Live Review: Roadburn 2018 Hardrock Hideout, 04.18.18

Posted in Features, Reviews on April 18th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

butcher on stage photo jj koczan

04.19.18 – 12:11AM CET – Wednesday night – Hotel Mercure Rm. 224

The Hardrock Hideout is Roadburn‘s annual way of bringing fest-goers into the world of the happening itself. I’d say it eases them in, but there’s usually very little easing happening at all. This year? Three Belgian acts — one multi-genre noise assault and two thrashing speed-rippers each more metal than the last. It was a bill organized in conjunction with Babylon Doom Cult Records and booked in honor of Bidi van Drongelen, who worked at the fest, was close with Walter, and passed away last year. Thrash with a purpose, then. So be it.

One consistent theme for Roadburn each year is growth and I look at how the personality of the Hardrock Hideout has changed even over the last couple years as an example of that. There’s still space for the occasional bit of doom — Atala played, as did The Skull maybe two years back — but the dominant persona of the evening is way more metal than it once was; a capsule analog for how the festival itself has redefined and expanded its scope.

It was an 8:30PM start for a bill with Witch TrailSpeed Queen and Bütcher, in that order, and after a nap that I was going to take whether I wanted to or not, I made it down to Cul de Sac well in advance of the start time.

Here’s how it went from there:

Witch Trail

witch-trail-photo-jj-koczan

I already wish I’d bought a copy of their 2017 album, Thole, which doesn’t bode well for the weekend to come in terms of pulling the trigger on merch-regrets, but so it goes. The three-piece were easily the odd-men-out on the bill and that seemed like a position they should be well used to considering the complexity of the stylistic blend they play, running anywhere from alt-noise riffing in the ’90s style to doomed crash and plod to blackened blastbeating and screams. Based in Ghent, they impressed on cuts like “Splendour” and “Unnatural Caresses,” which took their time unfolding the aesthetic gamut, but never seemed more patient than was warranted or failed to justify one turn into the other. They were right on, in short, and it’s a good thing Thole is up as a name-your-price download so at least I can mitigate my not-CD-buying woes. It’s not the same of course, but it’s hard to argue with, anyhow. They had a couple hiccups during their set but were my pick for the night, hands down, with a sound that seemed as likely to pique the interest of Fenriz as that of Thurston Moore. Not an easy bridge to cross for most bands.

Speed Queen

speed-queen-photo-jj-koczan

High tops, studded belts, two guitars speed-picking, fists raised, beer downed, Speed Queen had the thing nailed, and the thing was classic thrash. For their traditionalist West Coast presentation — see above re: high tops, etc. — they were notably tight, which was doubly remarkable considering the liberal amount of beer pounded while on stage. Frontman Thomas Kenis, with “1992” tattooed on one wrist and an infinity symbol tattooed on the other — it’s good to have goals — didn’t even lose his balance in all that windmill headbanging during songs like “Speed Queen,” “Midnight Murder” and “Live Hard” early in the set. “King of the Road,” somewhat sadly, was not a cover (in fact it’s the title-track of their 2017 debut EP), but “Nice Boys Don’t Play Rock ‘n’ Roll” was, and they gave the Rose Tattoo track a thrashing sneaker to the ass no less fervent than that delivered to their originals. By the time they were deeper into their set, the shouts of “Hey! Hey! Hey!” were coming from more than just their road crew, and it was plain to see Speed Queen‘s classic style had won the hearts and increasingly addled minds of the assembled.

Bütcher

butcher (Photo by JJ Koczan)

Their setlist promised a “Speed Metal Attakk,” and that’s precisely what Antwerp-based five-piece Bütcher delivered as they supported last year’s debut album, Bestial Fükkin’ Warmachine. Need I say more? Probably not, but I will. A rare moshpit was formed at the Cul de Sac, which generally I wouldn’t think has the size to support such a thing, let alone the festival temperament, and yours truly got shoved around a bit as I watched the band deliver their oldskööl metal onslaught, one slicing, punishing cut into the next. Frontman R. Hellshrieker was quick to throw a spiked-armband claw when not holding onto his upside-down-spiked-cross mic stand, and guitarists KK Rippeand DB Deströyer tore into classic-style everything while bassist JA Pulsatör and drummer PB Tormentor pummeled ahead into the forward-thrust grooves. It was heavy, duh, and while I could say I was tired, jetlagged, needed to go back to the hotel and write, and so on, the truth is that Hellshrieker and his elaborately named companions gave oldschool metal a culminating representation worthy of being called true homage, and still managed to find space to inject a personality of their own into the proceedings. I’m telling you, I’ve seen a lot of bands play the Cul de Sac. I can’t recall any of them inducing a mosh. Clearly that takes something special in intent and execution, and Bütcher‘s unabashed metal-for-the-love-of-metal was exactly that.

I’m at least several things, if not many. Two or three. One thing I’m not is the “partying kind.” Socialization? Good times? Sounds utterly horrifying, and I don’t care what anti-anxiety meds you put me on, it won’t be enough for me to not notice how much that party isn’t me-in-front-of-laptop. Weirdo Canyon was jumping off for a Wednesday night — a whole other level on which Roadburn 2018 was being launched, and as I walked out of Cul de Sac, I not only saw Walter and Becky, but Lee from The Sleeping Shaman — with whom I’m once again sharing a hotel room and considering myself fortunate to be in his company — and the artist Cavum, Yvonne, the photographer Dante Torrieri, the dudes from Mirror Queen and a goodly portion of the San Diego Takeover guys with whom I’d rode into town this morning. Strange sometimes to feel like you don’t belong in the one place you belong. That’s all I’ll say about it.

Tomorrow’s a busy day. First day of the fest, sure, but also the first day Lee and I will be finalizing the Weirdo Canyon Dispatch and, for the first time, sending it off to a professional press to be done ahead of doors opening. That makes me less guaranteed to get a copy, but I’m going to try anyhow, of course. This is our fifth year of the WCD daily festival fanzine. It’s hard to imagine how stupid lucky I am to be able to be here and to work on that as a part of my trip every year. I’ve been looking forward to sitting in the office for months. Really.

Lots more to come. Thanks for reading in the meantime. Some extra pics after the jump if you’re up for such things.

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Roadburn 2018 Trip Pt. 2: Hello Again, Tilburg

Posted in Features on April 18th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

san diego takeover dudes at roadburn 2018

04.18.18 – 1:26PM CET – Wednesday afternoon – Hotel Mercure, Room 200-something

The flight was a flight. I had my middle seat, someone on either side of me. Full plane. I availed myself of the entertainment package and watched that inexplicable but not necessarily awful Blade Runner sequel. That ate up a decent chunk of time. Then I slept for about the last two and a half hours. As well as one does on a plane, and by that I mean my eyes are closing as I type this. Ker-plunk.

I was supposed to share a car with Stephen Brodsky from Mutoid Man — or, you know, the dude who sang “Jupiter” when Cave In were the shit — but I waited for like an hour at the shuttle place at Schiphol Airport and he never showed up, so Dave Sweetapple, who helped organized the San Diego Takeover, plays in Witch and Sweet Apple, and is responsible fora lot of the awesome shit that Tee Pee has put out over the last however long and his very kind wife Robin were generous enough to offer me a spot in their van. Actually they were two vans.

And I don’t know who else might’ve been riding around, but these might’ve been the two gnarliest vans on the road in the country at that given moment. Dudes blasted tunes, dudes shouted random stuff about Dutch cows as we passed farmlands. Dudes laughed it up with enough inside jokes that I felt like I’d been invited to sit at some other clique’s lunch table. They tried twice to stop for beer atweirdo canyon in progress gas stations — to no avail either time. Drugs were discussed. A can of beer was thrown.

Rowdy only begins to cover it. It was high-performance shenanigans and though I was falling asleep by the end of the ride — much as I am now — it was still a good time. Got to the venue, my bag was unloaded with the rest of the gear, and I grabbed it and made my way back here, walking down the street of an in-progress Weirdo Canyon, which gven how nice the weather is here, should be packed for the next few days.

Roadburn 2018 starts in a few hours with the Hardrock Hideout. I’m going to crash and see if I can buy some fruit or yogurt beforehand. Fingers crossed and more to come.

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Review & Full Album Premiere: Sun Voyager, Seismic Vibes

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on April 18th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Sun Voyager Seismic Vibes

[Click play above to stream Sun Voyager’s Seismic Vibes in its entirety. Album is out April 20 on King Pizza Records.]

Here’s a post from May 2014 about how Sun Voyager‘s debut album would be out that summer. The band had two demos to their name at that point — early 2013’s Cosmic Tides and late 2013’s Mecca (review here) — and though it turn out their first long-player would in no way be out that summer or any time between then and now, they filled the intervening years via splits with Greasy Hearts (discussed here) and The Mad Doctors (review here), as well as 2015’s Lazy Daze EP (review here). The Orange County, New York, heavy psych outfit discussed the making of their full-length and even went so far as to post the opening track “Trip” in early 2017. So to say that Seismic Vibes, which at last sees release through King Pizza Records, has been a while in the making is maybe understating it a little.

They’ve kept consistent playing live shows, and since Lazy Daze came out they’ve pared down their lineup from a two-guitar four-piece to a trio — though in addition to the core of vocalist/guitarist Carlos Francisco, bassist/guitarist/vocalist Stefan Mersch and drummer Kyle Beach, the album’s credits also list Evan Heinze on keyboard and Sam Bey on percussion; that trio may or may not be in a process of expansion — and between that and leaking tracks from the originally self-titled Seismic Vibes, one could hardly accuse them of laziness in bringing the record to fruition. Sometimes these things just take a while. Tracked by Paul Ritchie down the Jersey Shore and mastered by Alan Douches, the eight-song/34-minute offering that has resulted from whatever arduous process was undertaken can only be considered worth the effort.

Maybe that’s not saying much, but the point to be made is that one can hear on Seismic Vibes the growth that’s taken place in Sun Voyager‘s sound even since Lazy Daze, which opened with “God is Dead,” a song that’s turned into the extended, jammed-out closer on the full-length. That track is the only carry-over between the two outings, and as one might hope, Sun Voyager use the opportunity of their first full-length to showcase the dynamic they’ve worked hard through the last several years to build. The keys and vocal arrangement on a song like “Hair Brained” speak to an increase in complexity overall, not to mention the sitar-sounding guitar solo that follows and the effects swirl surrounding, but even the opening salvo of “Trip,” “Open Road” and “Caves of Steel” seem to signal a driven purposefulness of intent — that is, the fact that these tracks aren’t just cobbled together, but placed consciously to affect the listener’s experience of the record. All under four minutes and pointedly uptempo, the first three tracks work quickly to establish the momentum that will carry the listener through the ensuing dynamic that unfolds.

sun voyager

Beginning with an unassuming hum, “Trip” is among the catchiest hooks on Seismic Vibes, tambourine and all, and the keyboard-laced “Open Road” holds a tension in its drums that drives mellower verses into the more densely-fuzzed chorus, keyboards filling out the melody during the verse and the cacophonous-but-quick payoff at the end. Mersch‘s bass and Francisco‘s guitar swirl begins “Caves of Steel,” but this too unveils itself quickly as a fuzz riot, and thrusts into tom runs backing a hook repeating the title line and a jammy ending that cuts short at about 3:10 but sounds like it could just as easily keep going into perpetuity. Though it too is short at 3:38, there’s a marked change in pace as “Stellar Winds” comes on, and for the first time, Sun Voyager introduce their more languid side; a sound more derived from shoegaze than the spaced-out semi-punk of “Caves of Steel” just prior. Francisco‘s voice is well-suited to drift, which is not something every singer can pull off, and though “Stellar Winds” is mellower than the first three cuts, it still offers a sense of build and turns directly into “Hair Brained,” which is arguably the speediest and most active inclusion here, reminiscent as it is of some of early Nebula‘s frenetic stoner punk.

As noted, the keys are a factor in fleshing out “Hair Brained,” and they play a role in offsetting the bouncing rhythm as it makes its way to a winding cold-stop finish, and it might be the keys as well that tie “Hair Brained” to the subsequent “Too Much,” which is an immediate switch in method from its predecessor and the most open-feeling song on Seismic Vibes, molten and hypnotic in a way that much of the record has simply chosen not to be. At five minutes, its roll is second in length only to the aforementioned “God is Dead,” and the two tracks are separated by the 3:35 “Psychic Lords,” a slowdown leading to the quiet/loud tradeoffs as Sun Voyager find a place for themselves in a niche of cosmic grunge that calls back to the hooks earlier on the album without giving up the expansion that’s happened since.

The start of “God is Dead” is a bit jarring coming out of the subdued end of “Psychic Lords,” and I suspect it will be all the more for anyone who encountered Lazy Daze, as it was a standout there, but in this redone, expanded version, it provides a fitting summary of just about everything Seismic Vibes delivers, with a jammy feel underscoring forward drive, shifts in tempo and a controlled psychedelic sensibility that’s light on self-indulgence and still manages to feel like it’s exploring new terrain. One would be remiss in not noting that though it’s been some time in its realization, this is still Sun Voyager‘s debut album, and yes, there is room for the band to continue to grow into their sound, to refine their balance of volume and tempo and straightforward and open structures, but the core of songwriting is there as it has been for the last half-decade, and there’s little chance Seismic Vibes won’t end up as one of 2018’s best first LPs. As a fan of the band, I’m just glad it finally happened.

Sun Voyager on Bandcamp

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Roadburn 2018 Trip Pt. 1: Departure, Terminal A, Gate 14, Boston

Posted in Features on April 17th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

the airplane

04.17.18 – 4:54PM Eastern – Tuesday evening – Boston Logan Airport, Terminal A

The Patient Mrs. heartily recommended an airport egg salad sandwich. I think she’s out of her mind. So it goes.

They were boarding an earlier flight to Amsterdam when I walked up to the gate, and I thought maybe if I asked nicely enough they’d let me change — anything to avoid a middle seat — but no dice. They were polite enough at the info counter but I was shot down more or less immediately all the same. Blamo. Full flight departs in about two hours, gets in early morning CET. I expect it will be a much less pleasant kind of red eye than the one (or three) I made this morning when I poured espresso in my coffee. No worries. I’m hearty.

A little too hearty for the middle seat, these days.

I don’t eat plane food as a general rule. I was on an Air India flight once, and that was okay, but beyond that I generally think of it as microwaved poison. I brought ana apple, an orange and some protein bars. They’re trying to kill you, the airlines. Fortunately I was born with a special brain and can see through all the friendly smiles in the safety videos. Did I mention I’m flying Delta? This is going to be amazing.

I’m actually not being sarcastic about that last part. This is going to be amazing. 2018 will mark my 10th year attending the Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, the Netherlands. I’ve been fortunate enough in my time to come to know the city the pecanreasonably well — at very least the area by the venue and train station and record shops, etc. — and I’ve never managed to feel so at home that at a place that wasn’t actually my home.

This year will be different from last year or any other year before, since in addition to leaving The Patient Mrs. behind I’m also leaving The Pecan behind. He turns six months old in about a week. I’ll be back in time for that, but he’s proto-crawling at this point and I expect he’ll be on the move at least in some capacity by the time I return. I got video of him the other day rolling over back to front for the first time. Dad stuff.

A bunch of people waiting for the flight in Boston Marathon jackets. That’s a thing that apparently happened this week. I’d be as likely to run to the Netherlands as I’d be to make it 26 miles, so yeah. Way to get a bright orange windbreaker.

I’m excited to see what the next few days bring. Each Roadburn is a different experience seeing it, being there writing about it, the whole thing. I don’t know yet what Roadburn 2018 will be like, and I’ve got a while to go before I get there and actually find out, but it gives me something to look forward to while I’m in that middle seat inevitably taking up more room than I want to be.

Thanks in advance for reading this year’s Roadburn coverage if you do. Off I go.

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Ancient Lights Premiere Trailer for Self-Titled Debut

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 17th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

ancient lights photo mark swaffield

I know what you’re thinking: Really? A premiere for an album trailer? Well, it’s six and a half minutes long, so quit complaining.

Unceasingly grim in its atmosphere and honed to murky depths that are equal parts obtuse and hypnotic, the self-titled debut from UK three-piece Ancient Lights tops 70 minutes — comes closer to 90 when you count the CD/DL bonus material — and is set to release in July via Ritual Productions. It is a meandering psychedelic wash, repetition and ambience given priority over structure as the trio of bassist/vocalist/guitarist Adam Richardson, guitarist Ben Carr and drummer Tim Bertilsson combine and in some ways surpass their pedigrees in bands like Ramesses5ive and Switchblade in order to push as far out as possible.

Do they get there? Oh, they get there. “War of Attrition” sounds like it’s being fought against the notion of consciousness itself, while 17-minute pieces like “Against Nature” and “Fallow Year” drift into a willed-into-existence sonic beyond. Immersion: inevitable. To call it hypnotic as above is underselling it both in concept and execution. It’s not just the listener being hypnotized here; it’s the band as well. The feedback-soaked, chant-laden “Asakai Dasa” feels as much about the experience of its creation as the resulting “song.” In this way, Ancient Lights are in communion with themselves, with their audience, and with the moment captured on the recording. This is characteristic of much of Richardson‘s work in Ramesses or 11PARANOIAS — the latter of whom also reportedly have new material in the works — but I’m not sure it’s even been driven to such psychedelic extremes as it is on Ancient Lights.

Because it is a work of extremity. Not in the sense of blastbeats or death metal vocals or anything like that, but in its sheer willingness to delve into its own psychosis, Ancient Lights‘ debut is neither for the feint of heart nor the closed of mind. Its triumph lies not in emerging on the other side of “Fallow Year” unscathed, but in having made the journey through it in the first place, and even shorter pieces like “Orichalcum Eater” (2:57) or the plodding “Miasmaculatum” (3:58) make an offering of swirl with more than enough undertow to pull its audience away from their own being. To put a realistic point on it, it’s a hard record to write about because I keep feeling my mind wander in time to the ensuing nod.

The trailer gives a taste of opener “Decaying Lotus,” the subsequent “Temple Ghosts” and the bonus track “Vessel of Inevitability,” and again, if your concern is that most album teasers don’t give a sense of the substance of the record itself, you’re not wrong. I assure you that’s not the case here. Click play and find out for yourself. PR wire info follows, as usual.

Enjoy:

Ancient Lights, Ancient Lights album trailer premiere

Immerse yourself and preview the tracks ‘Decaying Lotus’, ‘Vessel of Inevitability’ and ‘Temple Ghosts’ from Ancient Lights debut self-titled album, out on Ritual Productions July 2018.

Ancient Lights refuse to tread worn sonic terrain with their debut, instead crafting a dynamic and textured journey that explores pastures of darkness, ambience, radiance and disintegration. Comprised of members of esteemed bands of the heavy palette, the origins of the band came after 13 shadowy years of jammed discourse and psychic plotting between Adam Richardson (11PARANOIAS, Ramesses) and Ben Carr (5ive, INTRCPTR), with the optimal addition of Tim Bertilsson (Switchblade) catalysing the final reality of this band.

Trailer directed by Cristiane Richardson and edited by Sergio Angot.

The band recorded their debut rite at Bonafide Studios, London under the spell of the 2017 summer solstice sky with Dan Miller. Additional recording by Ben Carr and Adam Richardson in June 2017 at XL Recordings Studio. Mixing and mastering by Dan Miller and Adam Richardson in December 2017 at XL Recordings Studio, London.

ANCIENT LIGHTS is:
Tim Bertilsson – drums
Adam Richardson – bass, guitar, vocals & lyrics
Ben Carr – guitar

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Ancient Lights on Twitter

Ritual Productions on Thee Facebooks

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Ritual Productions website

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Review & Track Premiere: Svvamp, Svvamp 2

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on April 17th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

svvamp svvamp 2

[Click play above to stream the premiere of ‘Hillside’ from Svvamp’s new album, Svvamp 2, out June 8 on RidingEasy Records and available now to preorder.]

The soothing effect of the 42-second intro to Svvamp 2 is immediate, and from there, the Swedish trio of vocalist/guitarist Henrik Bjorklund, vocalist/bassist Erik Stahlgren and vocalist/drummer Adam Johansson present a run of pointedly classic-vibing heavy rock and roll. They made something of an understated self-titled debut (review here) in 2016, catching ears among the converted and reaping praise for their endearing sonic naturalism. That theme very much continues on Svvamp 2, which moves from its introduction into the heavier-riffed highlight “Queen” and the blues-rolling “The Wheel,” with the first of several vocalist switches working subtly to add variety and texture to the straightforward songwriting and traditionalist, vintage spirit of the recording.

While the groups who arguably led the charge for recrafting heavy ’70s sonic warmth — fellow Swedes like Witchcraft, Graveyard, Burning Saviours, etc. — have moved on toward more modern aesthetics, Svvamp hold firm to the tenets of the subgenre while proving there’s still new ground to cover, as the poppy, soul-derived bounce of “Sunshine Street” demonstrates, the fuzz subtle and the drums spacious like they were beamed straight in from 1969, and the subsequent “How Sweet Would it Be” only reinforces this notion, like a lost studio cut from the Get Back sessions, the guitars leading the easy groove punctuated by steady, languid cymbal timekeeping. Semi-harmonized vocal melodies evoke the sweetness in the title without losing the effectiveness of the hook that emerges: “Oh, out in the country/Me and my baby/We’re gonna be so damn free now.”

It is the fodder of humid summer singalongs, and much to their credit, they make you believe it. Plenty of vintage bands have popped up in the wake of the likes of Kadavar, Blues Pills, and so on, and attempted to capture heavy blues lightning in a psychedelic bottle. Well, Svvamp may be reverse-engineering innovation, but whatever they might be doing throughout their second album, their heart is in it, from the chorus of “Queen” through Stahlgren‘s bassline in (presumed) side B opener “Hillside” and on to closer “Alligater” (sic), the expression remains genuine and the swing remains a fervent, crucial factor. With a current running through it of analog synth or effects, “Surrender” nonetheless mirrors the fluidity of “The Wheel” earlier, and while the “beep-boop-beep” might seem a little out of place among all the focus on organic elements and execution, it’s ultimately the latter that win out in the song.

svvamp

To follow side A/B symmetry as they have so far, Svvamp should be dipping into more soulful fare à la “Sunshine Street” with “Out of Line,” but they change the script and instead offer a swaggering bounce and riff-forward groove, a touch of wah worked into a midsection that seems to layer its guitar solo across both left and right channels. More akin to “Queen” and “Hillside” for its rhythm and good-time rocking feel, “Out of Line” caps with another call and response solo — maybe in three layers? — on a long fadeout and gives way to the acoustic penultimate cut “Blues Inside,” the shortest inclusion on Svvamp 2 save for “Intro,” and a quiet reflective moment before “Alligater” taps Blue Cheer for the most raucous stretch on the album to close.

Once again, Svvamp find themselves nestled into heavy blues, but “Alligater” is more blown out on the whole and more of a wash than any of its rocking predecessors on Svvamp 2, and the crashing, the layers of fuzz, the rumble beneath all come together to give a sense of the kind of party the trio can hone when the mood strikes. I wouldn’t exactly call the record subtle in its purposes, but Svvamp 2 does build on the debut’s accomplishments, and for all the changes in singer and approach it presents throughout its 35 minutes, the flow remains consistent across the span, and perhaps the band’s greatest strength lies in their utter lack of pretense. While some in a vintage mindset have attempted to capture a progressive feel and met with varying degrees of success, by keeping their material outwardly simple, catchy and friendly, JohanssonStahlgren and Bjorklund are able to give their audience something to latch onto without an overdose of self-indulgence or a departure from their core purpose.

Apart perhaps from “Intro” and “Blues Inside” — and mostly for length in the case of the latter — there isn’t one song between “Queen,” “The Wheel,” “Sunshine Street,” “How Sweet it Would Be,” “Hillside,” “Surrender,” “Out of Line” and “Alligater” that wouldn’t work as a 45RPM single, its paper sleeve crinkled and found in some dusty record shop bin like so much buried treasure. And though they may be looking back aesthetically in terms of finding their points of inspiration in classic heavy rock circa 1968-’72, they’re also pushing themselves forward as songwriters and stewards of this sonic legacy. They wield it better than most, and on Svvamp 2 they demonstrate plainly that even something so plainly tied to a specific era can also sound timeless.

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The Moonshine Brand Announce June 22 Release for Debut Album On the Waves of Time

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 17th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

the moonshine brand

German classic-style heavy rockers The Moonshine Brand seemed on their 2017 debut EP, Welcome to Gypsy Town, to find a place of sonic naturalism that’s not quite retro-minded but still warm and organic in its execution. Whether this will carry into their impending debut full-length, On the Waves of Time, remains to be seen upon that album’s release, which is set for June 22 via Burning Wax Productions. Nestled into familiar but welcome bluesy vibes, the band work easy-rolling tempos and grooves to a near-psychedelic swirl, and whether they’ll push ahead with that or toy with the balance one way or the other piques interest as regards the album as a whole. I guess the point is I’m curious to hear this record.

Late June is still a ways away, so there’s no audio yet, but here’s cover art and info and links, all courtesy of the PR wire:

The Moonshine Brand On the Waves of Time

Psychedelic rockers THE MOONSHINE BRAND unveil details for new album “On The Waves Of Time” on Burning Wax Productions.

Germany-based psychedelic rockers THE MOONSHINE BRAND share details about their forthcoming new album “On The Waves Of Time”, to be issued June 22 on Burning Wax Productions.

A sense of the 3rd, brought to you by a bunch of young musicians with a fable for good handmade rock music of the old time future. THE MOONSHINE BRAND’s scientific approach of lecturing the twilight will give your mind a transcendental walk through the blue fields of space & fantasy, to enlighten the blurred visions of truth… “Take a rest from your thoughts and ride them waves! With a calm mind comes a sense of freedom, but being free is not a mindless game. Free are those who embrace the riddle of the world. Surf the ocean inside your mind. Know the waves from rogue to ripple. Now close your eyes again and feel the wind. The wind is time.”

New album “On The Waves Of Time” is eight songs for any tide, dealing with the way of the world and what it might become. The album was produced by The Druid, Mojo Seeker & The Moon, recorded and mixed at Electric Mojoland by Michael Mölders. Artwork was designed by MontDoom.

THE MOONSHINE BRAND “On The Waves Of Time”
Out June 22nd on Burning Wax Productions

TRACK LISTING:
1. Menace To Society
2. Free Your Mind
3. Humble Queen
4. Surfing Through Space
5. Delusion
6. Acquainted Blues
7. Wasted With You (No Time For The Blues)
8. Daughter Of The Moon

THE MOONSHINE BRAND IS
Ian Andrews – Bass & Vocals
Martin Petersson – Guitar
Tim Mitchell – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/TheMoonshineBrand/
https://themoonshinebrand.bandcamp.com/
https://www.themoonshinebrand.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Burning-Wax-Productions-1862261630766578/
https://twitter.com/burningwaxprod
http://www.burningwaxproductions.com/

The Moonshine Brand, Welcome to Gypsy Town (2017)

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Viaje a 800 to Reissue Estampida de Trombones June 5

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 17th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

The simple fact is that Viaje a 800 were years ahead of their time. Years. After their Diablo Roto De… debut in 2001, the band took more than half a decade to deliver a follow-up in Estampida de Trombones, but they made that wait absolutely worth it. Rife with memorable songs that crossed any and all language barriers with their fludity of groove and memorable melodies, it was a record that, if it came out today in the sphere of social media word-of-mouth, would have them headlining tours and digging into slots at one festival after the next. Don’t believe me? Listen to the record. You’ll understand.

Estampida de Trombones is being given a get-it-while-you-can limited vinyl repressing through Spinda Records that’s up for preorder now and officially out June 5. If there’s any justice in the universe, they’ll be long gone by the time June gets here. Make that happen.

Info from the PR wire and the preorder page:

viaje a 800 estampida de trombones vinyl

Viaje a 800 re-edit ‘Estampida de Trmobones’ on vinyl

The stampede returns … YELL!

Exhausted years ago, with skyrocketing prices in the second-hand market and over time become an authentic cult album among the followers of progressive rock, stoner or psychedelic rock, ‘Estampida de trombones’ from Viaje a 800 is re-edited these days through the independent label Spinda Records.

PRE-ORDER NOW AVAILABLE

Released: June 5, 2018
Price: € 20 (pre-order offer)

‘Estampida de Trombones’ 11th Anniversary Numbered-Limited Edition Orange-Translucent 12″ Vinyl, including new artwork and lyrics.

Music & Lyrics by Viaje a 800.
Special guests: Andeas Papandreus (‘Cáncer Bahía’) & Curro Snortil (‘Estampida de Trombones’).
Produced by Viaje a 800 & Spinda Records.
Recorded & Mixed at La Casa del Perro (Algeciras) by Curro Snortil.
Mastering by J.M. Sagrisa at Estudios Punta Paloma (Tarifa).
Photography by Steele-grasza.
Artwork by Artidoto.

Track-list:
SIDE A
1. Los ángeles que hay en mi piel
2. El amor es un perro del infierno
3. Dios astrónomo
4. Ossario
5. Zé
SIDE B
6. Luto
7. Patio Custodio
8. Estampida de trombones
9. Cabezas de tugsteno
10. Cáncer bahía

Vinyl Edition by Spinda Records (5th June 2018)

300 numbered units
Vinyl 12 “Gatefold
Translucent orange vinyl
Includes lyrics
Good trip…

https://www.facebook.com/Viaje-a-800-373382802690104/
https://viajea800.bandcamp.com/
http://www.spindarecords.com/product/viaje-a-800-estampida-de-trombones-vinyl

Viaje a 800, Estampida de Trombones (2007)

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