Quarterly Review: JOY Feat. Dr. Space, Rosetta, Pendejo, Lightsabres, Witch Hazel, CBBJ, Seedium, Vorrh, Lost Relics, Deadly Sin (Sloth)

Posted in Reviews on March 22nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

quarterly-review-spring-2019

Day Five. What would traditionally be the end of the Quarterly Review if going to six wasn’t the new going to 11. Whatever, I can hack it. The amount of good stuff included in these batches really helps. I’m not saying there are days that are a flat-out bummer, but I feel like the proportion of times in this Quarterly Review I’ve gone, “Wow, this is pretty awesome,” has seen a definite spike this time around. I won’t complain about that. Makes the whole thing fun.

Today will be no exception, and then we finish up on Monday with the last 10. Thanks for reading if you do.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

JOY Feat. Dr. Space, Live at Roadburn 2018

joy feat dr space live at roadburn 2018

Brought together as part of the ‘San Diego Takeover’ at Roadburn 2018 that featured a host of that city’s acts performing in an even broader host of contexts, JOY and Scott “Dr. Space” Heller of Øresund Space Collective took the stage at the tiny Cul de Sac near the very end of the festival. It was how I closed out my Roadburn (review here). Dr. Space did a short spoken introduction and then they were off and they didn’t look back. The centerpiece of the limited LP is an extended jam simply titled “Jam.” It’s edited on the platter, but the digital version has the full 54 minutes, and the more the merrier. They round out with takes on Road‘s “Spaceship Earth” and JOY‘s “Miles Away,” and those are cool too, but the real highlight is about halfway through the longer “Jam” when the drums kick into the next gear and you suddenly snap out of your trance to realize how far you’ve already come. And you’re still only at the midpoint. I don’t know. Maybe you had to be there. So be there.

Øresund Space Collective on Thee Facebooks

JOY on Thee Facebooks

JOY Feat. Dr. Space at Øresund Space Collective Bandcamp

 

Rosetta, Sower of Wind

rosetta sower of wind

Philadelphia-based post-whatever-you-got outfit Rosetta continue to set their own terms with Sower of Wind, a self-recorded four-track/half-hour offering that’s something of an outgrowth of their most recent album, Utopioid. Broken into four tracks each assembled from ideas and layers churning throughout the four sections of that record, it brings out the ambient side of the band as guitarist/keyboardist/bassist Matt Weed serves as engineer for “East,” “South,” “West” and “North” as he, guitarist/keyboardist Eric Jernigan and vocalist Mike Armine — who here just adds samples and noise — construct fluid soundscapes that can either build to a head, as on “East” or offer a sense of foreboding like “West” and “North,” depending solely on the band’s will. It’s intended as an exploration, and it sounds like one, but if that wasn’t the point, Sower of Wind probably wouldn’t have been released in the first place. It’s not at all their first ambient release, but this modus continues to be viable for them creatively.

Rosetta on Thee Facebooks

Pelagic Records webstore

 

¡Pendejo!, Sin Vergüenza

pendejo sin verguenza

Whatever your current working definition might be for “over the top,” chances are Pendejo — also stylized as the exclamatory ¡Pendejo! — will make short work of it. Sin Vergüenza, their third long-player, sees release through their own Chancho Records imprint, and it’s not through opener “Don Gernàn” before the Amsterdam-based outfit break out the horns. Fronted by El Pastuso, who supplies the trumpet, the band roll through dense toned heavy rock in a crisply-executed, high-energy 10 tracks and 40 minutes that, even when you think they’re letting up, on the later “El Espejo,” they still manage to burst out a massive riff and groove in the second half. It’s the kind of record that’s breathtaking in the sense of you’re trying to run to keep up with its energy. That, however, should not be seen as undercutting the value of the band’s songwriting, which comes through regardless of language, and whether it’s the start-stops of “La Mala de la Tele” or the gleeful weirdo push of “Bulla,” Pendejo have their sonic terrain well staked out and know how to own it. They sound like a band who destroy live.

Pendejo on Thee Facebooks

Pendejo webstore

 

Lightsabres, A Shortcut to Insanity

LIGHTSABRES A SHORTCUT TO INSANITY

It’s rare for an artist to grow less predictable over time, but Lightsabres mastermind and multi-instrumentalist John Strömshed hits that standard with his former one-man outfit. Joined by session drummer Anton Nyström, Strömshed brings forth 11 tracks of genre-bending songcraft, melding fuzz and progressive folk, downer rock and thoughtful psych, garage push with punker edge, and seemingly whatever else seems to serve the best interests of the song at hand. On “Born Screaming,” that’s a turn to classical guitar plucking sandwiched on either side by massive riffs and vocals, like that of “Tangled in Barbed Wire,” remind of a fuzz-accompanied take on Life of Agony. At just 36 minutes, A Shortcut to Insanity isn’t long by any means, but it’s not an easy album to keep up with either, as Strömshed seems to dare his listenership to hold pace with his shifts through “Cave In,” rolling opener and longest track (immediate points) “From the Demon’s Mouth” and the sweetly melodic finale “Dying on the Couch,” which is perhaps cruelest of all for leaving the listener waiting for the other shoe to drop and letting that tension hang when it’s done.

Lightsabres on Thee Facebooks

DHU Records webstore

 

Witch Hazel, Otherworldly

Witch Hazel Otherworldly

Classic-style doom rockers Witch Hazel shift back and forth between early metal and heavy rock on their second full-length, Otherworldly, and the York, Pennsylvania, four-piece of vocalist Nate Tyson, guitarist Andy Craven, bassist Seibert Lowe and drummer Nicholas Zinn keep plenty of company in so doing, enlisting guest performances of organ and other keys throughout opener “Ghost & the Fly” and “Midnight Mist” and finding room for an entire horn section as they round out 11-minute closer “Devastator.” Elsewhere, “Meat for the Beast” and “Drinking for a Living” marry original-era heavy prog with more weighted impact, and “Zombie Flower Bloom” plays out like what might’ve happened if mid-’80s Ozzy had somehow invented stoner rock. So, you know, pretty awesome. The strut and shuffle of “Bled Dry” adds a bit of attitude late, but it’s really in cuts like the title-track and the aforementioned “Midnight Mist” earlier on that Witch Hazel showcase their formidable persona as a group.

Witch Hazel on Thee Facebooks

Witch Hazel on Bandcamp

 

CBBJ, 2018 Demo

CBBJ 2018 Demo

To a certain extent, what you see is what you get with CBBJ‘s 2018 Demo, right down to the wood paneling on the cover art. The band’s name — also written as CB/BJ — would seem to be taken from its members, Cox (that being Bryan Cox, founding drummer of Alabama Thunderpussy), Ball, Bone, and Jarvis, and as they look toward a Southern Thin Lizzy on demo finale “The Point of it All,” there’s something of a realization in what they’re putting together. It’s four tracks total, and finds some thrust in “Wreck You,” but keeps it wits there as well as in the sleazier nod of “The Climb” that precedes it as the opener and even in the penultimate “Can’t Go Home,” which gives booziest, earliest AC/DC a treatment of righteous bass. They’re apparently in the studio again now, or they just were, or will, or won’t, or up, or down, but whatever. Point is it’ll be worth keeping an ear out for when whatever comes next lands.

CBBJ on Thee Facebooks

CBBJ on Bandcamp

 

Seedium, Awake

seedium awake

Go on and get lost in the depths of Seedium‘s debut three-songer, Awake. The Polish outfit might be taking some cues as regards thickness from their countrymen in Dopelord or Spaceslug, but their instrumental tack on “Mist Haulers,” “Brain Eclipse” and “Ruina Cordis” oozes out of the speakers with right-on viscosity and comes across as infinitely stoned. The centerpiece tops 11 minutes and seems to indicate very little reason they couldn’t have pushed it another 10 had they so desired, and through “Ruina Cordis” is shorter at a paltry 7:08, its blasted sensibility and ending blend of spaciousness and swirl portends good things to come. With the murky first impression of “Mist Haulers” calling like a prayer bell to the riff-worshiping converted, Seedium very clearly know what they’re going for, and what remains to be seen is how their character and individual spin on that develops going forward. Still, for its tones alone, this first offering is a stunner.

Seedium on Thee Facebooks

Seedium on Bandcamp

 

Vorrh, Nomads of the Infinite Wild

vorrh nomads of the infinite wild

Programmed drumming gives Nomads of the Infinite Wild, the debut release from the Baltimore duo of Zinoosh Farbod and John Glennon an edge of dub, but the guitar work of songs like “Mercurial,” looped back on itself with leads layered overtop and Farbod‘s echoing vocals, remains broad, and the expansive of atmosphere puts them in a kind of meditative post-doom feel. Opener “Myths” strikes as a statement of purpose, and as “Morning Star” shows some Earth influence in the spaces left by Glennon‘s guitar, the band immediately uses that nuance to craft an individual identity. “Flood Plane” saunters through its instrumental trance before getting noisy briefly at the finish, only to let “These Eyes” work more effectively through a similar structure with Farbod on keys, seeming to set up the piano-foundation of “Ancient Divide,” which closes. This is a band who will benefit greatly from the fact that they record themselves, because they’ll have every opportunity to continue to experiment in the studio, which is exactly what they should be doing. In the meantime, Nomads of the Infinite Wild effectively heralds their potential for aesthetic innovation.

Vorrh on Thee Facebooks

Vorrh on Bandcamp

 

Lost Relics, 1st

lost relics 1st

Well, they didn’t call it 1st because it’s their eighth album. Denver noise rock trio Lost Relics debut with the aptly-titled 18-minute four-songer, bringing Neurosis-style vocal gutturalism to riffy crunch more reminiscent at times of Helmet‘s discordant heyday. Dense tonality and aggression pervade “Dead Men Don’t Need Silver,” “Scars,” the gets-raucous-later “Whip Rag” and closer “Face Grass,” which somehow brings a Clutch influence into this mix, and even more somehow makes it work, and then even more somehow indulges a bit of punk rock. The vocals and sense of tonal lumber tie it all together, but Lost Relics set a pretty wide base for themselves in these tracks, leaving one to wonder how the various elements at work might play out over the course of a longer release. As far as a debut EP goes, then, that’s the whole point of the thing, but something seems to be saying Lost Relics have more tricks up their sleeve than they’re showing here. One looks forward to finding out if that’s the case.

Lost Relics on Thee Facebooks

Lost Relics on Bandcamp

 

Deadly Sin (Sloth), VII: Sin Seven

deadly sin sloth vii sin seven

Deadly Sin (Sloth) play the kind of sludge that knows how well and truly fucked we are. The kind of sludge that doesn’t care who’s president because either way the chicken dinner you’re cooking is packed full of hormones. The kind of sludge that well earns its Scott Stearns tape artwork. VII: Sin Seven is not at all void of melody or purpose, as “Ripping Your Flesh” and the Danziggy “Glory Bound Grave” grimly demonstrate, but even in those moments, its intent is abrasion, and even the slower march of “Icarus” seems to scathe as much as the raw gutterpunk in “F One” and opener “Exit Ramp”‘s harshest screams. Not easy listening. Not for everybody. Not really for people. It’s a malevolent bludgeoning that even in the revivalism of “Blood Bought Church” seems only to be biding its time until the next strike. It does not wait all that long.

Deadly Sin (Sloth) on Thee Facebooks

Deadly Sin (Sloth) on Bandcamp

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday Full-Length: Mühr, Messiah

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 2nd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

If you have headphones handy, go ahead and put them on. I’ll wait.

I’ve now false-started this post three times. That’s a lot. Usually, one, two at the outside. Three false starts — a sentence or two deep, then scrap, start over — means I’m having legitimate trouble framing a discussion of something, and when it comes to Messiah (review here), the lone full-length by Amsterdam-based cosmic doomers Mühr, I take it as a sign of how continually affecting I find the record. I’m closing out this week with it in part because it’s November, which means that we’re officially in the wind-down on 2018 (whew) and somehow I couldn’t let the year pass without marking a half-decade since this album’s release. Comprised of just a single track running 47 minutes, it was released on vinyl through Canardian Records and is as close to a perfect execution of weighted-soul psychedelia as I’ve heard. From the opening bassline to its many drones and swirls and explorations, the song “Messiah” operates on its own level entirely and five years later I’ve yet to hear a piece that captures a sense of majesty in the same way. I know it’s not the highest-profile outing that’s ever closed out a week around here, but I really do consider this one of the best records of the decade.

If you’ve never heard it before, the best advice I can give you is to be patient. Mühr certainly are. It’s nearly five minutes into the total stretch before one realizes the song has started, and longer still before the build that’s underway is really processed. Think of it as a stellar object in rotation. It’s moving, but that motion isn’t immediately apparent to the naked eye. Mühr‘s initials-only lineup included guitarists IJV and GW, drummer HH and bassist/vocalist ZALX also adds vocals to “Messiah” and FA keys, and there’s apparently a three-note sample of Ornette Coleman somewhere in there, but I won’t pretend to know where — and the flow they’re able to hone throughout the piece is graceful to the point of being balletic. Vocals arrive gently ahead of the first of two surges of volume. I won’t spoil it by giving the time stamp, but there’s a soft tension being build in the early going of the track and much teasing before it actually happens, flourish of harmonized Mühr, Messiahvocals somehow only adding to that. Knowing it’s coming makes it somewhat easier, but when that hugeness of tone finally takes hold it’s absolutely gotta-make-it-louder glorious; a consuming wash the likes of which I’ve rarely heard. Yes, I mean it. Listen for the little bit of feedback. That’s your clue that it’s arrived. And as the drums crash out a slow procession and one guitar scorches while the other holds together the rhythm with the bass — neither of them separate from the rest of the proceedings melodically, by the way — the space created is vast and expands the context of the rest of the outing that follows. About 10 and a half minutes total have passed before the drums cease their march for now, and the residual noise recedes gradually in a chaotic flurry of noise that somehow becomes lost-time hypnotic, the rumble of the low end, the melee of effects and the sort of swelling drones continuing the bear the heft of the volume that came before. It’s an aftermath, and one well earned, but it also becomes its own movement, and something I said about Messiah at the time and very much stand by is that these stretches and especially the long movement of noise at the end of the track are pivotal to its overall success.

There’s a second push no less gorgeously executed. At 15 minutes or so, the drums return to bring everything back to ground, and the bass progression locks step almost immediately to begin the next stage of the march. Again, it’s subtle, and so fluid, and so easy to get lost in, but it’s happening, and over the next few minutes, the vocals come back as an ethereal presence and soon lead the way into a bit of foreboding circa 20:30, and shortly thereafter the guitars lurch back and unleash the next voluminous cascade. Feedback and effects noise play out to accompany the central riff over the slowly churning drums and as it passes its halfway point, “Messiah” moves into a next stage of its loudest, most active manifestation. Then the real fun starts. At 27 minutes, things are quiet again, but the drums and bass are still holding the same pattern. The most affecting stretch of vocals happens almost a minute and a half later. Two quick (in the grand scheme of the piece itself), soulful verses obviously intended as a showcase work their way into a slow-motion guitar solo, and while it’s not nearly as loud as either of the bigger surges, that’s the actual apex of “Messiah.” The moment where the band seems to lay it all out and leave everything there for the listener to digest. What follows in the remaining 17 minutes is a trace of psychedelic drone and noise, working across different, improvised-sounding stages to build on the atmosphere thus-far conjured, as though they left the tape running after the song itself had finished and then — boldly, I’d argue — realized how necessary that last stretch is to the spirit of creation that so much abounds through the entire work.

Mühr had released the Shepherd / Blood EP (discussed here) in 2010, but Messiah was another level entirely. To date, it’s one of the best examples I’ve ever heard of a band absolutely putting everything into one offering and apparently obliterating themselves in the process. Mühr played three shows. Three. I was so fortunate to be there for one of them, at the Cul de Sac in Tilburg at Roadburn 2014 (review here), and watching them onstage lit by candles playing as a five-piece is still an experience for which I’m incredibly grateful. They played “Messiah” in its entirety. It was amazing. I get a chill thinking about it.

ZA, aka Dennis Duijnhouwer, played bass concurrently in the up-and-coming Death Alley, and would appear on the first of their full-lengths but depart before the second. He and guitarist Jevin de Groot, who appeared in Mühr as GW, have a new band together called Temple Fang, who’ve played a couple shows and seem to be just getting going. Needless to say, one eagerly anticipates finding out what the future holds there.

Either way, Mühr‘s sole long-player remains an entity unto itself, and as curious as I was to know how they might follow it up, the fact that it stands alone somehow makes its place even more special. It’s not just another album or just a first album. It’s a monument.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

Is this the part where I go on and on about how tired I am? Oh, okay, good. I’m glad. We made it. I’ve had the same headache for five days.

People come and go from your life. That’s what people do. That is the nature of things. A day doesn’t last. People usually don’t last. I know a lot of people, I’m fortunate to have a wife and a son, but I don’t have a lot of friends. That’s all I want to say.

Sunday at 7PM Eastern, episode three of “The Obelisk Show” airs on Gimme Radio. It’s a special recorded at the Høstsabbat Fest I went to in Oslo earlier this month and I’ve got interviews with Ole and Jens, who run the event, as well as Elephant Tree and Asteroid, and it’s all pretty awesome. You should listen. Thanks.

And thanks too to everyone who’s bought a shirt. If that’s not you, I get it, but if it is, your support of this endeavor is massively appreciated. More than a quarter of them are gone, and they’re available here: https://dropoutmerch.com/the-obelisk

Let’s do some notes and then I’m gonna try to crash out before the baby wakes up. Subject to change blah blah here we go:

Mon.: Hibrido track premiere/review; Pale Heart video premiere.
Tue.: Sadhus review/album stream; Sergio Ch. video.
Wed.: Causa Sui review; Maybe an Elephant Rifle video premiere.
Thu.: Vinnum Sabbathi/Cegvera review/premiere; maybe Birnam Wood video.
Fri. Belzebong review.

Busy, as ever.

The Patient Mrs. has been sick all week. It’s been a lot of me and The Pecan, and while she usually has minimal work obligations on Fridays, she’s gotta be there from like 1PM until god knows when. After bedtime. It’s a lot, but he’s a good kid, so that helps. We’ll play or go to Costco or read books or whatever this afternoon and he’ll be fine. I worry about poisoning him with my own wretchedness. My shitty posture. My frowny face. I suck. Ugh.

Okay, enough of that.

Please have a great and safe weekend. I’ll stay up all the way until 9PM on Sunday to be in the Gimme Radio chat while the show is on, so thanks if you get to check that out, and please don’t forget the forum and the radio stream here as well.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

Tags: , , , , ,

Death Alley Announce Indefinite Hiatus and Last Shows

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 5th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Is this the end for Death Alley? I’d no more place a bet on it either way than I would’ve predicted where they were headed after their earlier-2018 second album, Superbia (review here), came out on Century Media. But they’re calling it hibernation and at very least stepping back for an indeterminate amount of time, so who the hell knows what will happen, and if this is it for them, I didn’t want to let it pass unmarked. If you ever got to see Death Alley live, you already know why.

The Amsterdam four-piece revitalized the idea that hard rock didn’t have to be boring or an overly commercial enterprise. On Superbia and their 2015 Tee Pee Records-released debut, Black Magick Boogieland (review here), their 2017 Live at Roadburn (review here) outing, and their sundry singles along the way dating back to their first 7″, 2014’s Over Under b/w Dead Man’s Bones (review here), they showed that heavy rock could have an edge, and that if a band has the presence, the confidence, and the songwriting ability, they can be as raw or as embellished as they want to be and still bring their audience along for the ride. It was a once-in-a-lifetime thrill to host them in 2016 at The Obelisk All-Dayer (video here) in Brooklyn, and though they were subject to lineup changes along the way, I still recall fondly the hour I spent on Skype interviewing them in 2015 for the first album. They were a total blast, front to back.

Their last shows (at least for the time being) are set for this month through January, and they’ll finish at Paradiso in Amsterdam, which I have no doubt will be an absolute blowout. Hard to imagine Death Alley would have it any other way.

Their announcement went out via the social medias as follows:

death alley (Photo by Stradlin Guitars)

Alright, wörld… After years of hypermotion, time has come for hibernation.

These final shows of our Superbia tour will be your last chance to dance with us for a while. After the 3rd of January in Paradiso, we’ll be off the radar for an indefinite period.

So you predators better not sleep on it… boogie while it lasts!

Tour dates:
13 OCT – Hengelo (NL) Beerland
17 NOV – Eindhoven (NL) Helldorado
29 NOV – Berlin (DE) Cassiopeia
30 NOV – Cottbus (DE) Zum Faulen August
01 DEC – Dresden (DE) Noteingang
13 DEC Deventer (NL) Burgerweeshuis
15 DEC Leiden (NL) Gebr. de Nobel
20 DEC Leeuwarden (NL) Neushoorn
21 DEC Bergen Op Zoom (NL) Gebouw T
22 DEC Dordrecht (NL) Bibelot
27 DEC Venlo (NL) Grenswerk
28 DEC Arnhem (NL) LuxorLive
29 DEC Uden (NL) De Pul
3 JAN Amsterdam (NL) Paradiso

DEATH ALLEY is:
Douwe Truijens – vocals
Oeds Beydals – guitar
Uno Bruniusson – drums
Sander Bus – bass

http://deathalleyband.tumblr.com/
https://www.facebook.com/deathalleyband
http://deathalley.bigcartel.com/
http://www.deathalley.nl/
http://www.centurymedia.com/
https://www.facebook.com/centurymedia

Death Alley, “Murder Your Dreams” official video

Tags: , , ,

Death Alley, Superbia: How Hungry the Lions

Posted in Reviews on March 19th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

death alley superbia

Space punk, proto-metal, heavy progressive glam and enough hooks to get you from here to Alpha Centauri — it can only be the return of Amsterdam’s Death Alley, whose 2015 Tee Pee Records debut LP, Black Magick Boogieland (review here), was a lesson in the fine art of making “heavy” sound like a party you really want to go to. The four-piece toured consistently enough after the release that they wound up trading out their rhythm section — Sander Bus for Dennis Duijnhouwer on bass and the seems-to-be-everywhere-these-days Uno Bruniusson (also Black Salvation and Procession, ex-In Solitude) for Ming Boyer — a move that left vocalist Douwe Truijens and guitarist Oeds Beydals as the remaining founders. It is no small feat for a band to trade out half its lineup from one record to the next, but, now signed to Century Media, Death Alley‘s second collection, Superbia, shows they’ve done nothing but move forward as a result of the work they’ve put in the last three years.

With the creative percussiveness of Bruniusson propelling a telltale hook like “Feeding the Lions” and Bus adding low-end complement, Beydals and Truijens both absolutely shine in a number of contexts. Whether it’s the shimmer brought to the guitar in “Headlights in the Dark” or the rawer-but-still-melodic command of Truijens‘ vocals in the three-minute “Murder Your Dreams” (video premiere here), the pair find themselves in the forward position throughout the Pieter Kloos-helmed eight-track/50-minute effort, which is as powerful in its hooks as one could possibly hope on cuts like “The Chain,” “Feeding the Lions” and the aforementioned “Headlights in the Dark,” while retaining some experimentalist edge in the progressive melodies of the penultimate “Pilgrim” and a purposeful sense of exploration in extended opener “Daemon” (9:10) and closer “The Sewage” (11:37).

It’s nearly impossible to guess how much of any sonic shift has been brought on through personnel change as opposed to naturalist or purposeful growth of Death Alley‘s songwriting, but it’s palpable when one sits Superbia alongside anything prior in Death Alley‘s catalog, whether it’s last year’s Live at Roadburn (review here), which by its very nature would be more about capturing a raw performance, or Black Magick Boogieland, or their initial 2014 single, Over Under b/w Dead Man’s Bones (review here). Strength in songwriting remains firm and makes highlights of “Headlights in the Dark,” “Shake the Coil,” nine-minute opener “Daemon” and others, and the sense of energy that’s driven them since their beginning hasn’t diminished in the slightest, as “The Chain,” “Feeding the Lions” and “Murder Your Dreams” demonstrate plainly, but even on the latter track, which is as hard-edged as Death Alley get on Superbia, one can hear their focus has changed from raw impact to more deeper melodic arrangements and a deeper sense of atmosphere on the whole, as manifest in the lush chorus of “Pilgrim” and the all-consuming summary of “The Sewage” at the finale of the record — which finds Truijens singing about “psychic sewage”; about as clever a euphemism as I’ve heard for “shit for brains.”

death alley photo lupus lindemann

The central question is does it work, and the central answer is yes, but it means Death Alley are more complex in their intentions than even those who dug deep into Black Magick Boogieland‘s spacious closer, “Supernatural Predator,” might have suspected, because the purposeful sense they give from “Daemon” is that they’re not just picking up where they left off, but using their past as a launchpad to push even further out. That they get there is what ultimately makes Superbia such a success, never mind the band’s ability to tie together disparate ideas like the jammy build of “Daemon,” the straight-ahead thrust of “The Chain” and the near-gothic strum and keys of “Shake the Coil” — lest one forget that Pieter Kloos also produced fellow Netherlanders Dool, among many others — into one complete, flowing entirety. So not only are Death Alley more complex, but they’re more realized.

Given their time on the road, this isn’t necessarily surprising, but they’re also half a new band. Still, listen to the twisting first 40 seconds of “Pilgrim,” or the weirdo break that starts 5:10 into “Feeding the Lions,” or really every single second of “The Sewage,” which stomps and struts as much as it reaches into the cosmic ether — almost an answer to “Supernatural Predator,” but not quite aiming for the same goal. To wit, the progressive harmonies circa the three-minute mark are something I simply don’t think Death Alley would’ve attempted their last time out, and it’s worth noting that as they shift into the open midsection of the track via Bruniusson‘s crashes, residual noise and foreboding riffing from Beydals and Bus, it’s the guitar that comes to lead the charge through the “21st Century Schizoid Man”-esque chase, and into the jazzy movement that follows (though that’s not to take away from the snare work there, which is fantastic), and as “The Sewage” heads toward and past the eight-minute mark, it’s Beydals‘ solo that really seems to be doing the work of summarizing the album; extended, echoing, coated in effects, poised in a way but still delivered with vitality, it puts the emphasis on just how special a player he’s emerged here as being.

Truijens returns for repeated final lines and the closer more or less works its way toward a fading oblivion. To those who heard Black Magick Boogieland, no doubt Superbia will offer more than a few surprises, and it’s plain to see that was the band’s goal all along. What they’ve managed to do is put themselves on a trajectory of progression that’s both unexpected — not to say one didn’t anticipate evolution in their approach from their first to their second album, but there are a few genuine leaps here in Truijens‘ and Beydals‘ performances and in the depth of their craft overall — and richly satisfying, especially on well-earned repeat listens. If this growth was born of touring and the tumult the band has been through in the last couple years, they’ve emerged from same sounding stronger than ever and on their way to a maturity that one finds it easy to imagine will surprise even the band in terms of its breadth and sonic impact. When Death Alley gets where they’re going, watch your ass. Superbia is another crucial forward step along their way.

Death Alley, “Murder Your Dreams” official video premiere

Superbia preorder portal

Death Alley Tumblr

Death Alley on Thee Facebooks

Death Alley webstore

Death Alley website

Century Media website

Century Media on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

Death Alley Premiere “Murder Your Dreams” Video; Superbia Due March 23

Posted in Bootleg Theater on February 13th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

death alley

Amsterdam-based heavy rockers Death Alley will release their second album, Superbia, March 23 as their debut on Century Media. The eight-track outing is rife with a progressive feel even beyond what the band brought to their 2015 Tee Pee Records first long-player, Black Magick Boogieland (review here), and no, I’m not just talking about the King Crimson-style chase scenes tucked into 11-minute closer “The Sewage.” It’s the whole record. Even as the opening push of “Daemon” seems to pick up where “Supernatural Predator” from the preceding full-length left off, it does so bringing together different sides of Death Alley‘s sound — the melody and the danger — the raw earth thrust and the outer space presence.

The four-piece have undergone a few changes death alley superbiasince Black Magick Boogieland, and even since they released Live at Roadburn (review here), vocalist Douwe Truijens and guitarist Oeds Beydals bringing in bassist Sander Bus and drummer Uno Bruniusson as their new rhythm section. No doubt that switch in personnel had a hand in the corresponding sonic shift, as it invariably would, but as the band’s new single and video “Murder Your Dreams” showcases, it’s still very much the art of crafting memorable songs that’s at the heart of what Death Alley does. With that as firmly established as it is in “Murder Your Dreams” and throughout Superbia from whence it comes, Death Alley can pretty much go wherever they like stylistically. And they do.

I’ll have more on the album closer to the release itself, but I’m thrilled today to be able to premiere the video for “Murder Your Dreams,” which you’ll find below, followed by quotes from the band and from director Luuk BouwmanDeath Alley also have tour dates booked throughout the coming months and Superbia is available to preorder at the portal in the links at the bottom of the post. Can’t miss it.

Please enjoy:

Death Alley, “Murder Your Dreams” official video premiere

DEATH ALLEY – Murder Your Dreams (OFFICIAL VIDEO). Taken from the album “Superbia”, out March 23rd, 2018.

Death Alley on “Murder Your Dreams”:

“‘Murder Your Dreams’ shows a side of our musicality that was always there but never revealed itself in our music before. Just when we needed it, The Wipers came knocking and we crushed them to bits. A bittersweet taste of Superbia in its most compact form.”

Director Luuk Bouwman on the video:

“The video is based on chase and falling dreams — which I felt would fit well with the song. I remembered a great scene in the Nightmare on Elm Street series in which the characters are stuck in a loop. So I wanted to create a nightmare-like slapstick in which the protagonist is condemned to keep falling, eternally. I was already joking that it was an autobiographical story and as if it was an ominous prophecy, a day after finishing the video I fell really hard on a bridge because of black ice. I broke my arm, cheekbone and eye socket. So last week I was in surgery to reconstruct my face.”

Death Alley live:
23-03 (DE) Cologne – Jungle (release show)
24-03 (DE) Münster – Alterna Festival
30-03 (NL) Amsterdam – SkateCafe (release show)
31-03 (NL) Schijndel – Paaspop
13-04 (NL) Eindhoven – Stroomhuis
14-04 (NL) Groningen – LOLA
26-04 (NL) Den Haag – Life I Live
28-04 (NL) Rotterdam – V11
04-05 (DE) Berlin – Desertfest
06-05 (UK) London – Desertfest
08-05 (FR) Paris – Gibus*
09-05 (FR) Nantes – Feraullier*
10-05 (ES) San Sebastian – Dabadaba*
11-05 (ES) Barcelona – Upload*
12-05 (FR) Clermont Ferrand – Camille Claudel*
13-05 (CH) Olten – Coq D’Or*
15-05 (DE) Leipzig – NATO*
16-05 (DE) Nürnberg – Stereo*
17-05 (DE) Dortmund – FZW*
18-05 (DE) Lohr am Main – Umsonst und Drinnen Festival*
19-05 (DE) Lichtenfels – Paunchy Cats*
26-05 (NL) Raalte – Dauwpop
02-06 (NL) Nijmegen – Fortarock

Superbia preorder portal

Death Alley Tumblr/

Death Alley on Thee Facebooks

Death Alley webstore/

Death Alley website

Century Media website

Century Media on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

Death Alley Sign to Century Media; New Song Posted; On Tour Now

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 16th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Heartfelt congratulations are in order for Amsterdam’s Death Alley. The four-piece, who issued their Live at Roadburn (review here) live album earlier in 2017 via Suburban Records and Tee Pee Records, have had a tumultuous year, including an unceremonious separation in April with bassist Dennis Duijnhouwer and the subsequent bringing-aboard of Sander Bus as his replacement as well as former In Solitude drummer Uno Bruniusson to join the remaining founding duo of guitarist Oeds Beydals and vocalist Douwe Truijens. The news this time is mind-blowingly good, however, as the band have signed to Century Media for the release of their next album.

Currently on tour with Kadavar, the veterans of Psycho Las Vegas 2016 — who also stopped by Brooklyn to play The Obelisk All-Dayer (video here) — released their debut, Black Magick Boogieland (review here), via Tee Pee in 2015, and aside from reaffirming once more that New York label’s tastemaker stature (let’s not forget the likes of Kadavar and Graveyard and Earthless, let alone High on Fire, are Tee Pee alums), their signing to Century Media represents the next step in an upward, forward trajectory that’s been blasting out ever since. An absolutely scorching live act, Death Alley blend space rock and heavy psych with motor-fueled charge in their studio material, and one can hear shades of both represented in the new track “The Sewage, Pt. 1,” which is streaming now at the bottom of this post.

Am I stoked at the prospect of a new Death Alley record tracked once again by Pieter Kloos (ex-35007, producer for MotorpsychoDoolBeaverMonomyth7Zuma7Celestial SeasonSpoiler, and so, so many others) at his The Void studio in Eindhoven? Well that’s kind of a stupid question. Yes I fucking am. Right onto the list of 2018’s most anticipated albums Death Alley‘s Century Media debut goes, where it will remain until I actually get to hear the thing and proclaim it one of the year’s best records (no pressure; ha). Won’t happen nearly soon enough, as far as I’m concerned.

Announcement from Century Media from the PR wire, Death Alley‘s current remaining tour dates, and of course that song stream follow here. Dig it:

death alley

DEATH ALLEY Sign Worldwide Deal with Century Media Records; Premiere New Song, “The Sewage”

Dutch destroyers DEATH ALLEY already raised attention with their debut album, “Black Magick Boogieland”, in 2015. The band, revolving around former The Devil’s Blood guitarist Oeds Beydals, singer Douwe Truijens, Swedish drummer Uno Bruniusson (ex-In Solitude) and latest addition Sander Bus on bass, mainline an unorthodox cross contamination of psychedelic hard rock and punk, played with excellent precision and power. The spirit of Bad Brains and King Crimson, Hawkwind and Poison Idea, and hints of The Stooges and Black Sabbath-worship form the fundament for DEATH ALLEY’s solid rock and roll presented with metal finesse and a pitch black psychedelic soul cherry on top.

Since their debut release, DEATH ALLEY have relentlessly toured the world. From the smallest underground venues to the bigger stages at festivals like Psycho Las Vegas, Hellfest in France, and multiple Desertfests, the band has been leaving a lasting impact with their energetic performance. Their show at the prestigious Roadburn Festival resulted in a critically acclaimed live album, released earlier this year.

The ink on their new deal with Century Media Records isn’t dry yet and they just left the Moon Studios where they recorded their sophomore album with producer Pieter Kloos (Motorpsycho, The Devil’s Blood, Dool, etc.). Right now, they are hitting the road again with their friends Kadavar with whom they release a very special tour split 7”.

“The Sewage” is also available as a digital single on all streaming and download platforms.

The band comments: “We’ve been sailing the sewage for quite a while now, and time has come to harvest the gold and offer it to you on a silver platter. We can spend much time and effort describing the feeling of the new music, the upcoming record, and the European tour with Kadavar, but that will always be just a faint shadow of showing it: so just come to the shows and blast the new song with volume at 11 – that’ll say more than the dozens of synonyms for ‘stoked’. Let us feast on it.”

DEATH ALLEY live:
KADAVAR / MANTAR / DEATH ALLEY
16.10.2017 Antwerpen (BE), Desert Fest
17.10.2017 Strassbourg (FR), La Laiterie Club
18.10.2017 Paris (FR), Le Trabendo
19.10.2017 Rennes (FR), L’Ubu
20.10.2017 Bordeaux (FR), La Krakatoa
21.10.2017 Madrid (ES), But
22.10.2017 Barcelona (ES), Bikini
24.10.2017 Lyon (FR), Feyzin
25.10.2017 Monthey (CH), Pont Rouge
26.10.2017 Aarau (CH), Kiff
27.10.2017 München (GER), Backstage
28.10.2017 Wien (AT), Flex
29.10.2017 Graz (AT), PPC
30.10.2017 Zagreb (CRO), Mocvara
01.11.2017 Budapest (HU), A38
02.11.2017 Warschau (POL), Progresja
03.11.2017 Krakau (POL), Kwadrat
04.11.2017 Prag (CZ), Nova Chmelnice
05.11.2017 Nürnberg (GER), Hirsch
07.11.2017 Amsterdam (NL), Paradiso Noord
08.11.2017 Hannover (GER), Capitol
09.11.2017 Copenhagen (DK), Pumpehuset
10.11.2017 Stockholm (SV), Debaser
11.11.2017 Oslo (NO), BLA
12.11.2017 Gothenburg (SV), Pustervik
13.11.2017 Deventer (NL), Burgerweeshuis
15.11.2017 Köln (GER), Stollwerck
16.11.2017 Wiesbaden (GER), Schlachthof
17.11.2017 Stuttgart (GER), LKA Longhorn
18.11.2017 Berlin (GER), Columbiahalle

DEATH ALLEY is:
Douwe Truijens – vocals
Oeds Beydals – guitar
Uno Bruniusson – drums
Sander Bus – bass

http://deathalleyband.tumblr.com/
https://www.facebook.com/deathalleyband
http://deathalley.bigcartel.com/
http://www.deathalley.nl/
http://smarturl.it/DeathAlleyTheSewage1
http://www.centurymedia.com/
https://www.facebook.com/centurymedia

Death Alley, “The Sewage, Pt. 1”

Tags: , , ,

Roadburn 2017 Trip, Pt. 8: Guess I’ll Go Live on the Internet

Posted in Features on April 24th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

weirdo canyon dispatch 2017

04.24.17 — 09.14 — Monday morning — Schiphol Airport Gate B15, Amsterdam

Yesterday, after the folding ritual was done for the last time for the 2017 Weirdo Canyon Dispatch, I sat for a bit in the office of the 013 by myself. I had put music on basically because it was quiet while Lee wrapped up putting stuff online and he’d gone to meet somebody, so I was on my own and it was even quieter. Sometimes you need a minute to process, or to breathe, or to do whatever it is you need to do to have your head right. That’s when I took the picture above. I knew it was going to be a long last day of Roadburn 2017, and that’s exactly what it turned out to be.

No regrets. Fond memories.

I was up before the alarm this morning. First time that’s ever happened in Tilburg for me following Roadburn. The alarm, by the way, was set for 05.45. A shuttle would be arriving at the hotel circa 06.30 to bring me to the airport. After packing and going to sleep circa 2AM, I was up between three and four and never got back to sleep. I read the recaps of what looked to have been a crappy baseball game. I checked the Times to see if the world was ending yet. I dicked around the way one does when one is just trying to eat minutes.

Speaking of eating, you should’ve seen me pouring and stirring the protein powder into my coffee on the line for the Lufthansa check-in here at Schiphol. Can’t imagine it was difficult for anyone to pick out who was the American in the crowd. With his little battery-powered stirrer like something he bought from a Sharper Image catalog circa 1991. Thing cost me $8 on Amazon. Worth every penny.

A couple Roadburn types around the airport this morning. I’m pretty sure I saw the bassist from Pallbearer going the other way while I was on the people-mover. Another dude in an Ulver t-shirt with his buddy who got the fest hoodie with the John Dyer Baizley cartoon tits on it. Sundry others.

windmillsIn about an hour, I’ll board this death-trap-looking-thing and go to Frankfurt, which if I’m not mistaken is the opposite of the direction in which I ultimately want to go. It was the same deal connecting in Toronto to come to Amsterdam in the first place. Because that’s the kind of sense Boston makes. World class, khed. Local fuckin’ sports.

I’ll hope to sleep on the plane — definitely the second if not the first — and when I land, I’ll magically have back the six hours of day I gave up so willingly last Tuesday to make the trip out. Before that happens, there are almost too many people I need to thank, so I’m going to try to do that.

First, The Patient Mrs. always. So much love. I’m so lucky. Also Walter Hoeijmakers, Becky Laverty, Lee Edwards and all involved with the Weirdo Canyon Dispatch: the amazing, humbling staff of writers that includes Sander van den Driesche, Andreas Kohl, José Carlos Santos, Kim Kelly, Guido Segers, Ben Handelman, Jamie Ludwig, Dom Lawson, Cheryl Carter and Peter van der Ploeg, the artists Cavum and Kim Holm, the photographers Paul Verhagen and Niels Vinck, as well as Jaimy, Gijs, Miranda, Rian and all behind the scene at the 013 venue. What a group we’ve assembled over the last four years. I frankly have no idea what I’ve done to earn a place among any of them except consistently fuck up. Like I say, humbling.

Thanks as well to Jens Wassmuth, Dante Torrieri, Falk-Hagen Bernshausen and all in the photo pit for their kindness and professionalism. I hadn’t shot anything in a while and it was easier to step back into that process knowing I was among the most pro-shop group of people one could ever hope to find.

I was pretty beat this year. Significantly so. I’ve got a lot on my mind. I’m about to lose my job. And there were times over the last few days where I felt like I was so out of it I wasn’t really doing justice to the experience. I tried my best. I really did. By yesterday I kind of felt like I had it right. I don’t know if I could’ve done a fifth day of Roadburn, but by the time yesterday came around I a little bit had my head back. Inclined to take what I can get.

Tomorrow will be Tuesday. I took the day off work. What’re they gonna do, fire me? I’ll make myself good coffee in the morning and a peanut butter protein shake for lunch, have a nice salad for dinner with The Patient Mrs., scritch the Little Dog Dio and get caght up on all the Obelisk stuff that’s fallen by the wayside while Tilburg happened. Lots of news to catch up on, and an interview for Wednesday and this and that. I might actually post some stuff tomorrow or I might just hold it all off. I’ve been social media-ing a lot and see the value in maybe taking a day and not. We’ll see how it plays out. I’m also going to shave my beard. Off. Gone. Done with it. Not much left by now anyway. I decided that in the van on the way to the airport this morning.

As I’ve done for the last however many years, each post in this series (minus the Hard Rock Hideout review) has derived its header title from the name of a song. They are as follows:

Trip Pt. 1: “Dos Soles” by Cavra. I got that record sent to me while I was at the airport in Boston.

Trip Pt. 2:: “Sanctuary” by Elder. A track from their new album that seemed fitting for having made it to Tilburg.

Day One Review: “Wound of the Warden” by SubRosa. Self-explanatory.

Day Two Review: “Death’s Dark Tomb” by Atala. I was arguably at my most ass-dragging and that seemed dark enough for the mood.

Day Three Review: “And Yet it Moves” by Slomatics. Like Roadburn itself, that song is so unbelievably heavy, and yet it proceeds along like the third day of a four-day fest.

Day Four Review: “God Particle” by The Doomsday Kingdom. I wanted to celebrate something rare, like this experience itself. That seemed to fit.

Trip Pt. 8: “Guess I’ll go Live on the Internet” by All Them Witches. It had been a minute since I put that record on. It’s always good for tired mornings. Plus the airport connection is absolute shit, so there’s an element of irony there too.

This will be the last post in the series, and before I bring it to an end, I want to say thank you one more time for reading. All the social media likes and shares and comments are awesome, but even just knowing that when something gets posted on this site someone might actually see it is validating beyond what I can tell you and so deeply, hugely appreciated. It’s been an interesting year and it’s going to continue to be one, but your support means a tremendous amount to me and I wouldn’t trade it for anything. So yes, thank you again. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

I’ll hope to talk soon.

All my best,
JJ Koczan

Tags: , ,

Death Alley Part Ways with Bassist Dennis Duijnhouwer

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 5th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Bummer news out of Amsterdam in that hard-driving motorpsych rockers Death Alley have announced a separation with bassist Dennis Duijnhouwer. The four-piece, who took part in last year’s The Obelisk All-Dayer (video here) in Brooklyn, recently released Live at Roadburn (review here) on Tee Pee and Suburban Records as the follow-up to their 2015 debut, Black Magick Boogieland (review here), capturing their 2016 “Death Alley and Friends” set (review here) at the venerable Netherlands-based festival. As of this post, Duijnhouwer, who was previously in cosmic doomers Mühr, has yet to comment one way or the other on the split, but anyone fortunate enough to have seen them at either of the above events, at Psycho Las Vegas or the litany of tour dates they’ve done in Europe and the US can tell you he was a significant presence on stage for the band.

In the Thee Facebooks post below, vocalist Douwe Truijens, guitarist Oeds Beydals and drummer Uno “Velcrow” Bruniusson make it official. Death Alley had shows this past weekend that were canceled and have more dates coming up throughout this month the fate of which is as yet unknown. They also recently announced a European tour this fall supporting German retro forerunners Kadavar. All live dates are included here, but I would assume plans are tentative at this point. That is, keep an eye out for more word on what’s actually happening and when.

Here’s what I know:

death alley roadburn 2016 (Photo by JJ Koczan)

As many of you may have noticed over the past few days, we have parted ways with Dennis on bass guitar. It is with much regret that it had to come to this situation, but it has become clear that a continuation would be particularly unhealthy for all involved, including the band as a whole. The challenges and pressures that come with being a band have to be borne by the group and all its individual members in order for it to function. Severe and persistent differences in dealing with those challenges and pressures, and differences in ideas of what should be done lead to stagnation. It is with undeniable gratitude for what we have achieved over the past years that we acknowledge we can’t continue with Dennis.

Although we know that many hearts (and some hearts in particular, including ours) are broken by this, and that every individual may react in his or her own way, we count on your support to pull through this.

Oeds
Douwe
Uno

P.s.: For the time being, we will keep you informed through our Facebook page only, since we don’t have control over our Instagram account.

Death Alley live:
Apr 07 OCCII Amsterdam, Netherlands
Apr 08 The Other Side Live Peer, Belgium
Apr 16 Bar Live / Le 301 Roubaix, France
Apr 17 La Scène Michelet Nantes, France
Apr 19 VOID Bordeaux, France
Apr 20 Bonberenea Tolosa, Spain
Apr 21 Funhouse Music Bar Madrid, Spain
Apr 22 Riff Ritual Fest Barcelona, Spain
Apr 24 Cluricaume Poitiers, France
Apr 27 Burgerweeshuis Deventer, Netherlands
Apr 27 De Schuit Katwijk Aan Zee, Netherlands
Apr 28 The Underworld Camden London, United Kingdom
Apr 29 Merleyn Nijmegen, Netherlands
Apr 30 Astra Kulturhaus Berlin, Germany
Jun 24 Pedro Pico Pop Raalte, Netherlands
Jul 07 MadNes Festival Nes, Netherlands
Jul 08 Dijkpop festival Medemblik, The Netherlands
Jul 21 Welcome to the Village Leeuwarden, Netherlands
Jul 23 Haltpop Assendelft, Netherlands
Aug 04 Krach am Bach Beelen, Germany
Aug 18 Nirwana Tuinfeest Lierop, Netherlands

Death Alley with Kadavar:
12.10. D Essen Zeche Carl
13.10. D Hamburg Markthalle
14.10. D Leipzig Conne island
15.10. B Antwerp Desert Fest
17.10. F Strasbourg La Laiterie Club
18.10. F Paris Le Trabendo
19.10. F Rennes L’Ubu
20.10. F Bordeaux La Krakatoa
21.10. E Madrid But
22.10. E Barcelona Bikini
24.10. F Lyon Feyzin
25.10. CH Monthey Pont Rouge
26.10. CH Aarau Kiff
27.10. D Munich Backstage
28.10. A Vienna Flex
29.10. A Graz PPC
30.10. HR Zagreb Mocvara
01.11. H Budapest A38
02.11. PL Warsaw Progresja
03.11. PL Krakow Kwadrat
04.11. CZ Prague Nová Chmelnice
05.11. D Nuremberg Hirsch
07.11. NL Amsterdam Paradiso Noord
08.11. D Hanover Capitol
09.11. DK Copenhagen Pumpehuset
10.11. S Stockholm Debaser
11.11. N Oslo Bla
12.11. S Gothenburg Pustervik
13.11. NL Deventer Burgerweeshuis
15.11. D Cologne Bürgerhaus Stollwerck
16.11. D Wiesbaden Schlachthof
17.11. D Stuttgart LKA Longhorn
18.11. D Berlin Columbiahalle

http://deathalleyband.tumblr.com/
https://www.facebook.com/deathalleyband
http://deathalley.bigcartel.com/
http://teepeerecords.com/

Tags: , , ,