website,


When the Deadbolt Breaks, “The Woods are Full of Killers”

On January 2 When the Deadbolt Breaks will be releasing our 2nd video for from our 2013 album, “Drifting Towards the Edge of the Earth” for the “the woods are full of killers “. The concept behind this video came from a photo shoot idea I (Lounge SevenZeroEight Photography., had been developing for quite some time. While we were shooting a video I also did a photo shoot with all the girls involved.

January 2 will also be a gallery showing as well as the live video viewing at The Reserve in Meriden CT. This gallery will include 3 large shoots that I’ve done over the past couple years but nobody has seen yet. I was waiting for the right time. The Blood Angel shoot, The Dark Deception shoot, and the shoot that coincides with the video.

“Woods Are Full Of Killers” the second video from CT’s When The Deadbolt Breaks; takes you on a mind bending journeydouble album “Drifting Towards the Edge of the Earth” debilitating doom/sludge metamorphosis by When the Deadbolt Breaks from the Ear One Productions CD release.

Written by Aaron Lewis.
Directed by Aaron Lewis and Charlie Winthal.
Edited by Aaron Lewis and Charlie Winthal.
Visual Effects by Charlie Winthal.

Purchase limited edition double CD digipack

When the Deadbolt Breaks on Thee Facebooks

When the Deadbolt Breaks on Bandcamp

Lounge 708 Photography

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