Pylar to Release Pyedra Nov. 2; Preorders Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 29th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

pylar-700

Three years after making their full-length debut with Poderoso Se Alza en My (review here) and one year after the follow-up He Venydo a Reclamar My Trono, the offshoot project Pylar from members of Orthodox and Blooming Látigo mark a return with Pyedra, due out Nov. 2 on Alone Records and available now to preorder. The band has a teaser for the album posted on the TubesofYou that as you can see/hear below offers suitably bizarre and ritualized vibes. I apparently completely missed out on the second record — hey, it happens; I’m only one dude and last year was, to be generous, a shitshow — but the new one is something to look forward to and I’ve still got some time to dig in before November, so if you need me I’ll be getting on that.

Info comes courtesy of the PR wire:

pylar pyedra-700

PYLAR new album PYEDRA

After two albums and an EP highly acclaimed by critics and reviewers, PYLAR are back with their new album entitled PYEDRA, to be released November 2nd through Alone Records, featuring four tracks dedicated to the stone as a cosmic symbol of megalithic cultures. Those civilisations used big stones (megaliths) to raise their temples, tombs and paths.

PYLAR was formed in 2012 with members of Blooming Latigo and former components of Orthodox but it is still uncertain who is behind this enigmatic project inspired by prehistoric religions and the occult, hiding their faces behind masks and ceremonial clothing.

PYLAR are nourished from the echoes of big stones received in the atavistic depth of the dolmen and tell stories in arcane tongues for us to remember the one route to confront cosmic terror is transcending Death through the Holy Black Stone: Mother Goddess, the centerpiece of Earth and pilar of existence.

PYLAR evoke the power of stone through monolithic guitars and tectonic drums. The stone as a testament to the timelessness, laden with nuances and expressed in the form of strings and numinous winds increasing the intensity beyond logic and sanity. Chants speaking of menhirs, metheors and monoliths opening the gate to a time when space and death were one, symbolized by the power and strength of megaliths, where ancient gods shall dwell in eternal gravity and stillness.

PYEDRA will be released in November 2nd, Day of the Ancient Spirits, celebrated after the Feast of Samhain and the rise of the Darkened Moon, second to last of the year, for we go deep into the Dark Season, where spirits from ancient stones dwell.

The album is available for preorder on CD and vinyl format at The Stone Circle at reduced price. Vinyl version is strictly limited to 200 copies on Black vinyl and just 100 units in Yellow colour. A first teaser can be found at Youtube.

https://www.facebook.com/PPYLARR/
http://pylartheband.blogspot.com.es/
https://www.facebook.com/alonerecords.spain/
http://www.the-stone-circle.com/store/en/

Pylar, Pyedra teaser

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Friday Full-Length: Monster Magnet, Dopes to Infinity

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 26th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Monster Magnet, Dopes to Infinity (1995)

Have you looked to your orb lately? Of all the warning systems ever designed by humanity, orb-based is probably the most crucially overlooked. Nonetheless, Dopes to Infinity, Monster Magnet‘s third album, is 21 years old. In its and the band’s home state of New Jersey, it could drink legally, though something about cuts like “Dopes to Infinity,” “Negasonic Teenage Warhead,” “Third Alternative,” “Blow ’em Off” and “King of Mars” makes me suspect the record wouldn’t have waited until now to imbibe. Even more than two decades later, Dopes to Infinity is still way more the snotty 14-year-old kid in a way-too-big leather jacket in the woods with a bottle of his dad’s Whatever teasing anyone in the vicinity who sips and is surprised at the taste. I was fortunate enough to see the band perform this album live — though the songs weren’t in the same order, as I recall — in Brooklyn in 2012 with Naam and Quest for Fire on the bill, either of whom could easily be considered an acolyte on some level, and nearly five years after that, the resonant impression remains that this was the moment where the band’s early freakout impulses really began to meet with a more straightforward hard rock style that the band would develop to wider commercial success. Don’t get me wrong, their 1991 Spine of God debut should be considered among the finest East Coast psychedelic records ever tracked — we’re talking Velvet Underground-style pedestal-putting, in a perfect world — but even as “All Friends and Kingdom Come” tripped out, it also kept a sense of hook, and in the years to come, it was that impulse which more fully took hold.

What’s fortunate about that is that Monster Magnet — then Dave Wyndorf on vocals, guitar, bass, percussion, theremin, production, etc., Ed Mundell on guitar and bass, Joe Calandra on guitar and bass, and Jon Kleiman on drums and bass — had the songwriting chops to make landmark choruses seem like tossoffs, like something thrown together over the course of an afternoon. And maybe they were, I don’t know. The point is that although Monster Magnet would eventually become a much different band and be a much different band for a long time on 1998’s Powertrip, 2001’s God Says No and 2004’s Monolithic Baby!, Dopes to Infinity catches a crucial transitional moment in action coming off Spine of God and its 1993 follow-up, Superjudge, also essential. Of course, after 2010’s Mastermind (review here), the band — Wyndorf as the last original member still present — made a stylistic pivot back toward a more psychedelic vibe with 2013’s Last Patrol (review here) and would continue to develop their rediscovered weirdo impulses over the course of two revisionist works, 2014’s Milking the Stars (review here) and 2015’s Cobras and Fire (review here), revisiting Last Patrol and Mastermind, respectively. But even as they made that sonic shift, Dopes to Infinity could easily be said to be the model being followed more even than the two records before it, precisely because of that memorable songcraft one hears coming to the fore on “I Control, I Fly” and the brilliant lyrical proclamations of “King of Mars.”

Monster Magnet toured Europe this Spring “celebrating the A&M years” — A&M Records having released their work between 1993-2001 — and that’s fair enough, but as relevant as Dopes to Infinity still is, Monster Magnet keep moving forward even when looking back on older material. I don’t know what they’ll do at this point other than to say it’s a safe bet they won’t be touring the US anytime soon, but one hopes their progression will continue going into their next record. And I hope they keep getting weirder. We’ll see when we get there.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

Total comedown this week from the first-ever The Obelisk All-Dayer (wrap here) at Saint Vitus Bar in Brooklyn last Saturday. A return to real life that found me working at about 30 percent consciousness until, well, I’ll be generous and say Wednesday. Plenty of good music to help me keep my head up, but yeah. The week dragged and was a drag.

One more time, thank you if you came out to the Vitus Bar for making the day so special. The day had its ups and downs, but in the end it was exactly the vibe I was hoping to capture. I hope I remember it for as long as I can remember anything.

As I write this it’s early Friday morning and the sun is just rising. I can still hear nighttime crickets. It’s nearly 6AM now; I’ve been up since about four. I’ve been going to bed early at night and getting up early to write reviews and posts like this on weekdays, and it’s helped me keep sane during the work week and try to balance job things and Obelisk things in a way that might otherwise prevent my head from exploding. Doesn’t do much for my ability to get to shows generally — I’m 34 years old and can’t wait for that midlife crisis to kick in so I can start going out again to non-fest gigs — but I’m doing what I can to write as much as possible. That’s what matters to me.

The Patient Mrs. is going south to Connecticut this weekend. I am not. Aside from the fact that it’s August and that’s not exactly my idea of beach weather — I recognize this does not apply to the rest of humanity — I think a quiet Saturday in the air conditioning will go a long way toward continued recovery from last weekend and this week. Plus there’s laundry to do. It just seemed like the way to go. So yeah, I’ll be around. I’m sure by Saturday night/Sunday morning I’ll be so bored out of my head I won’t know what to do with myself. That’s the hope, anyway.

Next week, look out for a full stream and review of the Swans-related record from Quin Galavis that’s noisy and folky and bizarre in a lot of the right ways, as well as a review/video premiere (a rare one-two combo) of the new Monkey3 album, a review of the new and apparently final The Wounded Kings full-length, and a whole lot more. I’m also hoping to nail down my travel plans to Norway next month for Høstsabbat, and will keep you posted on how that goes.

In the meantime, thank you for reading. Please have a great and safe weekend and please check out the forum and the radio stream.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

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When the Deadbolt Breaks Release Limited EP Until it all Collides

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 26th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Connecticut creepers When the Deadbolt Breaks have signed to Salt of the Earth Records for the release of a new limited EP titled Until it all Collides that finds them taking their malevolent drone and despairing doom on the road for a handful of shows. The band, who were last heard from with 2013’s Drifting Towards the Edge of the Earth full-length, are past the decade mark in their tenure, but they remain thoroughly undervalued in my estimation. I’ve never known anyone who’s seen them live consider them anything less than devastating, one way or another.

On record and certainly in videos like those for “The Woods are Full of Killers” (posted here) and “Sleeps in Burning Hills” (review here), that devastation is complemented by a threatening aesthetic, a looming sense of violence beneath the music and imagery of their material. Seems only fair to think the same applies to Until it all Collides going by the fetish cover art and the promo video for the release, which you can see below. Dark impulses all over the place.

The PR wire sent over the following if you’d like to curdle some blood, either your own or that of those around you. Dig it:

when the deadbolt breaks until it all collides

When the Deadbolt Breaks follows no one. They seek nothing from above. They only wish to trample under foot the masses as they march hand in hand over the falls…

If you are weak, don’t bother.

Salt of the Earth Records is proud to announce the signing of CT doom heavyweights When the Deadbolt Breaks!!!

Today we release the band’s fifth endeavor: Until it all Collides.

This is a limited run, special tour edition EP.

Order yours now while supplies last!

When the Deadbolt Breaks & Buzzard Canyon: The Great Highway Run
08.26 B Side Ballroom Oneonta NY
08.27 Hard Luck Bar Toronto ON – Doom Over T.O. w/ Mars Red Sky, Kings Destroy, Foghound, Castle and more
08.28 CroBar Montreal QC
08.29 Battery Street Jeans Burlington VT
10.01 Spanky’s Dive Bar Springfield VT
10.07 33 Golden New London CT

When the Deadbolt Breaks is:
Aaron Lewis
Mike Parkyn
Randy Dumas

http://saltoftheearthrecords.com/salt-of-the-earth-records-store
https://www.facebook.com/WhentheDeadboltBreaks/

When the Deadbolt Breaks, Until it all Collides promo video

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SubRosa, For this We Fought the Battle of Ages: The Integral

Posted in Reviews on August 26th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

subrosa for this we fought the battle of ages

The real challenge when it comes to SubRosa‘s fourth album, For this We Fought the Battle of Ages, is in trying to listen to it without giving in to absolute hyperbole. Released through Profound Lore as the follow-up to the Salt Lake City five-piece’s 2013 moment of arrival, More Constant than the Gods, it is a triumph of songwriting and construction that feels so complete, showcases such breadth and depth throughout its six tracks, and that seems to reach into such a soulfulness, that one is inclined to apply only the grandest of statements to it. Taking inspiration from the 1924 Soviet dystopian novel We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, it sounds nonetheless personal to a point of being visceral, and that might be the element of influence it most shares with post-metal progenitors Neurosis.

It would be a mistake to call SubRosa‘s songwriting anything other than thoughtful, but it is by no means overly cerebral or cold in the way that a lot of post-metal can be, and in place of self-indulgence it engages with gorgeous arrangements of melodic strings and vocals, executed with poise, memorable lines and an emotional density that meshes in fluidity with the heft of tone found in the guitar, bass and drums.

With the lineup of guitarist/vocalist Rebecca Vernon, violinist/vocalist Sarah Pendleton, violinist/backing vocalist Kim Pack, bassist/vocalist Levi Hanna and drummer/engineer Andy Patterson (ex-Iota), as well as a host of guests adding flute, sax, French horn, vocals, etc. to the arrangements, SubRosa present a bold sonic vision, refined through a clear linear progression across their prior outings, 2008’s Strega debut on I Hate Records and their first for Profound Lore, 2011’s No Help for the Mighty Ones (review here), as well as More Constant than the Gods, but at the same time completely outstripping anything they’ve done before. For this We Fought the Battle of Ages is a significant achievement, pushing the band and their genre into yet-uncovered ground.

See what I mean about the hyperbole? It’s true though. With just six tracks (one of which is under two minutes long), For this We Fought the Battle of Ages spreads across a completely-earned 64 minutes. It begins with three side-consuming cuts, “Despair is a Siren” (15:25), “Wound of the Warden” (13:28) and “Black Majesty” (15:22), and each offers enough scope for a full-length album on its own. It’s not just about trading off loud parts and quiet parts — it’s about how SubRosa create worlds and use them to convey a resonant narrative.

On a more basic level, it’s also about the violins playing off the guitar, the intertwining vocal lines, Hanna‘s bassline in the beginning of “Wound of the Warden” and Patterson‘s Jason Roeder-worthy creativity on drums punctuating the dramas and meditations brought to bear, but principally it’s about those dramas themselves. One might look at the titles of the first three songs or “Il Cappio” (1:37), “Killing Rapture” (10:32) and “Troubled Cells” (7:38), which follow, and think the overriding mood would be pretty dark, and it’s true there’s no shortage throughout of tumult and longing and lines like those in the final movement of “Despair is a Siren” about sleeping in glass chambers, but particularly from “Il Cappio” onward, there’s also love.

SubRosa (Photo by Chris Martindale)

After a stunning apex in “Troubled Cells,” the album ends on the line “Paradise is a lie if you’re not by my side,” and that’s no less telling about the overall perspective from which it’s working than how “Black Majesty” stares into a lonely, calculating abyss or how “Wound of the Warden” seems to take on the voice of an oppressor and set about justifications that feel all too familiar and are no doubt intended to do just that. Even so, there’s beauty at hand in the violins of “Wound of the Warden” or in the rhythmic crunch of “Despair is a Siren,” and “Black Majesty” seems to provide a culmination for this duality in its theme, taking the beauty in darkness head-on. Through all this impeccably-mixed struggle, SubRosa retain their sense of dynamic and their command, Vernon‘s vocals a center around which all can churn and gather and, eventually dissipate.

“Il Cappio” — translated to “the noose” — begins what would likely be the final side of the 2LP and is delivered by Pendleton in Italian over what sounds like plucked violin strings. I don’t speak the language, and I don’t have a lyric sheet to go from, but it seems an awful lot like the noose in question might be love itself. Either way, “Il Cappio” works as more than interlude or as an introduction for “Killing Rapture” (though that has a verse in Italian as well, further linking the two), the opening roll of which seems to explode in comparison. Right around its midpoint, “Killing Rapture” transitions from that initial lumbering to a frenetic turbulence of drums, guitar, bass and violin, creating a tension that, while it develops a groove, seems to grip even tighter when the vocals return as the double-kick starts beneath. When it finally opens whatever release valve the pressure has been building behind, the effect is more relief than rush, SubRosa breaking for a moment before resuming the dirge that started them off as a finish, giving way to the quieter beginning of “Troubled Cells,” which brings vocals forward as it unfolds and rightly so.

The band often get tagged as being goth, and mournful melodies like that in “Troubled Cells” are probably part of why. That’s fine so long as one realizes that being “goth” doesn’t take away from their being progressive, or deeply affecting, or honest in a way that goth’s performative aspects might seem to contradict. In its final three minutes, “Troubled Cells” begins the push toward its and the record’s final crescendo, building a vocal call and response, meeting the lines “There is no greater good” with “Paradise is a lie if we have to burn you at the stake to get inside” before shifting to the already-noted “Paradise is a lie if you’re not by my side,” with one voice over just guitar as a closing statement before a reprise of guitar and violin from the intro end the song.

It is important to understand the massiveness of this work. Of the many impressive aspects of For this We Fought the Battle of Ages, its spectrum-consuming range might be the most pivotal, but SubRosa‘s delivery retains a raw emotive spirit that carries through the entire 64-minute run, instrumentally as well as vocally. That forms the core of the sonic identity; complex, dark, beautiful and crushing and utterly essential. Might be album of the year. Recommended.

SubRosa, For this We Fought the Battle of Ages (2016)

SubRosa on Thee Facebooks

SubRosa on Bandcamp

Profound Lore website

Profound Lore on Thee Facebooks

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Goya to Release Two-Song Nirvana Tribute Drain You / D-7

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 26th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Arizona trio Goya aren’t at all far removed from the June release of their latest EP, Forever Dead, Forever Stoned, but they’ve already got a new offering in the works, this time taking on two tracks in homage to grunge gods Nirvana. Apparently something of a bonding point for the members of the band — children of the ’90s, arise! — the two cuts “Drain You” and “D-7” (the latter originally by Wipers) will be issued via Opoponax Records as Goya‘s half of a split vinyl with Boston’s Aneurysm later this year or early next. For now, Goya have “Drain You” streaming as a lead-in for their performance this weekend among the riffy throng at Psycho Las Vegas, and you can check it out below.

From the PR wire:

goya drain you d7

GOYA: Arizona-Based Stoner Doom Trio To Release Limited Edition, Two-Song Nirvana Tribute; Band To Play Psycho Las Vegas This Weekend

2016 marks Phoenix, Arizona-based stoner doom trio GOYA’s fifth year as a band. After singer/vocalist Jeff Owens and drummer Nick Lose recently recruited Sonny DeCarlo on bass, they wanted to get into the studio as quickly as possible to celebrate what they could bring together. Knowing that it takes time and care to craft original material, they decided to record a couple of covers for the time being. All three members grew up in the ’90s, so the logical choice of band for them to cover was Nirvana, particularly with the twenty-fifth anniversary of Nirvana’s seminal album Nevermind full-length on the horizon.

After only a few rehearsals together, they entered Switchblade Sound in Tempe, Arizona to track “Drain You” and “D-7” with long-time friend and ex-GOYA bassist, Joe Asselin, who recorded their last album, Obelisk. Though “D-7” is originally by ’70s Portland punk band, Wipers, and was later covered by Nirvana, GOYA plays it in the true spirit of Nirvana. The tracks are mastered by Brad Boatright (Obituary, Sleep, Magrudergrind, Gatecreeper et al).

These songs will be released through Owens’ label Opoponax Records on a limited-to-100 lathe cut seven-inch on Saturday, September 24th. The band will have a very limited amount for sale at their appearance at Psycho Las Vegas THIS WEEKEND. “Drain You” will also appear in late 2016 or early 2017 as GOYA’s half of a split 7″ with Boston punk unit, Aneurysm, also to be released by Opoponax Records.

For preorders and to stream “Drain You” visit THIS LOCATION.

GOYA:
8/27/2016 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino @ Psycho Las Vegas – Las Vegas, NV
9/10/2016 Valley Bar – Phoenix, AZ

http://www.facebook.com/goyastoner
https://marijuana.bandcamp.com/album/drain-you-d-7
http://opoponax.bigcartel.com/product/goya-drain-you-d-7-lathe-cut

Goya, “Drain You”

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Sergio Ch. to Release New Album Aurora Next Month

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 26th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

A couple years ago, Sergio Chotsourian, formerly of Los Natas and currently of Soldati, Ararat, his Sergio Ch. solo work and South American Sludge Records issued a two-song release called Aurora. It was digital-only and I’m just going to assume that the new version of Aurora due to be issued as a CD/DL next month — on South American Sludge and Pirámide Records — is built off that. The opening title track, on the 2013 original, was over 19 minutes long, an experiment in drone looping topped off with echoing vocals, creating a pretty vast space. “El Herrero,” though much shorter, kept a similar mindset, just didn’t take it to quite the same lengths, blending it instead with Sergio Ch.‘s well established memorable songwriting.

I don’t know whether Aurora — the 2016 version — will work in the same way. If I had to guess, I’d imagine it will work along reasonably similar lines to how his 1974 full-length (review here) was issued first in a sort of demo form and then built out to be a complete album. The addition of other tracks here and instrumentation gives some clue as to the overall intent toward a fuller sound, but of course we won’t actually know until it’s out.

If you don’t already keep your eye on the South American Sludge Bandcamp page (linked below), it’s a treasure trove of underground heavy in a variety of styles from Argentina and beyond that’s easily worth your time and support. Just a word to the wise.

Album info follows. It’s in Spanish, but I’m pretty sure you can figure out what “guitarra” means, even if your language skills are as limited as mine:

sergio ch aurora

Sergio Ch. – Aurora [CD] [S.A.S. 050]

Tracklist:
01 Aurora
02 El Herrero
03 La Heroina
04 Aurora II
05 El Laud
06 El Llano

Sergio Ch. – Guitarra & Vocals
Milagros Arrom – Guitarra & Metalofon

Grabado y mezclado por Sergio Ch. en Death Studios
Masterizado por Patricio Claypole en Estudio El Attic
Artwork por Sergio Ch.
Producido por Sergio Ch.

South American Sludge Records, Pirámide Records (2016)

https://www.facebook.com/SASRECORDSARGENTINA/
https://sergiochblog.wordpress.com/south-american-sludge-records/
https://sasrecords.bandcamp.com/

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Ides of Gemini Sign to Rise Above Records; New Album Due in 2017

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 25th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Last heard from in April, Los Angeles heavy post-rockers Ides of Gemini had shifted their lineup and were setting out on a quick West Coast tour to hammer out new material. I guess they got there, because the band has now announced that they’ve signed with Rise Above Records for the follow-up to 2014’s Old World New Wave (review here), which they’ll record with Sanford Parker and release early next year.

So for Ides of Gemini, that’s two records on Neurot and one forthcoming on Rise Above. That’s a pretty impressive CV as far as label associations go. You’d think the band was really good or something. Oh wait, they are. Well, that’s another mystery solved.

From the PR wire:

ides of gemini photo by david lee dailey

IDES OF GEMINI Sign With Rise Above Records

Rise Above Records is delighted to announce the signing of Los Angeles based lampblack rock quartet, IDES OF GEMINI. Says label boss Lee Dorrian: “Having been a fan of theirs since the beginning and following them through all of their macabre twists and turns, it feels so great to have them joining the Rise Above family. It’s going to be a supreme association!”

IDES guitarist J Bennett adds: “We’re dying to hit the studio to record with our new lineup. This will absolutely be our best album by leaps and bounds – it’s got some of the heaviest tunes we’ve ever written, some of the least-heavy tunes we’ve ever written, and definitely some of the catchiest tunes we’ve ever written. There might even be a theme that links the songs together, but we’ll fill you in on all that later. Til then, stay tuned…”

The band will commence recording their third full-length album in LA with Sanford Parker and is scheduled for a Spring 2017 release. IDES OF GEMINI are also set to appear Psycho Vegas this weekend. In summary, Bennett concludes: “”We couldn’t be more thrilled to join Rise Above and their absolutely top-notch stable of artists. Lee obviously has impeccable taste, and our signing proves it!”

For More Info Visit:
https://www.facebook.com/IdesofgeminI/
http://idesofgemini.com

Ides of Gemini, Old World New Wave (2014)

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Darsombra, Polyvision: Dronenlightenment (Plus Full Album Stream)

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on August 25th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

darsombra polyvision

[Click play above to stream Darsombra’s Polyvision in full. Album is out Sept. 9 on Translation Loss.]

Last year, Baltimorean experimentalist duo Darsombra went on tour. Pretty much for the whole year. They played well over 100 shows on what they dubbed the “Three Legged Monster” tour — it took place over the course of three separate legs — and they played plenty of other shows besides. That nomadic existence seems to feed into the sense of revelry and freedom that one finds in listening to Polyvision, the two-piece’s latest studio full-length for Translation Loss Records and first since 2012’s Climax Community. Or at least that’s easy enough to read into the outing’s two extended, multi-movement component tracks, “Underworld” (21:45) and “From Insects… to Aliens (The Worms Turn)” (22:31).

Guitarist/keyboardist Brian Daniloski and keyboardist/vocalist/visual effects creator Ann Everton bring a clear sense of composition to both pieces, but there’s an undercurrent of improvisation atop which the building layers of samples, loops, synth and effects create their swirl, and where so much of drone/noise is hell-bent on post-apocalyptic desolation, the creation of all-gray spaces, Darsombra offer a full spectrum of sonic color across Polyvision. Moreover, there are moments where they sound truly and genuinely playful in what they do, Daniloski‘s guitar or the keys winding around celebratory figures in one track or the other, bringing about a spontaneous feeling moment of arrival — “We’re here now and isn’t it great here?” — that also would seem to fit with the presented-as-being-completely-on-a-whim turn to nomadic living that the band made in 2015. Have drone, will travel, will be glad to end up wherever.

That’s a simplification of the mindset, obviously, but the underlying point is that Polyvision feels unafraid to embrace joy as it moves through its complex and ritualized-feeling soundscapes. Not that it doesn’t also have its foreboding stretches, as any even vaguely drone release with a low tone will — soundtracks have conditioned us to hear things a certain way, even subconsciously — but though its two titles are somewhat dark in their themes, with the creepy vibe and strangeness of the construction of “From Insects… to Aliens (The Worms Turn)” and an “Underworld” traditionally being a place not known for its pleasant afternoons, it’s not long into Polyvision before Daniloski and Everton are exploring colorful, rich textures.

darsombra

It’s still fair to call Darsombra instrumental, but vocals do play a large role in setting the vibe, and that happens relatively quickly in the first movement of “Underworld”; voices almost choral loop in with undulating volume swells, fading in and out again, moving toward an end just before the five-minute mark where all goes quiet before the next wave starts with what seems to be both their voices leading to the establishing of a slow, patient rhythmic guitar figure around which the keys and a brightly progressive and extended guitar lead unfold. It’s here, making its way toward and past the midpoint of “Underworld” that Polyvision first and perhaps most effectively conveys the joy at root in its creation. It finds itself in a bouncing, almost child-like section of fuzzed-out keys and guitar — still with that original rhythm beneath; it doesn’t leave just yet — that receives due exploration before giving way to rolling waves, which is how “Underworld” ends. At the ocean. I’d assume that’s a field recording from the band, rather than a keyboard sample, but never fully knows. In either case, it’s hypnotic and signifies the kind of perpetualness Darsombra are looking to convey in their material as well as a peaceful moment to collect oneself before moving onto the second, longer track.

“From Insects… to Aliens (The Worms Turn)” finds itself building layers of proggy guitar, more active, more intense, with washes of cymbal added for effect in the first couple minutes. A swirling solo takes hold and winds its way into another seemingly simplistic progression around eight minutes in, but it gives way to lower rumbling undertones, if only momentarily before the guitar surges forward again. Though only part of Darsombra‘s broad approach, Daniloski‘s lead work isn’t to be undervalued. Aside from being technically proficient, it brings a rare spontaneity to what might commonly be thought of as a drone or noise record, neither of which is a style known for working off the cuff, adding to the atmosphere of positivity and basking in the spirit of an apparently ceaseless creative drive. Just past 15 minutes, Everton begins a vocal loop that is ultimately the introduction to the final movement of “From Insects… to Aliens (The Worms Turn)” and after a final crash of guitar, she’s backed by noise that indeed sounds like and may or may not be bugs, like crickets at night something from the forest.

That Darsombra would choose to end both of Polyvision‘s cuts with nature sounds — granted in the closer the human voice is still more prominent in its long fadeout — and one can’t help but wonder in light of the album’s title if the band isn’t trying to see multiple sides, and trying to show their audience multiple sides, of how humans interact with the world around them. Of course that’s speculation on my part, but if you take anything from it, take it as a sign of the depth of the evocation that the duo enact over the course of the album’s 44 minutes. If what they gleaned from those 100-plus days on the road together are the lessons they seem to be teaching here, then their time was well spent.

Darsombra on Thee Facebooks

Darsombra on Instagram

Darsombra on Bandcamp

Darsombra preorder at Translation Loss Records

Translation Loss on Thee Facebooks

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