Quarterly Review: Witchcraft, The Wizar’d, Sail, Frank Sabbath, Scream of the Butterfly, Slow Draw, Baleful Creed, Surya Kris Peters, Slow Phase, Rocky Mtn Roller

Posted in Reviews on July 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

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Day Three is always special when it comes to Quarterly Reviews because it’s where we hit and pass the halfway point on the way to covering 50 albums by Friday. This edition hasn’t been unpleasant at all — I’ve screened this stuff pretty hard, so I feel well prepared — but it still requires some doing to make it all come together. Basically a week’s worth. Ha.

If you haven’t found anything yet that speaks to you, I hope that changes either today, tomorrow or Friday.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

Witchcraft, Black Metal

witchcraft black metal

Four years ago, Are you seeking for Essay Writing Useful Sentences services? EssayGator serve as the best platform for students who need assistance from highly skilled experts. Witchcraft frontman/founder Hire Dissertation Writers today to give yourself the best chance of getting into your first choice university or college. You can trust our reliable service Magnus Pelander released a solo album under his own name called When Students in the UK Come Across a Hectic Essay, They are Likely to Ask, see it here and Make it Easy for Me to Impress My Professor? Time (review here) as a quick complement to the band’s own 2016 offering, do my math homework websites The go done with all my homeworks legal resume bar admission Nucleus (review here). can someone write me an essay essays to receive online how to do a outline for a essay mba admission essay editing Pelander‘s BBB's Business Review for Dzooles Chemistry Help For Students, Business Reviews and Ratings for Dzooles Dissertation Consulting in Sugar Hill, GA. Time was his first solo outing since a 2010 four-song EP that, for a long time, seemed like a one-off. Now, with Are you looking for best http://bcn.uprrp.edu/trash/?essay-writing-service-ratings? Our experts and proofreaders are available 24/7. Proofreading and editing both included in a single fee! Black Metal, Kidnapped Zacharie who can Alberto Passalacqua Phd Thesis. Culver City Middle School serves 6-8th grade students and is part of Culver City Unified School do my Witchcraft strips down to its barest essentials — click From Best Dissertation Writing Services UK. best-uk-dissertation.com offers is the custom dissertation writing service UK Pelander‘s voice and guitar — and he is the only performer on the seven-track/33-minute LP. Style-wise, it’s mostly sad, intimate folk, as The Honest to Goodness Simple fact on Qualified College Essays Starting With Quotes What Is Important To Do to discover more regarding Specialized Essay Posting Pelander begins with “Elegantly Expressed Depression” and tells the stories of “A Boy and a Girl,” “Sad People,” and even the key-inclusive “Sad Dog” before “Take Him Away” closes out with a bluesy guitar figure that features twice but is surrounded by a space that seems to use silence as much as music as a tool of its downer presentation. The title, obviously tongue-in-cheek, is clearly nonetheless a reference to depression, and while Why Are Crime Rates In The United States Comparatively High - Stop receiving bad grades with these custom research paper advice Dissertations, essays and academic papers of best Pelander‘s performance is gorgeous and honest, it’s also very clearly held down by a massive emotional weight. So too, then, is the album.

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Nuclear Blast webstore

 

The Wizar’d, Subterranean Exile

the wizar'd subterranean exile

Making their debut on Professional essay writing service uk discount code that you can trust. Choose us and evaluate the benefits: affordable price, full confidentiality, 24/7 Cruz Del Sur Music, Australia’s Find out the pros of hiring the best read thising service and how it can help you achieve your goals. The Wizar’d return from the doomliest of gutters with EssayWritersWorld.com is a Doctor Essay we offers essay writing service at our clients our uk essay writing company is the best one Subterranean Exile, opening the album with the title-track’s take on capital-‘c’ Classic doom and the pre-NWOBHM-ism of Place a "write my essay" order and get online academic help from cheap http://www.cghc.edu.ph/?college-essay-moving-to-america. 24/7 Non-plagiarized essay writer help from /paper Pagan Altar, Witchfinder General, and, duh, Black Sabbath. In just 35 minutes, the four-piece make the most of their raw but epic vibes, using the means of the masters to showcase their own songwriting. This is doom metal at its most traditional, with two guitars intertwining riffs and leads on “Master of the Night” and the catchy “Long Live the Dead,” but there’s a dungeon-style spirit to the solo in that track — or maybe that’s just build off of the prior interlude “Ecstatic Visions Held Within the Monastic Tower” — that sets up the speedier run of “Evil in My Heart” ahead of the seven-minute finale “Dark Fortress.” As one might hope, they cap with due lumber and ceremony befitting an LP so thoroughly, so entirely doomed, and while perhaps it will be seven years before they do another full-length, it doesn’t matter. The Wizar’d stopped time a long time ago.

The Wizar’d on Thee Facebooks

Cruz Del Sur Music website

 

Sail, Mannequin

Sail Mannequin

A follow-up to their later-2019 single “Starve,” the three-song Mannequin release from UK progressive metallers Sail is essentially a single as well. It begins with the ‘regular’ version of the track, which careens through its sub-five minutes with a standout hook and the dual melodic vocals of guitarists Tim Kazer and Charlie Dowzell. This is followed by “Mannequin [Synthwave Remix],” which lives up to its name, and brings bassist Kynan Scott to the fore on synth, replacing the drums of Tom Coles with electronic beats and the guitars with keyboards. The chorus works remarkably well. As fluidly as “Mannequin” fed into the subsequent remix, so too does “Mannequin [Synthwave Remix]” move directly into “Mannequin [Director’s Cut],” which ranges past the seven-minute mark and comes across rawer than the opening version. Clearly Sail knew they could get some mileage out of “Mannequin,” and they weren’t wrong. They make the most of the 16-minute occasion and keep listeners guessing where they might be headed coming off of 2017’s Slumbersong LP. Easy win.

Sail on Thee Facebooks

Sail on Bandcamp

 

Frank Sabbath, Compendium

Frank Sabbath Compendium

They’re not kidding with that title. Frank Sabbath‘s Compendium covers four years of studio work — basic improvisations done in 2016 plus overdubs over time — and the resulting freakout is over an hour and a half long. Its 14 component pieces run a gamut of psychedelic meandering, loud, quiet, fast, slow, spacey, earthy, whatever you’re looking for, there’s time for it all. The French trio were plenty weird already on 2017’s Are You Waiting? (review here), but the scales are tipped here in the extended “La Petite Course à Vélo” (11:16) and “Bermuda Cruise” (17:21) alone, never mind on the Middle Eastern surf of “Le Coucous” or the hopping bass and wah of “Gallus Crackus” and “L’Oeufou.” The band has issued live material in the past, and whatever they do, it’s pretty jammy, but Compendium specifically highlights this aspect of their sound, shoving it in front of the listener and daring them to take it on. If you’re mind’s not open, it might be by the time you’re done.

Frank Sabbath on Thee Facebooks

Frank Sabbath on Bandcamp

 

Scream of the Butterfly, Birth Death Repeat

scream of the butterfly birth death repeat

Scream of the Butterfly made a raucous debut in with 2017’s Ignition (review here), and Birth Death Repeat stays the course of bringing Hammond organ to the proceedings of melodically arranged ’90s-style heavy rock, resulting in a cross-decade feel marked by sharp tones and consistency of craft that’s evident in the taut executions of “The Devil is by My Side” and “Higher Place” before the more moderately-paced “Desert Song” takes hold and thickens out the tones accordingly. ‘Desert,’ as it were, is certainly an influence throughout, as the opener’s main riff feels Kyuss-derived and the later “Driven” has a fervent energy behind it as well. The latter is well-placed following the ballad “Soul Giver,” the mellower title-track interlude, and the funky but not nearly as propulsive “Turned to Stone.” They’ll soon close out with the bluesy “I’ve Seen it Coming,” but before they do, “Room Without Walls” brings some marked solo shred and a grungier riff that scuffs up the band’s collective boot nicely, emphasizing that the record itself is less mundane than it might at first appear or the title might lead one to believe.

Scream of the Butterfly on Thee Facebooks

Scream of the Butterfly on Bandcamp

 

Slow Draw, Gallo

Slow Draw Gallo

From minimalist drone to experimental folk, Slow Draw‘s Gallo sets a wide-open context for itself from the outset, a quick voice clip and the churning drone of “Phase 2” leading into the relatively straightforward “No Words” — to which there are, naturally, lyrics. Comprised solely of Mark Kitchens, also known for drumming in the duo Stone Machine Electric, Slow Draw might be called an experimentalist vehicle, but that doesn’t make Gallo any less satisfying. “No Words” and “Falling Far” and the just-acoustic-and-voice closer “End to That” serve as landmarks along the way, touching ground periodically as pieces like the strumming “Harvey’s Chair” and the droned-out “Industrial Aged” play off each other and “Angelo” — homage to Badalamenti, perhaps — the minimal “A Conflict” and “Tumoil” [sic] and “Playground” tip the balance to one side or another, the penultimate krautdrone of “Phase 1” unveiling perhaps what further manipulation turned into “Phase 2” earlier in the proceedings. At 33 minutes, Gallo feels careful not to overstay its welcome, and it doesn’t.

Slow Draw on Thee Facebooks

Slow Draw on Bandcamp

 

Baleful Creed, The Lowdown

baleful creed the lowdown

Belfast’s Baleful Creed present a crisp 10 tracks of well-composed, straightforward, doom-tinged heavy rock and roll — they call it ‘doom blues boogie,’ and fair enough — with their third long-player, The Lowdown. They’re not pretending to be anything they’re not and offering their sounds to the listener not in some grand statement of aesthetic accomplishment, and not as a showcase of whatever amps they purchased to make their sound, but instead simply for what they are: songs. Crafted, honed, thought-out and brought to bear with vitality and purpose to give the band the best representation possible. Front-to-back, The Lowdown sounds not necessarily overthought, but professional enough to be called “cared about,” and whether it’s the memorable opening with “Mr. Grim” or the ’90s C.O.C. idolatry of “Tramalamapam” or the strong ending salvo of “End Game,” with its inclusion of piano, the mostly-subdued but swaggering “Line of Trouble” and the organ-topped closer “Southgate of Heaven,” Baleful Creed never veer too far from the central purpose of their priority on songwriting, and neither do they need to.

Baleful Creed on Thee Facebooks

Baleful Creed on Bandcamp

 

Surya Kris Peters, O Jardim Sagrado

Surya Kris Peters O Jardim Sagrado

Though he’s still best known as the frontman of Samsara Blues Experiment, Christian Peters — aka Surya Kris Peters — has become a prolific solo artist as well. The vinyl-ready eight songs/37 minutes of O Jardim Sagrado meet him in his element, bringing together psychedelia, drone and synthesizer/keyboard effects to convey various moods and ideas. As with most of the work done under the Surya Kris moniker, he doesn’t add vocals, but the album wants nothing for expression just the same, whether it’s the Bouzouki on “Endless Green” or the guest contribution of voice from Monika Saint-Oktobre on the encompassing 11-minute title-track, which would be perfect for a dance hall if dance halls were also religious ceremonies. Experiments and explorations like “Celestial Bolero” and “Saudade” bring electric guitar leads and Mellotron-laced wistfulness, respectively, while after the title-cut, the proggy techno of “Blue Nebula” gives way to what might otherwise be a boogie riff on closer “Southern Sunrise.” Peters always seems to find a way to catch the listener off guard. Maybe himself too.

Surya Kris Peters on Thee Facebooks

Surya Kris Peters on Bandcamp

 

Slow Phase, Slow Phase

slow phase slow phase

A strong if raw debut from Oakland three-piece Slow Phase, this 39-minute eight-tracker presents straight-ahead classic American heavy rock and roll in the style of acts like a less garage The Brought Low, a looser-knit Sasquatch or any number of bands operating under the Ripple Music banner. Less burly than some, more punk than others, the power trio includes guitarist Dmitri Mavra of Skunk, as well as vocalist/bassist Anthony Pulsipher of Spidermeow and vocalist/drummer Richard Stuverud, the rhythm section adding to the blues spirit and spiraling manic jangle of “Blood Circle.” Opener “Starlight” was previously issued as a teaser single for the album, and stands up to its position here, with the eponymous “Slow Phase” backing its strength of hook. “Psychedelic Man” meanders in its lead section, as it should, and the catchy “Silver Fuzz” sets up the riotous “Midnight Sun” and “No Time” to lead into the electric piano of “Let’s Do it Again (For the First Time),” which I’d kind of take as a goof were it not for the righteous jam that finishes it, referencing “Highway Star” during its fadeout. Some organizing to do, but they obviously know what they’re shooting for.

Slow Phase on Thee Facebooks

Slow Phase on Bandcamp

 

Rocky Mtn Roller, Rocky Mtn Roller

rocky mtn roller rocky mtn roller

This band might actually be more cohesive than they want to be. A double-guitar four-piece from Asheville, North Carolina, with a connection to cult heroes Lecherous Gaze via six-stringer Zach Blackwell — joined in the band by guitarist Ruby Roberts, bassist Luke Whitlatch and drummer Alex Cabrera — they’re playing to a certain notion of brashness as an ideal, but while the vocals have a drunk-fuckall stoner edge, the construction of the songs underlying is unremittingly sound on this initial EP. “Monster” opens with a welcome hook and “When I’m a Pile” sounds classic-tinged enough to be a heavy ’70s nod, but isn’t so easily placed to a specific band as to be called derivative. The longest of the four cuts at 5:30, “Bald Faced Hornet” boasts some sting in its snare sound, but the Southern heavy push at its core makes those dueling solos in the second half all the more appropriate, and closing out, “She Ran Off with the Dealer” has both charm and Thin Lizzy groove, which would basically be enough on their own to get me on board. A brazen and blazing candidate for Tee Pee Records‘ digital annex, if someone else doesn’t snag them first.

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Rocky Mtn Roller on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Horisont, Ahab, Rrrags, Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs, Earthbong, Rito Verdugo, Death the Leveller, Marrowfields, Dätcha Mandala, Numidia

Posted in Reviews on July 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-qr-summer-2020

Well, I’m starting an hour later than I did yesterday, so that’s maybe not the most encouraging beginning I could think of, but screw it, I’m here, got music on, got fingers on keys, so I guess we’re underway. Yesterday was remarkably easy, even by Quarterly Review standards. I’ve been doing this long enough at this point — five-plus years — that I approach it with a reasonable amount of confidence it’ll get done barring some unforeseen disaster.

But yesterday was a breeze. What does today hold? In the words of Mrs. Wagner from fourth grade homeroom, “see me after.”

Ready, set, go.

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Horisont, Sudden Death

horisont sudden death

With a hefty dose of piano up front and keys throughout, Gothenburg traditionalist heavy rockers Horisont push retro-ism into full-on arena status. Moving past some of the sci-fi aspects of 2017’s About Time, Sudden Death comprises 13 tracks and an hour’s runtime, so rest assured, there’s room for everything, including the sax on “Into the Night,” the circa-’77 rock drama in the midsection of the eight-minute “Archeopteryx in Flight,” and the comparatively straightforward seeming bounce of “Sail On.” With cocaine-era production style, Sudden Death is beyond the earlier-’70s vintage mindset of the band’s earliest work, and songs like “Standing Here” and the penultimate proto-metaller “Reign of Madness” stake a claim on the later era, but the post-Queen melody of “Revolution” at the outset and the acoustic swing in “Free Riding” that follows set a lighthearted tone, and as always seems to be the case with Horisont, there’s nothing that comes across as more important than the songwriting.

Horisont on Thee Facebooks

Century Media website

 

Ahab, Live Prey

ahab live prey

Scourge of the seven seas that German nautically-themed funeral doomers Ahab are, Live Prey is their first live album and it finds them some five years removed from their last studio LP, The Boats of the Glen Carrig (review here). For a band who in the past has worked at a steady three-year pace, maybe it was time for something, anything to make its way to public ears. Fair enough, and in five tracks and 63 minutes, Live Prey spans all the way back to 2006’s Call of the Wretched Sea with “Ahab’s Oath” and presents all but two of that debut’s songs, beginning with the trilogy “Below the Sun,” “The Pacific” and “Old Thunder” and switching the order of “Ahab’s Oath” and “The Hunt” from how they originally appeared on the first record to end with the foreboding sounds of waves rolling accompanied by minimal keyboards. It’s massively heavy, of course — so was Call of the Wretched Sea — and whatever their reason for not including any other album’s material, at least they’ve included anything.

Ahab on Thee Facebooks

Napalm Records website

 

Rrrags, High Protein

rrrags high protein

Let’s assume the title High Protein might refer to the fact that Dutch/Belgian power trio Rrrags have ‘trimmed the fat’ from the eight songs that comprise their 33-minute sophomore LP. It’s easy enough to believe listening to a cut like “Messin'” or the subsequent “Sad Sanity,” which between the two of them are about as long as the 5:14 opener “The Fridge” just before. But while High Protein has movers and groovers galore in those tracks and the fuzzier “Sugarcube” — the tone of which might remind that guitarist Ron Van Herpen is in Astrosoniq — the stomping “Demons Dancing” and the strutter “Hellfire,” there’s live-DeepPurple-style breadth on the eight-minute “Dark is the Day” and closer “Window” bookends “The Fridge” in length while mellowing out and giving drummer/vocalist Rob Martin a rest (he’s earned it by then) while bassist Rob Zim and Van Herpen carry the finale. If thinking of it as a sleeper hit helps you get on board, so be it, but Rrrags‘ second album is of unmitigated class and straight-up killer performance. It is not one to be overlooked.

Rrrags on Thee Facebooks

Lay Bare Recordings website

 

Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs, Viscerals

pigs pigs pigs pigs pigs pigs pigs viscerals

There’s stoner roll and doomed crash in “New Body,” drone-laced spoken-word experimentalism in “Blood and Butter,” and post-punk angular whathaveyou as “Halloween Bolson” plays out its nine-minute stretch, but Viscerals — the third or fourth Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs album, depending on what you count — seems to be at its most satisfying in blowout freak-psych moments like opener “Reducer” and “Rubbernecker,” which follows, while the kinda-metal of “World Crust”‘s central riff stumbles willfully and teases coming apart before circling back, and “Crazy in Blood” and closer “Hell’s Teeth” are more straight-up heavy rock. It’s a fairly wide arc the UK outfit spread from one end of the record to the other — and they’re brash enough to pull it off, to be sure — but with the hype machine so fervently behind them, I have a hard time knowing whether I’m actually just left flat by the record itself or all the hyperbole-set-on-fire that’s surrounded the band for the last couple years. Viscerals gets to the heart of the matter, sure enough, but then what?

Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs on Thee Facebooks

Rocket Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Earthbong, Bong Rites

Earthbong Bong Rites

Kiel, Germany’s Earthbong answer the stoner-sludge extremity of their 2018 debut, One Earth One Bong (review here), with, well, more stoner-sludge extremity. What, you thought they’d go prog? Forget it. You get three songs. Opener “Goddamn High” and “Weedcult Today” top 15 minutes each, and closer “Monk’s Blood” hits half an hour. Do the quick math yourself on that and you’ll understand just how much Earthbong have been looking forward to bashing you over the head with riffs. “Weedcult Today” is more agonizingly slow than “Goddamn High,” at least at the beginning, but it builds up and rolls into a pace that, come to think of it, is still probably slower than most, and of course “Monk’s Blood” is an epic undertaking right up to its last five minutes of noise. It could’ve been an album on its own. But seriously, if you think Earthbong give a shit, you’re way off base. This is tone, riff and weed worship and everything else is at best a secondary concern. Spend an hour at mass and see if you don’t come out converted.

Earthbong on Thee Facebooks

Earthbong on Bandcamp

 

Rito Verdugo, Post-Primatus

rito verdugo post-primatus

No doubt that at some future time shortly after the entire world has moved on from the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be a glut of releases comprised of material written during the lockdown. Peruvian four-piece Rito Verdugo are ahead of the game, then, with their Post-Primatus four-song EP. Issued digitally as the name-your-price follow-up to their also-name-your-price 2018 debut, Cosmos, it sets a 14-minute run from its shortest cut to its longest, shifting from the trippy “Misterio” into fuzz rockers “Monte Gorila” (which distills Earthless vibes to just over three minutes) and “Lo Subnormal” en route to the rawer garage psychedelia of “Inhumación,” which replaces its vocals with stretches of lead guitar that do more than just fill the spaces verses might otherwise be and instead add to the breadth of the release as a whole. Safe to assume Rito Verdugo didn’t plan on spending any amount of time this year staying home to avoid getting a plague, but at least they were able to use the time productively to give listeners a quick sample of where they’re at sound-wise coming off the first album. Whenever and however it shows up, I’ll look forward to what they do next.

Rito Verdugo on Thee Facebooks

Rito Verdugo on Bandcamp

 

Death the Leveller, II

Death the Leveller II

Signed to Cruz Del Sur Music as part of that label’s expanding foray into traditionalist doom (see also: Pale Divine, The Wizar’d, Apostle of Solitude, etc.), Dublin’s Death the Leveller present an emotionally driven four tracks on their 38-minute label debut, the counterintuitively titled II. Listed as their first full-length, it’s about the same length as their debut “EP,” 2017’s I, but more important is the comfort and patience the band shows with working in longer-form material, opener “The Hunt Eternal,” “The Golden Bough” and closer “The Crossing” making an impression at over nine minutes apiece — “The Golden Bough” tops 12 — while “So They May Face the Sun” runs a mere 7:37 and is perhaps the most unhurried of the bunch, playing out with a cinematic sweep of guitar melody and another showcase for the significant presence of frontman Denis Dowling, who’s high in the mix at times but earns that forward position with a suitably standout performance across the record’s span.

Death the Leveller on Thee Facebooks

Cruz Del Sur Music website

 

Marrowfields, Metamorphoses

marrowfields metamorphoses

It isn’t surprising to learn that the members of Fall River, Massachusetts, five-piece Marrowfields come from something of an array of underground styles, some of them pushing into more extreme terrain, because the five songs of their debut full-length, Metamorphoses, do likewise. With founding guitarist/main-songwriter Brandon Green at the helm as producer as well, there’s a suitably inward-looking feel to the material, but coinciding with its rich atmospheres are flashes of blastbeats, death metal chug, double-kick and backing growls behind the cleaner melodic vocals that keep Marrowfields distinct from entirely traditionalist doom. It is a niche into which they fit well on this first long-player, and across the five songs/52 minutes of Metamorphoses, they indeed shapeshift between genre elements in order to best serve the purposes of the material, calling to mind Argus in the progressive early stretch of centerpiece “Birth of the Liberator” while tapping Paradise Lost chug and ambience before the blasts kick in on closer “Dragged to the World Below.” Will be interesting to see which way their — or Green‘s, as it were — focus ultimately lies, but there isn’t one aesthetic nuance misused here.

Marrowfields on Thee Facebooks

Black Lion Records on Bandcamp

 

Dätcha Mandala, Hara

datcha mandala hara

Dätcha Mandala present a strong opening salvo of rockers on Hara, their second album for MRS Red Sound, before turning over to all-out tambourine-and-harp blues on “Missing Blues.” From there, they could go basically anywhere they want, and they do, leading with piano on “Morning Song,” doing wrist-cramp-chug-into-disco-hop in “Sick Machine” and meeting hand-percussion with space rocking vibes on “Moha.” They’ve already come a long way from the somewhat misleading ’70s heavy of opener “Stick it Out,” “Mother God” and “Who You Are,” but the sonic turns that continue with the harder-edged “Eht Bup,” the ’70s balladry of “Tit’s,” an unabashed bit o’ twang on “On the Road” and full-on fuzz into a noise freakout on closer “Pavot.” Just what the hell is going on with Hara? Anything Dätcha Mandala so desire, it would seem. They have the energy to back it up, but if you see them labeled as any one microgenre or another, keep in mind that inevitably that’s only part of the story and the whole thing is much weirder than they might be letting on. No complaints with that.

Dätcha Mandala on Thee Facebooks

MRS Red Sound

 

Numidia, Numidia

Numidia Numidia

If you’ve got voices in your band that can harmonize like guitarists James Draper, Shane Linfoot and Mike Zoias, I’m not entirely sure what would lead you to start your debut record with a four-minute instrumental, but one way or another, Sydney, Australia’s Numidia — completed by bassist/keyboardist Alex Raffaelli and drummer Nathan McMahon — find worthy manners in which to spend their time. Their first collection takes an exploratory approach to progressive heavy rock, seeming to feel its way through components strung together effectively while staying centered around the guitars. Yes, three of them. Psychedelia plays a strong role in later pieces “Red Hymn” and the folky “Te Waka,” but if the eponymous “Numidia” is a mission statement on the part of the five-piece, it’s one cast in a prog mentality pushed forward with poise to suit. Side A capper “A Million Martyrs” would seem to draw the different sides together, but it’s no minor task for it to do so, and there’s little sign in these songs that Numidia won’t grow more expansive as time goes on.

Numidia on Thee Facebooks

Nasoni Records website

 

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Bunny Racket Posts “Rock Like an Animal” Video; New Album Being Mixed

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

bunny racket

Submitted for your approval or whatever, I humbly give you the following lyrics to Bunny Racket‘s final verse of “Rock Like an Animal”:

Rock like an animal
Shake your head, jump around
Rock like an animal to that sound
Rock like an animal
Rock like an animal, it’s easy to do
Rock like an animal the whole day through

Got all that? Cool. Because I want you before you click play on the video below to imagine The Ramones singing them. You can do it, right?

Cool. Now imagine Chuck Berry — or, to be more timely, Little Richard — singing them. You can do that too, right? Of course.

Now imagine a dude from Australia in a giant rabbit suit and a patch-laden battle fest singing them in a quarry while someone in a bear costume (the bear has featured in other videos; it’s not out of nowhere) dances on top of rocks and kids and the three-piece Bunny Racket band all jump around and do various animal-themed dance moves. Jump like a kangaroo, stomp like an elephant, creep like a pussycat.

I submit the genius of what King Bunny and Company do is that he doesn’t dumb down rock and roll for a child audience, he takes the very root of what’s always been righteous about rock — its ability to move the listener; “it’s got a good beat and you can dance to it” — fuzzes it up and repurposes it to suit the all-out fun being had. The toddler in my household requests Bunny Racket‘s “Woolly Mammoth on a Motorcycle” video daily. I haven’t shown him this one yet, but you can bet your ass it’s going on the playlist. It’s a fandom we can share.

Bunny Racket‘s next album is currently in the mixing stage and though of course everything’s up in the air, I’d imagine a release sometime before the end of the year isn’t unreasonable. When I see more, I’ll let you know.

Enjoy the clip:

Bunny Racket, “Rock Like an Animal” official video

Rock Like An Animal! (filmed and edited by Byron Video and graded by Billy Wychgel)

The latest video from Bunny Racket is up on our YouTube channel!

Check it out and share it on.

More Rock than a rock quarry!

Bunny Racket is here to rock you. Whether you are 3 or 103 years old, you will not be able to resist the beautiful madness of King Bunny and his gang of fluffy punk rock friends.

With a line-up featuring members of The Vines, Goons Of Doom and Wolfmother, Bunny Racket serves up real rock’n’roll for everybody. So get loose, get nostalgic and get into it… because it truly is on for young and old.

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Bunny Racket on Instagram

Bunny Racket on YouTube

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Review & Track Premiere: Comacozer & Vinnum Sabbathi, Here and Beyond Split LP

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on May 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Comacozer Vinnum Sabbathi Here and Beyond

Preorders are up now for Here and Beyond, the new split LP between Sydney, Australia’s Comacozer and Mexico City, Mexico’s Vinnum Sabbathi. Issuing through Tasmanian imprint Psychedelic Salad Records, the release carries just three tracks, comprising Comacozer‘s sprawling 19-minute “Sun of Hyperion” and two companion pieces from Vinnum Sabbathi on side B, “HEX IV: Cassini’s Last Breath” (6:50) and “HEX V: X-15 Research Project” (9:55). If the pairing seems odd on paper given the disparate geography, in context it’s not actually much of a surprise the bands would be aware of each other, considering the international nature of the underground, social media, and bands being listeners as well as creators in a noted style.

That style as it plays out across Here and Beyond is a marked take on instrumental heavy psychedelia with roots in stoner rock jamming and a sense of purpose beyond simply that. Both groups use samples to provide a human voice — for Comacozer, the introductory drift of “Sun of Hyperion” comes accompanied by obscure dialogue about LSD, while Vinnum Sabbathi‘s live-recorded “HEX” tracks are laced with what sounds mission control communications and clips snagged from the public domain. “HEX” is an ongoing series for the trio/four-piece (depends on the show, I think) and these tracks arrive on the heels of their recently-issued Of Theories and Dimensions full-length on Stolen Body Records and a late-2019 live three-songer that featured other “HEX” pieces en route to their stated goal of 16 total. Comacozer, meanwhile, issued their fourth album, Mydriasis (review here), last summer.

It’s noteworthy of course that Vinnum Sabbathi are continuing a series that at this point dates back five years to their 2015 split with Bar de Monjas (review here), because Comacozer are as well. A 10-minute cut called “Helios Hyperion” featured on their 2014 Sessions EP and “Sun of Hyperion” — one suspects the use of “sun” there is a play on the horror-genre convention of “son of…” as well as the actual translation of “helios” — revises that formative jam. The central guitar figure, languid and building across the first half of the piece, is roughly the same as that which defined “Helios Hyperion” and if anything the feel of “Sun of Hyperion” is that Comacozer took the demo and fleshed it out across a broader reach.

It still keeps its foundation but uses it to spread itself farther out into the spaciousness and the spaciness of its own making, and is all the more hypnotic for both the reach and depth it conjures along the way. While it was recorded at the same time as Mydriasis, it works entirely as a standalone on side A of Here and Beyond, emphasizing a bit of both sides of the title in a way that Vinnum Sabbathi have no problem answering back with their two inclusions, though for their shorter runtimes, “HEX IV: Cassini’s Last Breath”  and “HEX V: X-15 Research Project” are obviously more contained in themselves.

They also utilize samples to a broader degree than did “Sun of Hyperion,” lacing them throughout the proceedings rather than just at the start. “Cassini’s Last Breath” hits its mark — as did the Comacozer track — near its halfway point, and takes off with its full weight accordingly, rolling out a huge-sounding crunch with no hesitation, then recedes as the sample returns with a post-script congratulating the NASA crew on Cassini’s accomplishments. In terms of incorporating the samples and recording live, the timing is exceptional enough that one wonders if the samples weren’t overlaid later, but it’s certainly possible that the band timed it out during the tracking process, whether it was with hand signals or just playing together with headphones on.

As “Cassini’s Last Breath” lolls toward its end, there’s a final push of volume, but it’s just a few hits that fade soon enough, naturally bringing to mind the cut communication from the satellite named in its title. Though the voice describing it sounds remarkably like Keith Carradine, the X-15 was a real research aircraft, meant for high speeds and altitudes, and the sample Vinnum Sabbathi use comes from a documentary clip about it that one can find easily enough on archive.org. There are other voices throughout the piece, but by then the band have launched a flight of their own, lumbering out the progression that defines the piece without looking back. They hold to it well, as Comacozer did to “Sun of Hyperion,” and it’s not until after seven minutes in that they seem willing to meander elsewhere, the drums still anchoring that initial crash that propelled them forward.

But the first finish is a fake-out, as Vinnum Sabbathi surge to life again in the last minute-plus of “HEX V: X-15 Research Project,” with a faster, more urgent burst than Here and Beyond has yet presented in its 39-minute course. They end with a sudden flash of feedback and are gone in a snap — not quite mach six, but it gets the message across.

From the beginning trance induced by Comacozer to that somewhat blindsiding shove from Vinnum SabbathiHere and Beyond is a journey that should be familiar enough to the experienced heads who will take it on, but that doesn’t necessarily make it any less enjoyable. As both groups maintain a sense of control over the proceedings — at least as much as they want to — they’re able to bring the listener along with them on their outward course, and whether they’re mourning for Cassini or celebrating the star of another world, their complementary nature comes through in the split in a way that emphasizes the strengths of each. It’s an easy one to dig if you’re up for the digging.

Below, to mark the occasion of preorders going live from Psychedelic Salad, you’ll find the premiere of Comacozer‘s “Sun of Hyperion,” along with the album info and one of the two Vinnum Sabbathi contributions (previously posted).

Please enjoy:

Comacozer, “Sun of Hyperion” official premiere

“Here & Beyond” a split Album between Comacozer (Sydney) and Vinnum Sabbathi (Mexico) coming on May 20th on digital and on vinyl format via Psychedelic Salad Records (Tasmania).

Australian heavy psychedelic space rockers Comacozer are back, this time with a new nineteen-minute journey that continues on from their debut track, ‘Helios Hyperion’, written and recorded in 2014. A regular feature of their live shows, ‘Sun of Hyperion’ was recorded at the same time as their last album, ‘Mydriasis’ and therefore sees them operating as a four-piece once again. As is always the case with Comacozer, this track will take you exactly where you need to go, this time in the comfort of your own
home – perfect for the current climate!

These two new tracks from Mexico’s Vinnum Sabbathi form part of the band’s HEX series, from the Base 16 or hexadecimal numeral system. The goal is to write 16 HEX songs in total for split collaborations such as this. Musically-speaking, HEX IV is quite different to the band’s usual approach – a relatively short song with little distortion – while HEX V sees a return to their classic riffing. Just like every other track in the HEX series, both songs were recorded in a single take, with only samples being added in later.

Pre orders go live on May 14th

1. Sun of Hyperion (Comacozer)
2. HEX IV: Cassini’s Last Breath (VS)
3. HEX V: X-15 Research Project (VS)

Art by Six. D. Six
Mastered by Kent Stump at Crystal Clear Sound

Vinnum Sabbathi, “HEX IV: Cassini’s Last Breath”

Comacozer on Thee Facebooks

Comacozer on Instagram

Comacozer on Bandcamp

Vinnum Sabbathi on Thee Facebooks

Vinnum Sabbathi on Instagram

Vinnum Sabbathi on Bandcamp

Psychedelic Salad Records webstore

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Black Trillium Post “Haunted Oceans” Video; The Fatal Shore out Now

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

black trillium

In my never-ending bid to not be egregiously behind on the whathaveyou quotient of any given day, news and such, I got this note a little bit ago from Sydney, Australia’s Black Trillium, whose dark, darker, darkest debut album, The Fatal Shore, was released at the end of last month. At five tracks and 39 minutes, it’s a surprisingly consumable bit of deathly-doom, and though so many of its points of inspiration — you don’t need me to list the names if you’re reading this, I’m sure — have a tendency toward overstatement, Black Trillium‘s relative expediency of purpose is an asset working in their favor. Add that to atmosphere, progressive-style patience and a willingness to be unremittingly grim in atmosphere and, well, you got yourself some quality death-doom.

If you don’t feel up to taking on the whole record, they’ve got a video for “Haunted Oceans” streaming now. Both are at the bottom of this post. Dig if you dig:

black trillium the fatal shore

Sydney’s doom/death act, Black Trillium unleash their debut album ‘The Fatal Shore’.

‘The Fatal Shore’ is available to order now via the duo’s Bandcamp and through all the major online outlets

Jump in now and take a hit from their latest video clip for the track “Haunted Oceans”

While there may only be 5 songs within Black Trillium’s debut album, coming in at 39 minutes in length, this epic voyage covers a lot of ground. The opening track ‘Conviction’ instantly descends upon the listener with dark meaty riffs, thunderous drums & bass driving right into deep powerful growls letting you know you have just stepped into new surroundings. As the track moves along the dynamics change through a display of riffs, clean & angry vocals, lead guitars and soaring choruses to completely dropping away into mellow acoustic guitars offering a false sense of security before opening back up to the darkness. Running out with menacing guitars and vocals reminiscent of the screams from a psych ward, Conviction sets the stage for what’s to follow through the next 29 minutes of audio.

“The Fatal Shore” and all of its tracks are inspired by Australia’s dark convict history and follows a prisoner arriving in Australia and the displacement that occurs. When going through the album’s song titles Conviction, Banished, Diseased, Haunted Oceans & The Fatal Shore, and then listening to the lyrics being sung one really does get the sense of a story being told throughout the album. These are not just a bunch of songs placed together but a well-crafted and laid out journey which really engages and draws the listener in.

The band have not only captured a story but have placed themselves in the shoes of those who had been banished to a new land, but while writing they also visited various sites around the country including a convict cemetery in Port Macquarie and penal sites on Cockatoo Island to Port Arthur in Tasmania – all to get a true sense of the despair experienced by all those who were imprisoned.

Overall, The Fatal Shore is littered with tonnes of powerful dark chunky riffs crossing between death, doom & sludgy type vibes intertwined with sections of clear open atmospheric acoustic guitars blended into moments of black metal, blast beats, and all the while combining together the aggressive & clean vocals stylings provided by both of the album’s creators, Zach Carlsson & Simon Skipper.

If you’re a fan of bands like My Dying Bride, Paradise Lost, Celtic Frost & Agalloch then ‘Black Trillium’ should definitely be in your hit list…

Black Trillium is:
Simon Skipper (guitar, vocals)
Zachary Carlsson (vocals, bass)
with
David Schneider (drums)

https://www.facebook.com/BlackTrilliumBand
https://www.instagram.com/black_trillium/
https://blacktrillium.bandcamp.com/

Black Trillium, “Haunted Oceans” official video

Black Trillium, The Fatal Shore (2020)

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Copper Feast Records Announces Hidden Noise Wildfire Benefit Compilation out Friday

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 25th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

In case you’ve forgotten how the world works, reality isn’t polite enough to wait for one global crisis to end before the next one begins, and though the media cycle spotlight worldwide may have moved on to brighter, shinier travesties, the fallout from Australia’s wildfires earlier this year is still being felt and will be for many years to come. Ecosystem damage like that doesn’t disappear in a day. Particularly when humans are involved. We suck at that stuff. Good destroyers, bad rebuilders.

Anyhoo, there are those who do what they can, and among them stand organizations like WIRES and the Australian Red Cross, who are the beneficiaries of Copper Feast Records‘ new compilation out March 27, titled Hidden Noise. Australia’s one-of-a-kind environment and wildlife can’t be replaced, or cloned by futures usses, and the planet needs that ecosystem and those animals now. And not to mention the cost to humanity too in lost homes, livelihoods and lives. If a comp with killer tracks by killer bands gets any dollars — Australian or otherwise — to those causes, then that’s only a good thing.

So here’s the info:

various artists hidden noise

Copper Feast Records – ‘Hidden Noise’ Charity Compilation

The world is on fire. Australia is on fire. Things will not get better until things change.

In late 2019 and early 2020, Australia was ravaged by bushfires which have destroyed vast expanses of its unique natural environment, pushing some species to the verge of extinction and causing the loss of many lives, livelihoods and homes. As our way of giving back, 100% of the profits from ‘Hidden Noise’ will be going to charity.

50% will be going to WIRES (www.wires.org.au)
50% will be going to The Australian Red Cross (www.redcross.org.au)

‘Hidden Noise’, a compilation from Copper Feast Records, showcases unreleased tracks from some of the best ‘hidden’ psych rock and stoner rock bands that Australia has to offer. In addition, a small number of previously released tracks from even more amazing bands completes the compilation.

Some of the artists that have contributed brand new songs include Planet of the 8s, Turtle Skull and The Black Heart Death Cult. We also have new mixes of existing tracks from the likes of Sleeping Giant and Narla.

The compilation title ‘Hidden Noise’ takes on a variety of different meanings in relation to this project. These are all Australian bands that are massively deserving of a greater following than they currently receive. Their music may be somewhat hidden for now, but I urge you to explore them all further. Albums, singles and even demos can be found on each band’s own Bandcamp page with links provided below.

‘Hidden Noise’ also references how at-risk persons and families have found their voice lost when requiring assistance before and after the bushfire crisis affecting the country. This is in addition to the vast number of wildlife voices that go unheard at this time as humans exploit their habitats causing their destruction.

Last but not least, the compilation title is in reference to the media obstruction and government inaction all over the world regarding climate change and the crisis affecting not only Australia, but every country in the world as a result of this.

We need change. Please enjoy the music and be a part of it.

narlamusic.bandcamp.com
theroyalartillery.bandcamp.com
planetofthe8s.bandcamp.com
turtleskullmusic.bandcamp.com
sonsofzoku.bandcamp.com
theblackheartdeathcult.bandcamp.com
cosmosmelbourne.bandcamp.com
numidia.bandcamp.com/releases
motemelbourne.bandcamp.com
theivoryelephant.bandcamp.com
footmelb.bandcamp.com
droiddoom.bandcamp.com
paulholden.bandcamp.com
sleepinggiantband.bandcamp.com

Thank you to all the artists above for their contribution and support to this project. Thank you to Carl Saff for ensuring such a broad-ranging sound compiled into one record sounds cohesive. Thank you to you, the listener, for your support.

https://copperfeastrecords.bigcartel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/CopperFeastRecords/
https://copperfeastrecords.bandcamp.com/

Foot, The Balance of Nature Shifted (2020)

Sleeping Giant, Sleeping Giant (2019)

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Child Post New Single “Free & Humble”; Announce Soul Merda LP

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 26th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

child

Lest one be accused of burying the lede, heavy blues rockers Child are doing dates in their native Australia this week with UK garage-doom forerunners Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats. That’s a damn good show, but it’s not a show I’ll be fortunate enough to see, so you’ll pardon me if my self-involved self is more taken with the release of the new single “Free and Humble” from the Melbourne-based trio and the accompanying word of a third long-player, Soul Merda, of which it’s serving as a first four-minute taste. Sign me right up, and if you don’t know why immediately, just listen to the track.

Child haven’t brought out anything but classic-groove right-on-ness since their 2013 self-titled (discussed here), and if you caught wind of that LP, its 2016 follow-up, Blueside (review here), or their 2018’s I EP (review here), you already know that fact well. I’ll assume you have, and therefore turn you over as quickly as possible to the info and the new song, with the thought that, if you saw the headline that said “new Child track,” you’re probably not reading this shit anyway. And fair enough.

So here you go:

child free and humble

CHILD – Free & Humble

The wait is over! Australia’s premier heavy blues act CHILD have surprised us with the first single titled “Free and Humble” from their much anticipated third LP “Soul Merda”. The band have been on a short break since September 2019 and have announced that this album “will be the last from the CHILD you know”. It is not known whether this means the band is expanding, changing direction creatively or returning to the mothership. We do know that this is the beginning of an exciting new path for the band and listeners alike. Remember to stay “Free and Humble.”

Recorded to 2 inch tape by Nao Anzai at Head Gap Studios, Preston Victoria
Mixed and Mastered by Nao Anzai at Rolling Stock Studios, Collingwood Victoria.

“Ball and Chain” artwork by Les Elefant

CHILD Live with UNCLE ACID AND THE DEADBEATS:
Feb. 28 The Brightside Brisbane
Mar. 01 Factory Theatre Sydney
Mar. 03 Max Watts Melbourne
Mar. 04 The Gov Adelaide

CHILD is:
Mathias Northway – Vocals/Guitar
Michael Lowe – Drums/Percussion
Danny Smith – Bass Guitar

https://www.facebook.com/childtheband
https://www.instagram.com/childtheband/
http://www.childtheband.com
https://childtheband.bandcamp.com
https://www.youtube.com/childtheband
http://kozmik-artifactz.com/artist/child/

Child, “Free and Humble”

Child, I EP (2018)

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Foot Premiere “Green Embers” from The Balance of Nature Shifted out May 1

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on February 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

foot

Foot release their third album, The Balance of Nature Shifted, on May 1 through Copper Feast Records. The follow-up to the Melbourne-based progressive heavy rocking four-piece’s 2018 LP, Buffalo, it comprises a nine-track and 46-minute run conjured seemingly at the songwriting behest of guitarist/frontman Paul Holden, whose resonant vocal harmonies are an essential characteristic of the band’s approach that have never sounded so full or lush as they do here. Whether it is in the pastoralism of later “Manic Progression” or the full-on riff-fueled push of “Despair on Hope Street” and “E-Sports” at the outset, it’s an Alice in Chains comparison well earned as Holden singly brings together both sides of the Staley/Cantrell dynamic that once set an entire generation of rockers singing from the bottom of their mouth, while somehow retaining an identity of his own throughout.

The wall of fuzz surrounding his voice, from his own guitar as well as that of Dave Pemberton and the thickened tonality of bassist Shaun Stolk, is satisfyingly rich and remains so across The Balance of Nature Shifted, but with drummer Jack Eddie punctuating their undulations and the next chorus never too far off, the listener doesn’t at all get lost in the wash. Foot find a rare balance between aesthetic and craft so as to build on the identity they began to forge on their 2016 self-titled and hold to a largely similar purpose while realizing their form to a new degree of effectiveness and scope. Even the high-low guitar chug interplay on “Break the Altar (Light Shade)” and the solo that caps the three-and-a-half-minute “Ride it Out” tie into this sense of who Foot are and the complexity of the sonic mission they’ve undertaken to best serve their own material.

foot the balance of nature shiftedThey succeed in that outright, and it’s difficult to imagine a form of The Balance of Nature Shifted that is more realized than that which the band present. As “Green Embers” shifts from its moody beginning into the sheer largesse of riff that takes hold, lurching in a way that seems to immediately contradict the first two tracks before it, there’s nonetheless a sense of continuity and unfolding that takes place on the LP as a whole, a flow that continues in “Ride it Out” and the (I-wish-)pop(-was-this)-tinged centerpiece “Investment,” as Foot find room for added dynamic in volume trades for what’s their longest cut at 6:28. The only other piece that touches six minutes is closer “High,” which sets its foundation in the blend of melogrunge and fuzzgaze — or was that melogaze and fuzzgrunge? — that has been at the core of the proceedings all along, but patiently digs in its heels and offers one final look at the world the band have created throughout, melodic and encompassing, but hardly serene or still.

Movement can be found underneath “High,” as in even the comparatively minimal “Neighbours,” and as there to some degree is across the entire span, but Foot provide a sure guiding hand — pun absolutely intended — and let the structures of their songs do the work they’re supposed to do in terms of carrying the audience from one end to the other, front to back. Vinyl release will be later in the year, but in linear, digital form, The Balance of Nature Shifted casts an immersive totality of an impression, its melodies and harmonic accomplishment working as a distinguishing factor that’s only bolstered by the thoughtful perspective and rhythmic push surrounding, and even as its title and cover art hint at nature rising to undo the various efforts (which isn’t to say horrors) wrought by humanity, it reminds that there is still beauty to be found in a world of seemingly endless violence and decay.

There is more than an edge of psychedelia to Foot‘s songwriting, but that doesn’t come at the expense of craft, and isn’t necessarily primary to the band’s purpose. Rather, it feeds into the atmosphere of the songs themselves even as it emerges from the attention to detail that’s given to tone, to the methodical execution of pace, and the vibrant melodicism showcased in Holden‘s echoing layers of voice. Thus it becomes another element of the progressiveness of their take overall, rather than simply exploration for its own sake — though of course nothing against that either, and certainly in listening to Buffalo and Foot, the band are nothing if not willful in their forward creative evolution. The Balance of Nature Shifted bears the fruit of that mindful engagement.

It’s my pleasure to host the premiere of “Green Embers.” Please find it on the player below, followed by some comment from Holden on the track and more release info from the PR wire.

And please enjoy:

Paul Holden on “Green Embers”:

In relation to the musical side of “Green Embers,” I think around that point I had been listening to a lot of My Sleeping Karma for inspiration on different sonic textures and in particular, the world music characteristics contained in their songs. I approached the intro of the song with these concepts in mind.

The remainder of the song is a pretty straightforward fuzz rock song. I recorded the heavy riff through an Earthquaker Devices Hoof V2 Fuzz Pedal straight into a Sovtek head. I have always dug the contrast of a heavy riff combined with a clean harmonised vocal sound. You don’t always have to go hard with your vocal even if the band are going hard.

Lyrically, I wrote the tune after reading about the findings of a royal commission into the misconduct of the four biggest banks in Australia. It confirmed what we pretty much already knew which is multinational banks are completely fucking corrupt. It’s that unbridled greed thing, which remains a pretty obvious message throughout the rest of the record too.

‘The Balance of Nature Shifted’ is the follow-up to Foot’s acclaimed second album ‘Buffalo’ and is due for release digitally May 1 2020 with a vinyl release slated for August.

Foot take their well-honed desert rock sound one step further on ‘The Balance of Nature Shifted’, with songs going harder than they ever have before on a Foot record. Fans that were on board for their self-titled debut and follow-up ‘Buffalo’ are sure to be satisfied while newer audiences will love this classic blend of Queens of the Stone Age meets Alice in Chains.’

NOTE: Copper Feast Records will be releasing The Balance of Nature Shifted as a double vinyl later in mid-2020, featuring vinyl exclusive bonus tracks and demos from the recording process.

Foot are:
Paul Holden (Vox, Guitar)
Dave Pemberton (Guitar)
Shaun Stolk (Bass)
Jack Eddie (Drums)

Foot on Thee Facebooks

Foot on Bandcamp

Copper Feast Records on Thee Facebooks

Copper Feast Records on Instagram

Copper Feast Records on Bandcamp

Copper Feast Records BigCartel store

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