King Gorm Premiere “Beyond Black Rainbow” Video from Self-Titled Debut

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Reviews on June 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

king gorm

San Diego’s Pay someone to I Want To Write My Thesis: Yes, Now Do my essay is no longer a students headache Get cheap write an essay service at ? 8.99$ per Page 100% King Gorm will issue their self-titled debut album on July 31. “Beyond Black Rainbow” is the first single from the record, which runs a tidy nine cuts and 38 minutes, primed for a classic-style LP issue either at the behest of the band or some adventurous imprint that might pick them up subsequent to the initial self-release. At the forefront in the band creatively is guitarist/vocalist Essay Help On Japans Modernization works on strong principles of ensuring that each customer who places their trust in us goes back happy. We know how important Francis Roberts whose particular take on classic progressive heavy rock is recognizable here from his other outfit, find dissertation online jobs Admission go now how do you write a website in an essay do write a bibliography Old Man Wizard, though Do Assignments - Proofreading and proofediting aid from best professionals. witness the benefits of expert writing help available here Instead of King Gorm are distinguished particularly through their use of harmonized vocals care of organist/synthesist Are you looking for someone to do homework for money? If yes then you have come to the right place. TFTH is one of the best http://www.uk-officesupplies.com/my-xyz-homework/ website on the Saki Chan and drummer http://www.joyshop.it/?is-homework-necessary-statistics Close. Provides custom writing, ebook writers for a ghost writer services - best essay. When they seams to browse these Dylan Marks — the band is completed by bassist college application writing zemach Anorexia Nervosa Research Paper help writing 5 paragraph essay research papers on english literature Erich Beckmann — as well as the prominent organ work of Free diwali pollution essay . We support the finest freelance writers that will precise your personal providing tasks, no matter the level. Through the Chan running alongside the galloping riffs of songs like “Freedom Calls,” “Beyond Black Rainbow” and the penultimate “Slaughter the King,” the latter of which might be the most direct dogwhistle of the group’s abiding influence from Only the best writing service can promise you top grades for Write My Paper Homework. Trust our professional writers to make it all look simple. Ritchie Blackmore‘s style of proto-NWOBHM riffing in compare cats and dogs Should Abortion Be Legal Essay english essay service man service god aufbau der arbeit dissertation Rainbow. To go with these rushing pieces, the band also offers broader-reaching cuts like “Four Heroes” on side A and “The Witch of Irondale” on side B, as well as the distinctive centerpiece “Song from Brighter Days” that rounds out the first half of the record following the quiet interlude “Irondale Burning.”

The band take their name from a Danish king who ruled from 936-958 and was known as “Gorm the Languid” or “Gorm the Old,” and the album follows a plotline around Irondale at least to some loose degree. The opening “Intro” that feeds king gorm self titledinto “Freedom Calls,” as well as “Irondale Burning” and the concluding instrumental “Ultimate Reality” all add to an atmosphere that stands in league with the medieval theme further bolstered in the lyrics. Need pay someone to http://sommelier.dn.ua/how-to-write-an-executive-summary-for-an-assignment/ for me? Find out suitable service to write my assignment in Australia from professionals on GradeScout Roberts, who is no stranger to a theatrical presentation as a member of pirate-folk-metallers Where can you ask, will you How To Properly Write A College Admission Essay errors? and get exactly what you paid for without risk? Our site is the place you need. Our editors from the The Dread Crew of Oddwood, works well as a storyteller here, though the songs do more than simply describe the narrative, and from the outset with “Freedom Calls” picking up from the intro, individual pieces find ways to stand out while balancing classical European folk, progressive rock and proto-metal along the way. This, coupled with the four-piece’s glam-style image gives  Buy Book College Application Essay Writing Service Jobs. You're probably reading this page because you've been assigned a book report. Take a minute and wipe the sweat off your King Gorm a peculiar niche to occupy, but being superficially weird only suits them all the more since their songwriting is so precise and the performances as captured on their debut so assured of their purpose. As a record, go now. PaperWritingServices.com is the cheap paper writing service which offers high quality and low cost papers. King Gorm is dynamic and broad-reaching, engaging with melody and its narrative, and as a debut, it holds particular promise of future tales to be told. As the verse of “Freedom Calls” puts it, “Irondale — our return was foretold by the stars/A hero’s born, delivered by the fire and the sword.” An auspicious beginning, indeed.

While perhaps  custom homepage thesis themes - Let professionals accomplish their tasks: get the necessary paper here and expect for the best score Instead of wasting time in King Gorm‘s legend has yet to be written, the potential for intertwining folk and prog and early metal as demonstrated in “Song from Brighter Days” or in “The Witch of Irondale” speaks to the drive toward individualism at root in the band’s persona. Those listening who might be less familiar with  Roberts‘ prior work might find some likeness in his approach with Ghost or perhaps Opeth‘s Mikael Åkerfeldt, and I don’t think that’s coincidence, but what comes across most of all in these songs — the narrative aside — is that individuality, and that proves to be just one among the reasons for the album’s ultimate success.

You can see the video for “Beyond Black Rainbow” premiering below, directed by Reece Miller. Preorders for King Gorm‘s King Gorm are available through Bandcamp.

Enjoy:

King Gorm, “Beyond Black Rainbow” official video premiere

Official music video for the song “Beyond Black Rainbow” from California rock band KING GORM’s debut album.

https://kinggorm.bandcamp.com/

Filmed and edited by Reece Miller

Music and Lyrics by Francis Roberts

Guitar, Vocals – Francis Roberts
Bass Guitar – Erich Beckmann
Drums, Vocals – Dylan Marks
Organ, Synth, Vocals – Saki Chan

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Glass Eye Post “X-Y” Single; Announce Debut EP & Album

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

glass eye

Okay, so here’s what’s up. There’s a lot going on in this announcement, which I actually put together from two separate announcements. Los Angeles’ Glass Eye is a newcomer psychedelic project headed by guitarist/vocalist Febian Perez. There’s a new single called “X-Y” out now that you can stream below. It comes from Glass Eye‘s debut album, Like a Razor to the Eye, which is being released later this year.

Separate from that, Glass Eye will issue their first EP, Somewhere, Nowhere, on June 25, and I’m pretty sure “X-Y” isn’t on that at all, though I could be wrong. Either way, one assumes the lead single is a fair sampling of Glass Eye‘s wares, and the melted-down shuffle it elicits is suitably moving for a band/project that seems to have come together with a strong idea of sonic intent.

Info follows, as per the PR wire:

glass eye x y

Los Angeles based Glass Eye is excited to premiere their transcendent debut EP.

Glass Eye have completed work on their newest single ‘X=Y’ in anticipation of a late 2020 release of their LP ‘Like A Razor To The Eye’. Glass Eye sounds as though they were a great lost garage-psych treasure from the 90s, blended into the modern age with poignant lyricism and unique composition.

‘X-Y’ is one of the album’s tracks, recorded over the course of a year at Bedrock in LA, his home studio and finally mixed by Erik Wofford at Cacophony Recorders in Austin, of Black Angels and Explosions in the Sky fame. The song takes the listener on a pounding and frenetic journey through a madness dreamed up in darkness.

Glass Eye have completed work on their newest EP ‘Somewhere, Nowhere’ in anticipation of a June 25th, 2020 release. The EP showcases all of the darker and fluid intricacies of Glass Eye’s complex songwriting.

Originally from New York City; Glass Eye was founded by Febian Perez in 2019 after many years of touring, recording and performing in various projects. In early 2020, he took the leap and dove head first into finishing a series of albums that he began work on in the year prior. Taking it into his own hands, he composed and performed all the instruments on ‘Somewhere, Nowhere’. With tonal influences ranging from driving dance grooves and lush soundscapes to dissonant explosions and hallucinatory treks into madness…This EP is sure to sink its hook deep inside.

The EP was recorded and mixed over the course of a year and a half, at his home studio by Febian Perez.

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Glass Eye, “X-Y”

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Keverra Premiere “Bathsheba” Video from Self-Titled Debut

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

keverra

Like razorblades into the eardrums, so goes the scathe of our lives. Los Angeles-based Keverra waste not a moment in delivering same on their self-titled Seeing Red Records debut album, comprising 10 tracks of alternately atmospheric and churning, precision-doled aggro fury, taking the bounce of West Coast noise rock born of skate culture punk 40-ish years ago and digging into something meaner, harsher, and more thickly toned with it. “Albion” rolls, “Bathsheba” crunches with starts and stops, but the message and bite and disaffection remain consistent.

There’s no shortage of sludge underpinning either, and that they know what they’re doing is less of a surprise when one considers the band’s lineage: bassist Scott Renner tenuring in Goatsnake and playing live in Sourvein, drummer Mateo Pinkerton keverra keverraformerly in -(16)- and ahead-of-their-time victory-bringer metal traditionalists Crom, as well as Buzzov*en, and vocalist/guitarist Kurk Stevens in his noise outfit Mayan Bull, which accounts for the ambience strewn throughout and between the longer cuts in pieces like “Incendiare,” “Anasthetic,” the feedback-driven “Bitter Air of Exile” and “Funerary,” the low static drone of which which appears right ahead of punishing final duo “No God” and “Black Tie Affair,” marked by a great chugging and gnashing of teeth.

The character of Keverra as an album though isn’t necessarily limited to one or the other side. That is, while in a certain sense it trades between atmospheric interludes and pummeling noise-sludge metal, the lines aren’t so strictly drawn, and a song like “Bathsheba” or the later “Object to be Destroyed,” or even “No God”, has the room to flesh out as it needs to. I wouldn’t call anything so intense patient — it’s not trying to be patient, it’s trying to eat your face — but there is a method at work behind Keverra‘s songwriting and while their mission might be distinctly furious, they’re working to broaden the palette of noise in a way that doesn’t let go of the anger at its core but comes across as a little more contemplative; or at very least they’re aiming the flamethrower before they torch whatever’s in their path.

I’ll spare you the tie-in to the pandemic or the sociopolitical climate, or, you know, the climate climate — since all that stuff is overarching and relevant anyhow, and if you find your skin crawling with bitter restlessness, you’ll be glad to know that Keverra‘s Keverra is name-your-price at the band’s Bandcamp now.

A quote from the band follows the video and gives some background.

Please enjoy:

Keverra, “Bathsheba” official video premiere

Keverra on “Bathsheba”:

The song ‘Bathsheba’ is about suppression and the dynamic and vexing nature of its many manifestations.

The footage for the video was shot in March; eerily, just a few days before Los Angeles went into quarantine.

We originally met our friend (Photographer/DP) Todd Hickey that day to hammer out the live portion of a video that was intended to be edited in w/ other concept footage. Given the utter excising of live music from all of our lives we decided that it might be best to take a step toward filling that void by just showing us do our thing.

Hails, stay safe, hope to see everyone real soon!

KEVERRA is:
Kurk Stevens: Guitars, Vocals, Noise
Scott Renner: Bass
Mateo Pinkerton: Drums, Vocals, Samples

Keverra, Keverra (2020)

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Friday Full-Length: Red Sparowes, At the Soundless Dawn

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

It’s ironic that an album so clearly based around the end of existence as we know it through a sixth great extinction should be so comforting. In 2005, when Red Sparowes issued At the Soundless Dawn, the notion on which the 62-minute seven-tracker was based was a relatively unknown idea, and since then not only has the science behind it become more widely accepted but countless other bands have taken their cues from Red Sparowes and from the world around them generally and openly discussed issues of climate change, nature and humanity’s relation to it. It doesn’t seem fair to attribute that to the Los Angeles-based outfit alone — everyone lives on the planet, after all, and the subject is relevant politically as well as in terms of the sheer ecosystem destruction — but they helped pave the way certainly. Perhaps doubly impressive that’s the case since At the Soundless Dawn is instrumental.

The subject matter was just one of the ways in which Red Sparowes‘ debut, out initially on CD through Neurot Recordings and vinyl through Robotic Empire, was groundbreaking. Post-metal was just beginning to take shape at the time, with stylistic godfathers Neurosis having released The Eye of Every Storm and Isis issuing Panopticon the year before. Bands like Minsk and Mouth of the Architect also making striking debuts and Russian Circles were beginning to find their way in terms of aesthetic. It was an exciting time for a new progressive vision of heavy, and At the Soundless Dawn offered not only that, but a distinct literary sensibility owing in part to the structure of its titles. To wit, the tracklisting:

1. Alone and Unaware, the Landscape was Transformed in Front of Our Eyes
2. Buildings Began to Stretch Wide Across the Sky, And the Air Filled With A Reddish Glow
3. The Soundless Dawn Came Alive as Cities Began to Mark the Horizon
4. Mechanical Sounds Cascaded Through the City Walls and Everyone Reveled in Their Ignorance
5. A Brief Moment of Clarity Broke Through the Deafening Hum, But it Was Too Late
6. Our Happiest Days Slowly Began to Turn into Dust
7. The Sixth Extinction Crept Up Slowly, Like Sunlight Through the Shutters, as We Looked Back in Regret

Reading those now it’s hard not to think of looking at wildfires in the distance, raging so hard that the smoke they’re putting out is adding to the pollution that was their cause in the first place.

red sparowes at the soundless dawn

Each track, thusly descriptive, becomes an evocative chapter in this overarching narrative, and with ties to both Isis through guitarist/organist Bryant Clifford Meyer and guitarist/bassist Jeff Caxide and Neurosis through guitarist/pianist Josh Graham — who handled visuals for Neurosis live for years as well as artwork and did the same for Red Sparowes; his art has continued to work in themes of nature and climate — as well as Marriages through bassist/pedal steel guitarist Greg BurnsRed Sparowes immediately had the pedigree to validate their ambition. That is to say, 15 years ago, a band making their debut on Neurot with members associated with IsisNeurosis and Marriages would have an easy time getting their foot in the door of listeners. I have to think that the same would apply if At the Soundless Dawn were coming out today. Maybe more so.

On top of that, however, Red Sparowes would earn every ounce of acclaim they’d reap. The depths and sprawl of At the Soundless Dawn remain likewise immersive and staggering, and in moments of shining pedal steel giving way to ambient synthesized and manipulated voice drones like “Mechanical Sounds Cascaded…” or in the relatively driving recurring riffs of “Buildings Began to Stretch Wide…” — particularly Neurosis-derived — and the circa-midpoint wash of 19-minute closer “The Sixth Extinction Crept Up Slowly…,” and in the quiet reaches that follow and seem to manifest extinction itself, At the Soundless Dawn succeeds in telling its story without saying a single word. And though obviously the finale is a focal point as it consumes nearly a third of the album’s total runtime, shorter pieces like “A Brief Moment of Clarity…” — the pedal steel of which reminds me of repurposed Yawning Man guitar tone — and “The Soundless Dawn Came Alive…” and the penultimate echoing “Our Happiest Days…” play an essential role in casting a vision of heavy that is no less meditative than it is weighted. These are ideas one might now take for granted in no small part because of the work Red Sparowes do in these songs.

The band would have reunited in April — they may yet do so in 2021 — at the Roadburn Festival in the Netherlands. Timely because of the 15th anniversary of this album, no doubt their taking the stage would and will be welcome anytime it happens. The lineup would change over time as CaxideGraham and original drummer Dana Berkowitz left and the likes of Emma Ruth Rundle (then also of Marriages), Dave Clifford (Pleasure Forever) and Brendan Tobin (Made Out of Babies) — among others — would make their way into and out of the group. The second album, 2006’s Every Red Heart Shines Toward the Red Sun, took on a more directly sociopolitcal theme while furthering the debut’s sonic purposes, and 2008’s Toshi Kasai-produced Aphorisms EP and 2010’s The Fear is Excruciating, but Therein Lies the Answer long-player (on Sargent House) — which I apparently bought at Roadburn 2010 — round out the main catalog, though splits along the way with Gregor Samsa, Grails, and Made Out of Babies & Battle of Mice provided quicker immersion.

Maybe Red Sparowes ran their natural course in the same way that Isis did, though it certainly happened in less time for Bryant Clifford Meyer in the band considered widely his own. I’ll admit it had been a while since I last listened in earnest to At the Soundless Dawn, and as I remember seeing them during this era (as much as I remember anything from that era), I was looking forward to doing so again now. The world is what it is. Sad, mostly. At the Soundless Dawn is warm and prescient in kind, and offers escapism even as it hinges on direct confrontation with complexities and the delirium tremens of our times.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

What would it take for a global pandemic to fall out of the lead spot on the news? I don’t know who asked, but I’m sorry they did. The killing of George Floyd is a tragedy, and while I’m skeptical it will result in any grand structural change, particularly with white apartheid embedded in the current structure of the American republic owing to gerrymandering and voter suppression, seeing people out across the country calling for change has been a reminder that the majority of citizens across demographics actually support progressive causes, and it is the minority who lead and do so to serve their own interests.

Consider the US president mobilizing prison guards to disperse a peaceful protest to take a photo holding a Bible in front of a church that would soon denounce him. Constitutional? No, not really. More like white supremacist fascism couched as “strong leadership.” In fact there is nothing strong about it.

I generally don’t believe in the power of nonviolent protest to enact meaningful change, but if you haven’t given money to Black Lives Matter, the ACLU, the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Bail Fund, or any other progressive cause speaking out this week, now’s a good time.

I understand now how Germans who disagreed with the Nazis got stuck. I have a home. I have a young child. My wife has a job. We have this house. And who knows if we could get across a border anyway? Where would we go? Tilburg? Canada? Ireland? The Patient Mrs. and I have talked numerous times about “when it’s time to leave” and honestly, the mobilization of legally-specious secret police forces — and subsequent lying to the press about it — seems to be a good time. Hell, locking kids in cages seemed to be a good time, even if our white privilege protected us from actually experiencing that horror first-hand. But where would we go? Could we just leave? What would we take? What about my family? What about her family?

I don’t hold any great love of this country. I speak English, which is convenient here, but it’s convenient in a bunch of places. I think patriotism is downright silly, but I love my family. I love her family. What about them? What about the few real-life friends that I have? Some have already left. Should I follow? Can I?

That’s how it happens. It’s easy now to look back on World War II-era Europe and wonder why everyone being persecuted or who were scared of speaking out didn’t just leave. Many did. And honestly, my wife is a published author on record as supporting radical left wing and feminist ideals, and because of that I fear for her. But we have a life. Can we go? Is it time? Am I being paranoid? Would they ever “come for us” in any meaningful sense? And even if they didn’t, doesn’t that just make me all the more complicit if I don’t actively resist? Isn’t the all-or-nothing nature of fascism, not to mention the life and death stakes, emblematic of the need to take a strong stand against it?

And then it’s too late.

That’s how it happens.

Life unfolds in a series of minutes spent waiting for other things.

I would say practice radical love, but I’m not sure that’s the answer. If you’re out there protesting, or vigil-ing, or whatever, watch your back, and be fucking careful. There’s still a pandemic on, even if the numbers are down right now.

FRM.

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Days of Rona: Melissa Pinion of Stygian Crown

Posted in Features on June 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

stygian crown melissa

Days of Rona: Melissa Pinion of Stygian Crown (Los Angeles, California)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

We all live in areas that are under lockdown, so we can’t rehearse as a group. Numerous shows and festivals we were scheduled to play have been canceled or postponed as a result of the pandemic. However, we have been keeping up our chops so we can come out strong when venues begin to reopen. This downtime has given us the chance to begin developing riffs, basic song structures and lyrics for a follow-up album.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

It’s hard to say without actually seeing the inside of hospitals, but based on statistics, it appears that the stay-at-home orders are actually working at the moment and our healthcare sector is handling our cases without having to turn away anyone else with critical needs. The initial panic that we saw in mid-March has vanished, and in its place has appeared an anticipation for the world around us to get back to “normal.” The problem is, no one really knows what that means.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

There are two sides to this. Obviously, we feel badly for all the bands whose primary source of income comes from touring. Countless support staff in the entertainment industry have lost their jobs too. What many artists have done in the wake of this crisis is turned a negative situation into something positive. All of the live-streaming performances have been inspiring to see. And the money being raised by these artists for various causes shows us that listeners really care about the bands they follow.

Additionally, Germany’s “Keep It True” festival compiled hours and hours of past footage and presented it on YouTube to give fans something to enjoy on the weekend the festival was supposed to take place. We hope this positive vibe continues when the virus gets under control.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

Stygian Crown will release its debut album amid a pandemic, but our passion to create and perform will not be stopped by the coronavirus. And with the support of the metal community, we’ll be back with a vengeance before you know it!

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Days of Rona: Mike Scalzi of The Lord Weird Slough Feg

Posted in Features on May 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

slough feg mike scalzi

Days of Rona: Mike Scalzi of The Lord Weird Slough Feg (San Francisco, California)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

It has been rough because we had 5 festivals scheduled for this Spring/summer, and of course they were all cancelled. Quite a let-down, but necessary of course. However, as a band we’re actually making good use of the time. We’ve created a podcast called “Slough Feg Radio” (http://sloughfeg.com/feed/). We’re up to episode #7 I believe. Since we cannot rehearse—Adrian and I meet at our rehearsal space each week (with masks, gloves, and a long distance between us!) and record a radio pod cast— we basically dj weird/eclectic music, including some of our own songs, demos, weird outtakes, etc. that we think might be interesting for people to hear, and banter and babble back and forth about the music, the band history, funny stories of what our lives are like now etc. It’s been great because it’s been well received and we have quite a few listeners, and it gives us, and the fans a feeling that the band is very much alive and active during this ‘downtime’.

We just finished an album last year, so I’m actually not really in ‘writing mode.’ Which is annoying because obviously this would be the time to write music — but we were ready to go do a bunch of live shows, so it makes it all the more annoying that we can’t. Oh well. If this lasts long enough perhaps we’ll write some more stuff, but for now we’re pretty excited about Slough Feg Radio.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

The public response has been generally good. San Francisco (where I live) was the first US city to practice shelter in place, the local and state government did a good job of getting on the case early, and as a result there has been an extremely low rate of infection and death count here. So I’ve been pretty lucky when you look at the kind of numbers other US cities are looking at. San Francisco is a city with relatively few older people, although there is much population density. New York has faced unbelievable tragedy, obviously. But even in the dire case of NYC, the local and State Governments have done an incredible job of fighting the virus.

If we had legitimate national leadership at this time, that would help considerably. But we clearly do not, so we must let the individual states do the heavy lifting and hope they can bear the burden. I think some of them are stepping up and doing a fantastic job — and I’m lucky enough to live in a state that had a pretty solid state government.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

I’m not sure how the music community has responded, outside of the mainstream music media (because I see them on TV, internet, etc.). I suppose they’ve responded pretty well, and pretty positively. Many mainstream musicians are doing remote performances and writing songs about the pandemic, etc. As for lesser known musicians, I am not as sure what they are up to — the ones I know, including myself, seem to be producing whatever they can at the time— as stated above, I’m really enjoying out podcast radio show, and I’ve had a lot of good responses from fans, telling us our show relieves some of their boredom and frustration sitting around the house all day etc.

As for myself, I was pretty terrified at first I suppose—for myself, my family and friends. Fortunately for me, nobody I know has passed away from the virus. Very, very lucky. I do have some friends who contracted it though and went through hell. I have also been rather bored at times — I am not a person who can sit at home all the time. So since the beginning of this thing my schedule has been active — getting out on my bike and riding in the mountains almost every day. Discouraged? At first yes after those festival cancellations. Inspired? At times. I was super frustrated and feeling trapped a month ago. Now I have adapted a little, fell into a bit of a new schedule, and am somewhat hopeful for the future. You can only get so terrified, angry, etc., until you begin to adapt (hopefully).

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

The band will survive. We’ve survived for 29 years, and we ain’t stopping now!! this is the longest Slough Feg has EVER gone without practicing. So It’s a bit maddening — but we’ll survive. Everyone is in good spirits and eagerly awaiting the day we can practice and play gigs again.

My daily schedule is basically: get up way too late (at 11 or noon!!) do whatever work I have to do (I teach a class that is now online of course) pack a bag with some food, a book, a face-mask etc. and try to get out the door by 2:30 or 3:00 on my bike, ride across the Golden Gate Bridge and into the Marin Headlands. This is truly inspiring. Another great thing about San Francisco is that you get out of the city, into areas of incredible natural beauty in less than an hour on a bicycle. I stay out in the headlands where there are parks, beaches, trails etc. until about 7 or 8 at night. I see very few people there. It’s saved my life — I would be utterly insane if I could not do this and had to stay in the house all day like many others are doing. I also work one day a week at a Brewery, serving beer and food for takeout. Gotta be careful there, but I am, and I’m grateful to have the work.

What have I learned so far from Covid 19? Well, mostly that I don’t wanna get it!! Honestly I think the most important thing I’ve learned is how important it is to stay healthy and strong as you grow older. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for the rock ‘n roll lifestyle: drinking yourself half to death and being a parched-out wretch of a human being, sleeping in a different place every night. That stuff is great fun and has its place — mostly when you’re young. But that stuff can only go so far until it stops being fun — and especially during a health crisis. Whether you’re in good shape or not can be a matter and life and death.

But maybe this whole thing will be a big wake up call for the entire human race — reminding us of what is really important. NOT wealth and status and all that nonsense we spend our lives worrying about. That stuff ain’t gonna do shit for anyone is the face of a pandemic. Your health, activity, creativity, and the people you surround yourself with — that’s what matters in a pandemic, and in life. Period.

http://www.sloughfeg.com/
https://www.facebook.com/sloughfegofficial/
https://www.cruzdelsurmusic.com/blog/
https://www.facebook.com/cruzdelsurmusic/
https://cruzdelsurmusic.bandcamp.com/

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King Gorm to Release Self-Titled Debut July 31; “Beyond Black Rainbow” Streaming Now

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 26th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

king gorm

Those who’ve followed guitarist/vocalist Francis Roberts‘ work in Old Man Wizard or the pirate-themed Dread Crew of Oddwood should have some notion of what to expect from the relatively new outfit King Gorm, but the vibe — not to mention the band — is different across the latter’s impending self-titled debut, which is set to release July 31. The San Diego-based troupe dig into classic heavy progressive rock with a deft and masterful hand, retaining an air of cultistry without proving any more cartoonish than they intend. A track from the record, “Beyond Black Rainbow,” proves the point nicely, but is just a snippet of the band’s organ-heavy, weirdo-friendly wares. I’ll hope to have more to come on this one ahead of its arrival.

Until then, the PR wire brings ample backstory and info:

king gorm self titled

King Gorm release new single “Beyond Black Rainbow”

San Diego throwback rockers KING GORM have just released their new single “Beyond Black Rainbow” via their Bandcamp. The song is recommended for fans of Rainbow and Deep Purple.

Listen to the song here: https://kinggorm.bandcamp.com/track/beyond-black-rainbow-2

From King Gorm, releases July 31, 2020.

Some bands often claim they are ‘taking it back to the days of old’, but in King Gorm’s case it is quite literal. Much like their namesake – a Danish ruler from the 900s – the San Diego collective focus on telling bard-like tales, though updated in the form of classic rock. Their self-titled début album is a bold first step, reinventing familiarity by taking the legends of old and putting a modern spin on them.

Across the record, the listener bears witness to Hammond organs and screaming guitar solos duking it out, while bass lines and frantic drumming run like madmen underneath. The freshness of this music can be attributed to numerous factors, one of which being that it was recorded live from the floor (with only vocal overdubs), thus the chemistry of the musicianship shines through such as on “Four Heroes”. The band are also unafraid to go exploring, resulting in tracks like “The Witch of Irondale”, which swings from insistent prog rock to proto-doom in its 7-minute duration, or “Slaughter the King” and “Ultimate Reality”, two songs showcasing the wild nature of the band’s live show.

So which legends’ names are heard echoing within the album’s walls? Ritchie Blackmore figures prominently, not least for his fantasy-driven lyrics and powerful rock riffing (especially during Deep Purple and Dio-era Rainbow days). Elements of Led Zeppelin (the dragons and wizards-driven “Song From Brighter Days”) and Pink Floyd also float to the surface, such as in mastermind Francis Roberts’ soothing bard-like voice (which, for a latterday reference, also bears comparison with Motorpsycho or Arjen Lucassen). But this is more than an homage – there is a real sense of taking this music to places where those bands did not reach, reshaping it in exciting ways.

King Gorm is the sound of a band who may be relatively new to each other, but certainly not new to the game. With their combined experience in an eclectic mixture of bands like Old Man Wizard, Dread Crew of Oddwood, Kirby’s Dream Band, Beekeeper, Eukaryst, White Wizzard and others), there is no shred of doubt that these four can and have put together a top-notch rock n’ roll record that is bound to capture both classic rock and fantasy fans alike.

Track listing:
1.Intro
2. Freedom Calls
3. Four Heroes
4. Irondale Burning
5. Song From Brighter Days
6. Beyond Black Rainbow
7. The Witch of Irondale
8. Slaughter the King
9. Ultimate Reality

King Gorm are:
Francis Roberts – electric guitar, vocals, music & lyrics (Old Man Wizard, ex-Dread Crew of Oddwood)
Erich Beckmann – bass guitar (Kirby’s Dream Band, Grim Luck)
Dylan Marks – drums, percussion, vocals (Beekeeper, Fermentor)
Saki Chan – Hammond organ, ARP Odyssey, mellotron, vocals

https://www.facebook.com/king.gorm.usa/
https://www.instagram.com/king.gorm/
https://kinggorm.bandcamp.com/

King Gorm, King Gorm (2020)

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Days of Rona: Susie McMullan, Jamie McCathie & Jordan Perkins-Lewis of Brume

Posted in Features on May 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

brume-on-zoom

Days of Rona: Susie McMullan, Jamie McCathie & Jordan Perkins-Lewis of Brume (San Francisco, California)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual?

Susie McMullan: I love and respect Jamie and Jordan, they are family. I deal with it like I do my own family, I am there on the front line if they need me and try not to have any expectations of them at the same time. Jamie, Jordan and I are not interested in being famous or popular. We like to make music that is meaningful to us, something we’d listen too, something that connects with others that may feel the same way. As soon as it feels like a job or a burden, we back off or slow down. It is the luxury of being a musician as an adult with other talents and interests. For instance, Jordan was recently nominated for an Emmy for his video work, Jamie won a Grammy with his design work at a fancy design firm, and I love science and engineering just as much as making music.

When you don’t know how the music industry will change or how long it will be before we can interact safely or if you can pay your bills next month, then we are all living with this low level stress. Stress will manifest itself in ugly ways like flakiness, laziness, eating disorders, relationship problems and health issues. The kindest thing we can do for each other is drop our expectations of one another outside of mutual respect and help people feel less lonely.

Jordan Perkins-Lewis: All band activities have been cancelled indefinitely. I’m just chillin’.

Jamie McCathie: I’m lucky enough to have a job, an amazing wife and kid at home and time to relax or do house projects. We are bummed to not be touring our recent album but man, mostly we miss drinking warm beers at our practice space and hanging out together.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are?

SM: I feel like people are doing the best they can with the information they have, especially my California neighbors. On a national level, it has been deplorable. Our president has lied to us, created unnecessary panic, unnecessary delays and a national sense of hopelessness.

JPL: Feeling good overall. Bay Area!

From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

SM: Imagine if your government’s political agenda is more important than public health. That is what is happening in the US. The people of the united states are being lied too, mislead and left in a state of confusion because facts do not align with the administration’s political agenda. In short, Donald could care less if many people die unnecessary deaths as long as he gets re-elected. He could care less if half of the country is homeless and without healthcare as long as he gets re-elected. That is our government, he’s a disgrace to the honest good people of America and doesn’t represent our morals or national tone. He’s a delusional, egomaniacal unfortunate circumstance of the last four years.

JPL: I’ve been sheltering in place since March 13th. I haven’t seen much of anything other than delivery drivers and streaming tv.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

SM: Pandemic to politics, music is bigger than anything happening right now and always will be because it gives you the feeling of hope. Hope that you are connected to others when you love the same song. Hope that propaganda has not brainwashed everyone when lyrics speak to your heart and not the local news, hope that we are not united under the false pretense of nationalism but united in an unexplained feeling swaying at a club to the same song. The community has responded like we always do, with more music.

On a personal note, I’m feeling very creative because that is how I process stress, depression, uneasy feelings I can’t explain. It’s interesting how we all respond differently. Some of the most creative and talented people I know can’t even look at an instrument and others text me daily with the excitement of a new idea or riff. As long as we listen to what our mind and bodies want, and tell social norms to go fuck themselves, then we’ll emotionally survive a pandemic.

JPL: We are the soundtrack of this crisis. I’ve enjoyed watching all the live streams. It’s a great time to get weird.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

SM: Right now someone you know is suffering because they can’t pay their bills or because they are really lonely, try to think of who that is and help them.

JPL: Find your tribe and keep them alive. It’s a once-in-a-century plague event. Enjoy it.

JM: As a band, we most probably won’t be playing any shows in a long time… but as friends, we are lifers. We three are lucky and hope others have the same.

https://www.brumeband.com/
https://brumesf.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/brumeband/
http://brume.bigcartel.com/
http://store.merhq.com
http://magneticeyerecords.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MagneticEyeRecords

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