Zaum, Eidolon: Magi Enlightenment (Plus Full Album Stream)

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on October 20th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster


[Click play above to stream Zaum’s Eidolon in full. Album is out Oct. 24 on I Hate Records.]

From field recordings of rain falling and birds calling to chants, throat-singing, drones and tones that ring out like bells calling one to prayer, the prevailing sense of worship in its two extended tracks comes to define Eidolon through and through. Presented across two sides — one cut per, both listed at precisely 21 minutes long — the second full-length from Moncton, New Brunswick’s Zaum arrives via I Hate Records (tape on Superbob) and is coated in a meditative vibe.

The duo showed patience a-plenty on their 2014 debut, Oracles (review here), and on the 2015 Himalaya to Mesopotamia split with Shooting Guns (review here), and “Influence of the Magi” and “The Enlightenment” fall in line stylistically with Zaum‘s prior work in their Eastern inflection and post-Om roll, but sprawl they present in Eidolon‘s 42 minutes brings the band to a new level of headphone-ready, open-consciousness expanse. Each track works to establish its atmosphere — “Influence of the Magi” in its stone-walled drone, “The Enlightenment” in birdsong and horn-esque synth — and when bassist/vocalist/sitarist Kyle Alexander McDonald (also synth) and drummer Christopher Lewis crash in on both, it’s merely an extension of the ambience they’ve already put forth.

It’s not jarring. It doesn’t surprise. It just is. That’s the level of ritual Zaum enact throughout. It’s a hypnotic sensibility distinct in some ways from psychedelia, but benefits from some of the same effects on the listener, and it becomes hard to tell just how much McDonald and Lewis are letting go here — whether the unfolding of “Influence of the Magi” is steering them or they’re steering it. One way or the other, it makes the first four minutes or so of the opener, just before McDonald‘s central bassline kicks in, all the more exciting as a setup for what follows, which in turn, does not disappoint.

Of course, once the full breadth of “Influence of the Magi” kicks in, the direction the song will ultimately take becomes clearer. Forward, and forward slowly. The layers of bass and maybe-sitar/maybe-synth, the swirling echo around the call and response vocals, and the gradual plod of Lewis‘ drums, all come together to create the impression of a march — the pilgrimage is underway. They break for a time just before 7:30 in and let the bass and drone hold sway, but it’s not long before the next chanting chorus and verse emerge. Already their trance-state has been attained, and the roll that plays out satisfyingly maintains it in both atmosphere and consistency of rhythm.

In its makeup, I guess it would be fair to call even the heavier stretches of “Influence of the Magi” drone, at least on some levels, but at its most active it moves far, far away from minimalism, even if it’s intent on returning there sooner or later. At about 12:00, Lewis and McDonald once again break, this time to a longer span of drones and chants, and they return at 14:30 with harder-hitting impact and gruff vocals — not quite growls, but definitely in a more shouting vein. The apex. It carries through a final chanting chorus and “Influence of the Magi” caps its grand span with flute sounds, more droning and residual noise on a long fade into silence.


As “The Enlightenment” begins, one can’t help but be reminded of what Montibus Communitas have been able to bring to their interpretation of psychedelic folk through the use of field recordings, birds and running water and the like, but Zaum‘s take is more foreboding almost immediately, though the pattern that emerges is ultimately familiar to “Influence of the Magi,” even if the transition from the extended intro — also arriving shortly after four minutes in — is more fluid overall. When it gets going, side B moves somewhat quicker than did side A, or at least that’s the impression, but pace doesn’t matter. Nothing matters. Give up your expectations. Quit your job and move to the forest. Build a temple by a river and spend your days naming the gods who live in the trees around you.

It’s hard to know where one element ends and another begins in “The Enlightenment.” McDonald‘s vocals are a far-back swirl of semi-spoken reverb, and one can dig through the mystic fog of incense and find bass, and of course Lewis‘ snare cuts through as it would — punctuation no less invaluable on “The Enlightenment” as it was on “Influence of the Magi” — but in terms of some of the layers and what’s synth, what’s drone, what’s chanted, what’s sitar, it becomes a challenge. I wouldn’t want to speak to Zaum‘s intent, but it seems reasonable to think that’s the idea.

The idea isn’t that the listener sits and tries to pick apart each aspect of Eidolon, one layer, one wash at a time, but that the listener does exactly the opposite and lets the album carry him or her along with it on the journey it has undertaken. “The Enlightenment” holds more tension in part for its (relative) uptick in tempo, but trades between sections of drone and heavier push, manipulated sitar taking hold as a from-the-ground-up build sets the stage for a here-and-gone crescendo, disappearing behind low end and McDonald doing a better take on Cisneros-style singing than most.

It goes only to rise again and give way again in an ebb and flow that gives way to a reemergent swirl that acts as a capstone leading to “The Enlightenment”‘s outro of sampled thunder, flute sounds (synth, most likely), and a similarly patient end as that of “Influence of the Magi,” only with a clap of thunder, rainfall and birdsong as the last thing one hears — far, far back by then — as the album finishes out. That might be Zaum‘s way of easing the turn back to conscious reality — in which things do matter, you do have expectations, and building a temple is very, very difficult — but it’s still a considerable return to make when they’re done, which speaks to the quality of immersion they proffer throughout Eidolon.

What can be heard throughout these two pieces, in the end, is Zaum actively working to establish themselves as a unit separate from their influences. They’re exploring different textures and spirits within the music and finding out what works to represent their atmospheric expression. Given the effect Eidolon can have when one gives oneself over to it willingly, I think they succeed, but I would not be surprised to find McDonald and Lewis continuing to expand their sound going forward, and look forward to the worlds they may continue to conjure.

Zaum on Thee Facebooks

Zaum on Twitter

Zaum on Bandcamp

I Hate Records website

I Hate Records on Bandcamp

Superbob Records website

Superbob Records on Bandcamp

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Abrahma Announce New Lineup; Third Album in Progress

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 20th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Parisian heavy progressive rockers Abrahma have a new lineup and a new record in the making under the working title In Time for the Last Rays of Light. Last we heard from the band, they had posted a cover of Nazareth‘s “Witchdoctor Woman” intended to be used as part of the Underdogma Records tribute compilation Go Down Fighting that has yet to materialize. Not to say it won’t; just hasn’t yet. Their last album, Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird (review here), came out in Spring 2015, and noting some personal setbacks, they’ve undergone this reworking around guitarist/vocalist/keyboardist Sebastien Bismuth and guitarist Nicolas Heller, parting ways with brothers Guillaume Colin (bass) and Benjamin Colin (drums), and bringing in new bassist Guillaume Theoden and drummer Sacha Viken to move forward.

Moving forward, as it happens, is exactly what Abrahma did with Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird, the somewhat gruesome title doing little to convey the many textures on hand throughout, unless I suppose one counts the visceral nature of their origins — the album was nothing if not from the guts. It was a considerable leap from 2012’s Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives (review here), and took a moodier approach overall while holding firm to the underlying current of songwriting that established such potential on the debut.

Stay tuned obviously for more updates from Abrahma and on In Time for the Last Rays of Light, or whatever it might finally wind up being called, as we shift into winter and ahead into 2017. These guys are always worth keeping tabs on.

Bismuth sent along the following brief word:


Abrahma welcomes two new members, Guillaume Theoden on bass and Sacha Viken on drums. We wish lots of luck to the Colin brothers for their killer new project!!

We are currently working on the new album which will go deeper in the soundscape we started to explore on Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird.

Abrahma, “Witchdoctor Woman” (Nazareth cover)

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Goya Announce Doomed Planet EP Due Oct. 30

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 19th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

This year has brought a plethora of short releases from Phoenix, Arizona, riff merchants Goya. Late in the Winter, their The Enemy EP (review here) felt like a quick turnaround from 2015’s full-length, Obelisk (review here), but as it turned out, that was just the start of it. June brought a reissue of their 2012 demo, Forever Dead, Forever Stoned, on Totem Cat, and just last month, they released a single with two Nirvana covers, Drain You b/w D-7 (review here), on limited vinyl through their own Opoponax Records. Oh yeah, and they’ve got their own hot sauce too.

Go ahead and blink and the three-piece have another EP coming. With three originals and a Marilyn Manson cover, Goya are back again with Doomed Planet on Oct. 30, once more on Opoponax. They’re also getting ready to hit the studio — same day the EP is out — for a new LP due next year called Harvester of Bongloads. Awfully motivated for a band of such apparent intake. Must be all that mind expansion paying off.

No audio yet, but the PR wire brings Doomed Planet art and details:


Goya to release new EP “Doomed Planet” October 30

Doomed Planet is the third EP from Goya, and their first original material featuring new bassist, Sonny DeCarlo. Coming out on October 30th, Devil’s Night, as a nod to the wanton destruction caused by mankind, This EP features two brand new, epic Goya tracks (“Doomed Planet”, and “Hoof and Bone”), an ambient instrumental track (“Sorrow”), and a Marilyn Manson cover (“Dogma”), continuing the nineties vibe Goya put forth recently with their two Nirvana covers.

“Hoof and Bone” was originally recorded for an upcoming animated film, but was rejected, pushing Goya to record three other tracks to release this EP. Much in the spirit of their first EP, Satan’s Fire, Goya wrote and recorded “Doomed Planet” and “Sorrow” in just a couple of days. In many ways, Doomed Planet is the spiritual successor to Satan’s Fire, using the same general themes of misanthropy and destruction, and evoking similar feelings of darkness through the music.

Doomed planet will be released digitally via Goya’s bandcamp (, and on a limited CD through Opoponax Records (

Goya will be entering the studio to record their third full length, Harvester of Bongloads on the same day that this EP is released. Harvester is set to be released digitally, on vinyl, CD and cassette during Spring 2017 through Opoponax Records.

Goya, Doomed Planet
1. Doomed Planet 09:01
2. Hoof and Bone 10:53
3. Sorrow 02:41
4. Dogma 03:09
instagram: @goyaband
instagram: @opoponaxrecords

Goya, The Enemy (2016)

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Begotten Stream Two Lost Tracks Recorded in 2001

Posted in audiObelisk on October 19th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster


Just how far ahead of their time were New York riffers Begotten? Take a listen for yourself to these two lost cuts from 15 years ago and find out. I’ve gone on at some length over the last couple years about the effect that a changing social media landscape and generational shift has had on a period of heavy rock in the late-’90s and early-’00s, so I’ll spare (most of) that, but like NYC compatriots in Atomic Number 76, Kreisor, Puny Human, M-Squad and a host of others — The Brought Low might be considered survivors — the trio Begotten were a prime example of a band about to have their time who found it cut short. Tracked in 2000 and released in 2001, their self-titled debut was the final CD to come from the groundbreaking Man’s Ruin Records, and like many of that imprint’s acts — Suplecs, MassCavity, etc. — they were left wondering what to do next when label honcho and design artist Frank Kozik pulled the plug. The record, a quality offering of post-Sleep tonal weight with flashes of New Yorker edge and more psychedelic impulses, never got the push it deserved, and they never did another. End of story.

Yes and no. The MySpace era and many of the acts who thrived in the day may have dissipated, but in the case of Begotten, before they went their separate ways, they took part in what seems to be numerous studio and taped rehearsal sessions after the album came out, and it’s from those that “Apache” and “Nomad” come. The two songs — other versions of which you can actually still find archived on their MySpace page, linked below — are presented here in somewhat raw fashion, but give credence to what I’m talking about as regards those years in general, which is to say that if it showed up in my inbox today, the work of guitarist/vocalist Matthew Anselmo, bassist/vocalist Amanda Topaz and drummer Rob Sefcik — the latter of whom would resurface years later in Brooklyn’s Kings Destroy — would fit right in.

Insert your favorite cliche about the old being the new here, but listen to Begotten lumber their way through “Apache” in the context of what bands like Monolord are doing now and I think you’ll hear the adage is easily applied. In tone and the emergent jammed-out feel of “Apache,” as well as in the more intense initial chug that follows in “Nomad” (Sefcik‘s drum intro reminding a bit of Kings Destroy‘s “Stormbreak” from their second album) before that song nears the halfway mark and gloriously spaces itself out, ne’er to return, Begotten‘s emphasis on swing and laid back heft seems prescient in hindsight.

My understanding is that Begotten might start jamming together again at some point, but whether or not that comes to fruition, the three-piece left behind a quality curio in their self-titled, the value of which extends way beyond its tertiary trivia, and “Apache” and “Nomad” show there was clearly a progression underway in their sound that, to-date, remains unrealized. Seems to me that in another 10-15 years — maybe sooner; things move quickly these days — when this era of heavy rock gets mined for reissues the way releases from 1968-1975 have been, Begotten will be more than ready for a second look, whatever else their future as a group may hold.

Sefcik offers some comment on the tracks under the player below.

Please enjoy:

Rob Sefcik on “Apache” and “Nomad”:

So if I remember correctly we went in to record these because we felt we were really hitting our stride. I’m not sure if we had any intention of releasing them at the time but they were definitely a reflection f what we were going for — music that had weight but also an earthy spirit and a sense of freedom. Keeping things super heavy but maintaining a certain loose, jammy vibe is always easier said than done, but we felt like we were getting there with these tunes.

The consensus is that they were recorded late spring/early summer 2001, about a year or so after the record was out. There was a pretty good amount of other material, at least an album or two’s worth. They were recorded in Manhattan but in true stoner rock fashion no one can remember the name…

We definitely have some other recorded material that we have not been able to locate, but I’m sure it will rear its head. For Amanda, these songs for her personally were, ‘an expression of the sublime beauty of the gut-wrenching agony of her existence at the time.’ I was just tying to have a good time, ALL the time, ha.

Begotten on Thee Facebooks

Begotten on MySpace (yup)

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Fatso Jetson and del-Toros to Release Split 7″ on Nov. 25

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 19th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Limited run split with Fatso Jetson and just about anybody would be a pretty easy sell, but they do pair surprisingly well with Dutch heavy surfers del-Toros, whose inclusion, “Die Cast,” starts out with a dice roll and comes topped with samples and reverb in kind. That’s over on the B-side, where on the front end, Fatso Jetson present “Dream Homes,” the organ-laced instrumental that could also recently be found closing off their new album, Idle Hands (review here). Since both tracks are instrumental — those samples notwithstanding — the 11-minute outing feels like it’s over even quicker than that, but each band uses their time wisely in the pursuit of their own brand of heavy rock, and if nothing else, the release reminds of how close the desert and the ocean’s waves can sometimes feel.

Preorders are up now from Shattered Platter ahead of the Nov. 25 Record Store Day Black Friday release. The PR wire has the official announcement:


Fatso Jetson/del-Toros – Record Store Day

California’s own Fatso Jetson and the Netherlands’ own del-Toros are two groups separated by continents but brought together by a sonic linear correlation of Fender powered, boulder heavy tone. Shattered Platter has documented these two together as part of a limited 7″ release to be made available in time for Record Store Day – Black Friday (November 25th, 2016).

Fatso Jetson’s track recorded and mixed with Mathias Schneeberger at Donner and Blitzen Studio in Los Angeles, CA with additional recording at Electric Lalli Land Studios in San Pedro, CA. Del-Toros track recorded at Bootleg Studios with Peter Van Elderen in Eindhoven, NL. Both tracks mastered with care and precision by Peter Lyman of Infrasonic Recordings in Los Angeles, CA and with a landscape illustrative design by Jack C. Gregory.

From the burning sands of Palm Desert, CA, the desert rock pioneers Fatso Jetson took a formula of Sabbath level heaviness and hardcore punk, expanded it by infusing jazz riffs and surf reverb. Forming in the 1990’s, they have releases on iconic US labels such as SST, Man’s Ruin, Bongload Custom, Cobraside and international heavy dealers Go Down & Heavy Psych Sounds. They have toured the United States and Europe with such groups as Kyuss, Queens of the Stone Age, The Atomic Bitchwax & Yawning Man along with being invited to play domestic and international festivals such as SXSW, Stoned From The Underground, Roadburn, and Desertfest(s) throughout Europe.

From the North Holland city of Alkmaar, surf rock dealers del-Toros combine heavy rock music and surf guitar to form one massive sound. If they were around at the time, they would have been the ideal candidates to compose the soundtrack to Russ Meyer’s Faster Pussycat! Kill !Kill !Kill! Since forming in 2008, they have released albums on European boutique labels such as Undertow Recordings and Lighttown Fidelity; this split will be their debut for the United States area. del – Toros have toured throughout the Netherlands and into Scandinavia, performing alongside Peter Pan Speedrock, Honky and The Turbo A.C’s.

Track list:
Side A: Fatso Jetson – Dream Homes
Side B: del-Toros – Die Cast

Fatso Jetson & del-Toros, Split 7″ teaser

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Worshipper, Shadow Hymns: Sowing and Reaping

Posted in Reviews on October 19th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster


The simple fact of the matter is that bands like Worshipper don’t just happen every day. Granted, I don’t think this is any of the members’ first project, but just because a player is experienced does not necessarily mean a given endeavor is going to click when other players become involved. Worshipper have not only clicked, but they’ve clicked on their first record, and they’ve clicked in such a way that the Tee Pee-delivered Shadow Hymns has felt destined to be on the best debuts of 2016 list since before it actually came out.

An anticipated debut? Not that it never happens, but like I said, it’s certainly not every day. Listening to the spacious crashes of opener “High Above the Clouds” or the NWOBHM-derived chug of “Step Behind,” which follows and fosters a momentum that continues across Shadow Hymns‘ eight-track/38-minute span, it reminds one of buying some tech product, opening the box, and having it ready to run immediately. Worshipper don’t need to charge up; there’s no assembly required. Guitarist/vocalist John Brookhouse, guitarist Alejandro Necochea, bassist/backing vocalist Bob Maloney and drummer Dave Jarvis have taken care of everything.

Working at three studios — Mad Oak, Q Division and Converse Rubber Tracks — they’ve meticulously constructed songs that thread together impulses from heavy rock and classic metal. Their native scene has already taken notice and embraced them heartily, handing them a Boston Music Award last year on the strength of their two 2015 singles, Place Beyond the Light b/w Step Behind (discussed here) and the earlier Black Corridor b/w High Above the Clouds (review here).

That’s an action I don’t disagree with — it seemed perhaps a bit premature in the way Barack Obama won a Nobel Peace Prize in 2009, when he’d been president for a matter of weeks — but Worshipper have been nominated for three more such awards in 2016, so clearly the Boston music scene agrees with itself, which it can be relied upon to do generally. As regards Worshipper, it’s right.


Four of Shadow Hymns‘ eight songs appeared on those prior singles, and while “Step Behind” and “Place Beyond the Light” and “High Above the Clouds” and “Black Corridor,” which closes, are standouts for having been issued before, the level of songwriting on “Ghosts and Breath,” “Darkness,” “Another Yesterday” and “Wolf Song” is not only consistent, but broadens an atmospheric scope that may or may not still be in development, but already sounds accomplished. “Ghosts and Breath” taps into Slayer-esque dual-leads at its outset even as it moves into one of the record’s plethora of hooks, while “Darkness” and the penultimate “Wolf Song” bring in layers of acoustic guitar (a specialty of producer Benny Grotto) for a feel bordering on gothic.

These moments of flourish come together fluidly with the gallop that emerges in “Place Beyond the Light,” united by stellar lead work from Necochea, Brookhouse‘s soulful vocals and the steady, forward drive of Jarvis and Maloney, which might be the most metallic aspect of what Worshipper do, ultimately. In its tone, Shadow Hymns is crisp without being unnatural or overproduced-sounding, but even as “Darkness” hits into its nodding chorus, the rhythm section holds to the tension of the verse before, setting up the transition to the solo section that follows. With a strong sense of structure throughout, it works. Worshipper manage their transitions within and between songs gracefully, and on a sheer level of execution, Shadow Hymns is miles ahead of what one generally expects going into a debut album.

“Having their shit together” might be Worshipper‘s most defining sonic feature at this stage. I would not guess their stylistic development is complete as of their first long-player — at least one hopes not — but for how firmly they nail down the airy spookiness of the slower “Another Yesterday” and the dynamic turns of “Step Behind,” they sound remarkably in command and sure of what they want to be doing. With an even side A/B split between “Darkness” and “Place Beyond the Light,” Shadow Hymns‘ personality is made even richer, but it remains drawn together through performance and songcraft, as well as a depth of mix that finds Brookhouse as much at home at the forefront of “Darkness” as buried under “Ghosts and Breath.”

There is room to expand the overall palette of mood — Shadow Hymns tends toward the dark in its themes and ambience — but Worshipper also put themselves in a solid position from which to enact that growth, structurally and in terms of how deftly they move between their rock-meets-metal influences, and with memorable cuts like “Step Behind,” “Ghosts and Breath,” “Place Beyond the Light,” “Another Yesterday,” “Black Corridor,” and so on, they’re working from a foundation solid enough to sustain any number of future directions. Like the best of debuts, the potential of the band in question is part of the appeal, but as noted, if this is just the start, Worshipper have already delivered.

Worshipper, Shadow Hymns (2016)

Worshipper on Thee Facebooks

Worshipper on Twitter

Worshipper on Bandcamp

Worshipper at Tee Pee Records

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DSW to Release Tales from the Cosmonaut in January

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 19th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster


Play your cards right — and by that I mean find the Bandcamp player at the bottom of this post — and you can stream a pair of new songs from DSW‘s second album, Tales from the Cosmonaut, which is out Jan. 14 on Acid Cosmonaut Records. In those two tracks, the Italian four-piece reaffirm the blend of straightforward post-Kyuss heavy rock and more languid, jammy roll that typified their 2012 self-titled debut (review here), while demonstrating as well the clear work they’ve done on their sound. When the first record came out, they were called Dust Storm Warning, but they seem to have opted firmly for the acronym instead, as the cover art and info below demonstrate.

From the PR wire:


DSW 2nd album is finally here: get ready to hear the Tales from the Cosmonaut!

After four long years, Italian stoner rockers DSW are finally ready to reveal to the world their second studio album: Tales from the Cosmonaut will be released by Acid Cosmonaut Records on January 2017. Seven brand new songs able to cover all the ranges of modern heavy psych, showing the evolution of their style, achieved also thanks to a large number of gigs supporting acts like like Elder, Mos Generator, Mutoid Man, Zippo, L’Ira del Baccano, Void of Sleep, Karl Marx was a Broker and Anuseye.

The album is available for pre-order on and it’s the first production of the label available on vinyl!

The pre-order is limited for the first 50 buyers, that will obtain:
– A hand numbered copy of the album on vinyl
– The immediate download of two tracks
– A CD copy of Dust Storm Warning, the first DSW album
– A link to download a digital copy of a special jam EP recorded during the Tales from the Cosmonaut sessions, that will be available only for this occasion
– Random bonus material, like pins and miniposters

Release date: January 14, 2017

1. Vermillion Witch
2. Classified
3. The Well
4. Mother in Black
5. Crash Site
6. El Chola
7. Acid Cosmonaut

Two songs from the album (El Chola and Acid Cosmonaut) are available for streaming on our Bandcamp page: prepare to be psychically assaulted!

Stefano “Wolf” Lombardi – Voice
Marco Papadia – Guitar
Stefano Butelli – Bass Guitar
Marco Mari – Drums

DSW, Tales from the Cosmonaut (2016)

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Borderland Fuzz Fiesta III Canceled for 2017

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 18th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Sorry to see this one go. I was fortunate enough to attend Borderland Fuzz Fiesta earlier this year in Tucson, and was very much hoping to be able to make the trip back for Borderland Fuzz Fiesta III in early 2017. The trip out, the desert itself, the low-key vibe, the quality of acts brought together by brothers Wayne and Joey Rudell — both also of Fuzz Evil, whose self-titled debut (review here) is out now — all came together awesomely this year despite some last-minute lineup shuffle, and next year’s edition was nothing if not full of promise.

Way of the world, I guess. The festival announced here last month that it would take place from Feb. 17-18 and that it would shift locations from Tucson, Arizona, to Bisbee, about an hour and a half south by car. I’ve gotten no confirmation on the specifics of Borderland Fuzz Fiesta III being canceled, the reasons for it and so on, but one imagines that the “logistic issue” cited in the official word below may have had something to do with moving the base of operation from one place to the other. Again, I don’t know that, but new places, new venues, etc., it makes sense to me. Could’ve been something else entirely.

The good news is that Wayne Rudell, who posted the below on the event page for the fest, assures they’ll return in 2018. I’ll hope to head back to the desert for it when the time comes.

Here’s the announcement:


It is with great regret that we have to cancel 2017 BFF. There was a logistic issue that we couldn’t work around. We did consider pushing it back a few months, but Joey and I felt it would compromise the integrity of the standard of show we strive to present. BFF will be back in full speed in 2018. Until then keep it fuzzy! Cheers!

Fuzz Evil, Fuzz Evil (2016)

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