Friday Full-Length: Karma to Burn, Karma to Burn

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 9th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Karma to Burn, Karma to Burn (1997)

They weren’t yet the band they wanted to be, and it’s important to acknowledge that at the outset. Seven years ago, when I spoke to now-former Roadrunner Records A&R head honcho Monte Conner about his label’s involvement with the makings of stoner rock in the late ’90s, Karma to Burn were bound to come up. In addition to having issued the Burn One Up: Music for Stoners compilation in 1997 which featured the West Virginian outfit alongside a very early appearance from Queens of the Stone Age (with a different singer), as well as The Heads, Gnu, Sleep, Blind Dog, Fu Manchu, Spiritual Beggars, Slaprocket and others, though they were of course known more as a metal label through releasing the likes of Type O Negative, Life of Agony, Fear Factory and Sepultura at the time, Roadrunner was the party responsible for bringing Karma to Burn‘s self-titled debut to public attention — part of a kind of under-the-underground involvement in what was then a burgeoning post-Kyuss movement of heavy rock. In the almost two decades since its release, and of course in light of all the instrumental work the band has done since, the narrative about the label forcing them to get a singer has become an essential piece of context. Here’s what Conner had to say in 2009:

“Basically, we saw Karma to Burn for the first time here in New York at a club called Brownies, myself and Howie Abrams, the guy who led the charge in signing the band. We saw them as an instrumental trio and were just absolutely floored at the power. You could listen to Karma to Burn even without vocals and it was still captivating, at least for one record. It might wear thin after a while, especially with songs called ‘Thirty-Nine,’ ‘Forty,’ ‘Forty-Two,’ it’s a little hard to keep track at that point.

But we did see Karma and we were absolutely floored and we thought, ‘God, if these guys get a singer there’s gonna be no stopping them!’ At the time we signed the band, the whole courtship process and signing the band, the band at that point did want to get a singer and agreed to get a singer, and it was only after frustration of not finding someone that I think the band realized, ‘Hey, maybe we’re better without a singer, we’re more unique this way, we don’t need a singer.’

At that point, they told us ‘No singer,’ and we were objecting because we signed them with the intention of getting a singer, and as I said, that was laid out from the beginning and when we signed them, they said, ‘Yes, we are going to get a singer.’ So they kind of changed the game on us, and they had already recorded the entire record prior to having a singer, figuring, ‘We’ll get the singer and he’ll just go in and lay down the tracks.’ Eventually, due to pressure from us, the band still couldn’t find a singer and had a local friend of theirs, Jason Jarosz, come in and put down vocals.

Not traditional vocals at all, but these really sinister, kind of strange — as you can hear on the record — kind of weird vocals, that we thought were cool, even though they were not typical vocals at all. It kind of gave the whole thing an eerie, avant garde feeling. So we accepted it, we were okay with it, but I think in the end, it really wasn’t the type of vocals we imagined. I think we were settling at that point, just because we wanted to get the record out.

The band went along with it to appease us, but in the end I don’t think they liked this guy’s vocals. They were very rebellious and were like, ‘Fuck this, we don’t want a singer,’ so they basically parted ways with this guy and decided to continue on as an instrumental band and at that point we weren’t interested in continuing, so we dropped them…” — Monte Conner (more here)

I think my favorite part about that entire quote is “They were very rebellious,” since it basically encapsulates the entire career of Karma to Burn and particularly their sole remaining founder, guitarist Will Mecum, whose perspective seems to have always been a middle finger in the face of anyone who’s going to say otherwise on just about any issue. I don’t know if I’ve ever spoken about the band, who released the Mountain Czar EP (review here) and toured with The Obsessed this year without calling their sound “bullshit-free,” and indeed, I consider that to be their defining sonic feature.

They are and have for a long time been the straightest line to heavy rock and roll, and while records like 1999’s Wild Wonderful Purgatory and 2001’s Almost Heathen would provide the defining hours for their approach — Mecum along with bassist Rich Mullins and drummer Rob Oswald — the self-titled has always been by its very nature a standout from everything that followed it. Jarosz‘s vocals, quieter and less burly than what, say, Sixty Watt Shaman were doing at the time, had an attitude all their own, and while one might find some politically suspect lyrics in “Mt. Penetrator,” there’s an underlying sad blue-collar poetry in the lyrics that gets lost in a lot of modern Southern rock, which is more about the boozing, the womanizing, the party-as-escape. Karma to Burn‘s self-titled, which also introduced the band’s signature numbered instrumentals with “Eight,” “Thirteen” and “Six” after the landmark hook of opener “Ma Petite Mort,” undercut that impulse to a degree and came across as an emotionally richer and somewhat more honest offering because of it.

Maybe don’t tell that to the band. In 2012, they’d revisit this material and release it completely instrumental as Slight Reprise, a fitting swansong for the then-reformed Mecum/Mullins/Oswald lineup. Mecum has continued to carry the band forward, working now with a strong European focus and the rhythm section of bassist Eric Clutter and drummer Evan Devine. Their last full-length was 2014’s Arch Stanton (review here) — Clutter was not yet in the lineup — but they’ve been reborn as a touring act. This fall, they made the rounds in Europe and played Desertfest in Athens as well as Keep it Low, and having been fortunate enough to see them this summer at Maryland Doom Fest (review here), I can attest to the drive and push they emit from a stage being as middle-finger as ever.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

How was your week? Mine went by in a blur of corporately-tinged workflow process acronyms — letters that meant nothing to me until a few months ago (and some that still don’t). Made me think maybe I should come up with important-sounding abbreviations for what I do here. “Why did you get up at 5AM?” “I had a big RWM to get through,” where all RWM means is “review-writing in the morning.” Or, more appropriately, “I had to finish the FFL.” Friday Full-Length.

You get the idea.

However, since I don’t really talk about the site with anyone, it would pretty much be an inside joke with myself, and that seems kind of sad in this context.

Before I forget — THANK YOU to everyone who has submitted their best-of 2016 list so far to the Year-End Poll. If you haven’t yet, please do. As of right now, the tally stands at 370 submissions. I hope by the end of the weekend to pass 388, which was last year’s total for the entire month of December. Not bad for being less than half the time. I am humbled and deeply grateful.

You might’ve noticed the Album Covers that Kicked Ass in 2016 list didn’t go up this week. I had crazytimes at the office and though the piece about that Comet Control track being my favorite song of the year turned out to be a doozy in its own right, it required much less time on the back end than tracking down and laying out different art jpegs would. I’ll get to work on it this weekend — I also have some fest writeups to do — and have it up on Monday, disaster pending.

Speaking of “subject to change,” here’s the rest of what’s in the ol’ notes for next week:

Mon.: Art list (who knew?) and new video from Sun Blood Stories. Don’t miss either of them.
Tue.: News on the SonicBlast Moledo fest and new recordings from Australia’s Merchant, an album stream from Elbrus and video from Crippled Black Phoenix. Don’t miss any of that either.
Wed.: Track premiere from Indian metallers Rudra.
Thu.: Review of the new Sgt. Sunshine.
Fri.: Review of the new T.G. Olson.

We get kind of tentative there toward the end of the week, and I’m basically doing myself favors at this point in terms of picking what I want to write about. Anytime you see me covering something from T.G. Olson or his main outfit, Across Tundras, you can pretty much guess that I’m doing so in order to maximize enjoyment of the day. Not that I don’t dig writing about most of what I write about — no point to the site otherwise — but as you know if you’ve already made out your top 20 and turned it in for the Year-End Poll, these things are relative.

Hey, have a great weekend, alright? Please do that.

Largely at the insistence of The Patient Mrs., I went ahead and took Monday off from work (will make sure to put up my “OOO”). She rather correctly asserted that I needed a three-day weekend. No argument, I just don’t get paid for the time I don’t work, so it’s money out of my pocket to stay home. Still, money ain’t everything and sometimes those hours are worth their weight in gold. So I’ll be around. In my pajamas. Sitting on ass. Hopefully playing Final Fantasy. And writing. And that’s my plan.

Whatever you’re up to, please be safe and have a great time. Thanks for reading this long-ass post if you have, and we’ll see you back here Monday. In the meantime, please check out the forum and radio stream.

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Lord Loud Post “Tune In” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 8th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

lord-loud-photo-by-jon-shoer

I guess when you live in L.A. it might be easier to put together a professional-looking music video than when you’re, say, anywhere else on the planet. Heavy noise duo Lord Loud take full advantage of that ability with their new clip from “Tune In,” breaking out Atari aesthetics and some old tube televisions to get their point across while raging out through the shortest song on their 2015 In EP, released on tape via New Mexico’s King Volume Records as one of three offerings in an all-cassette boxed set that has me very seriously contemplating a $19 purchase. Because it looks frickin’ awesome and any label keen enough to snag these dudes earns a certain amount of immediate trust on my part. If you’re wondering, the other two bands in the set are doomers Lord Mountain, from Santa Rosa, California, and Brooklyn instru-sludgers Dead Things.

As regards Lord Loud, and as regards “Tune In,” it’s rife with no-nonsense Stoogesery that, on the In EP, complements the broader-ranging tripout of “Living Mystery” with a sense of edge that carries through the material surrounding. That is to say, while it’s only under two minutes long and follows the somewhat-similarly-minded handclap-laden garage-ism of “Searching for the Thief,” the effect “Tune In” has as the centerpiece lasts into “No Regard” and the two longer cuts that end In, “Living Mystery” and the subsequent “Silent Spoken.” Since this is my first time hearing the band or the EP, it makes for a cool way to be introduced, though if you’re like me and haven’t fully dug into the release yet — or bought that tape! — you should be aware that, while righteous, it doesn’t necessarily represent the entirety of the thing, despite the thing being a relatively quick 20 minutes long.

If your thing is name-your-price downloads — and at this point I find it hard to imagine it isn’t, because that’s the world we live in — in addition to the tape boxed set, Lord Loud have In generously available as one via their Bandcamp.

You’ll find that link at the bottom of this post and the video for “Tune In” below, which I hope you enjoy:

Lord Loud, “Tune In” official video

“Tune In” song written and performed by Lord Loud
Single off their “In” EP out on King Volume Records!

Chris Allison – Guitar/Vocals
Michael Feld – Drums/Vocals
Produced and mastered by Geoff Halliday

Tape, Full Digital EP, and single track available for purchase at http://lordloudmusic.bandcamp.com

Lord Loud on Thee Facebooks

Lord Loud on Bandcamp

King Volume Records webstore

King Volume Records on Bandcamp

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Deadpeach Post Video for “Traffic” (NSFW); Vinyl Sale on Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 8th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

deadpeach

Look, I’m just a caveman. It seems like maybe it’s been a while since Italian heavy psych rockers Deadpeach posted the video below for this track from their 2014 album, Aurum (review here), but I happen to think it’s never too late to correct an oversight — I’ve gone back into posts and fixed typos half a decade old, if you want proof — so if you want to put the “Traffic” video under the heading of ‘better than never,’ that’s cool by me. The timing actually works out decently well for the clip to come to my attention, since Deadpeach have a vinyl sale going on now for Aurum and their other two full-lengths through their Bandcamp, about which you can read more below.

As for “Traffic” itself, as someone who’s spent a good deal of 2016 sitting in it, I can safely say the song and its video are both a decidedly more pleasant experience than the name might convey. The clip is taken from public domain art footage, but there’s still nudity, so it gets the NSFW tag above — someone walking by your desk, say, might not have the same aesthetic or contextual appreciation — but even if you click play and listen to the track while doing something else, its instrumental flow is worth digging into for sure and makes the process easier through natural tones and a fluid, subdued psychedelic push. Deadpeach, it seems, aren’t so much issuing challenges as invitations. Dress casual. Come as you are.

It’s that kind of party, which I guess makes me fashionably late in getting it posted.

Dig into “Traffic” below, and please enjoy:

Deadpeach, “Traffic” official video

The video was filmed in Milan at the Museum of the 900, where there are exhibited works ranging from: Futurism, Metaphysical, Transavanguardia. The images of the ‘streap tease’ are stock image of archive.org. Videos and music of Deadpeach.

VINYLS 12″
Album “Psycle” on PICTURE DISK artwork by Malleus
Album “2” on red vinyl artwork by Loreprod
Album “Aurum” on trasparent ‘peach’ color artwork by Epicproblems

Instead of 62 € you will pay 50 euro. You will also receive the code of the 3 albums for unlimited streaming of the album via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality downloads in MP3, FLAC and more. You will receive immediately the code of album Aurum, the codes of the other two albums will be included in the package with vinyl. For free you will also receive the code of the EP ‘old fuzz generation.”

Deadpeach on Bandcamp

Deadpeach website

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Kooba Tercu Post “Batman” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 7th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

kooba-tercu-700

Sometimes life is weird. Like the parts of it when you listen to the noise-jazz psychedelic wash of Athenian outfit Kooba Tercu. Those are definitely some strange times. The band, who may or may not represent themselves in the entirety of a single character — referenced below as the disaffected Johnny Tercu — released their self-titled debut album last year in a vinyl edition of 250 LPs, and operated immediately in a wide swath of sonic influences, from jagged indie to worldly percussive tendencies and well beyond into a number of approaches to psychedelia. I’m not sure all of it was completely under control, but neither am I sure it was supposed to be.

What Kooba Tercu made most plain in their debut — a track from which was featured in a podcast here — was that there’s very little that’s off the table, rhythmically, melodically or otherwise in their arrangements. Yet to listen to the skronk bounce of opener “Ukunta” or the later punker blast of “Spit Bucket,” the album doesn’t sound overbaked or overthought. Part of that might stem from the band recording (mostly) live, but as one watches the vague imagery take cohesive form much like the song itself in their new video for “Batman,” I think it makes an eerie kind of sense within the context they establish. And by that I basically mean it makes no sense but the problem is expecting that it would. Free your mind. Then hit play.

Then, if you’re so inclined, you can hit up Kooba Tercu‘s Bandcamp (linked below), where the album is currently a name-your-price download. Don’t expect “Batman,” which is mostly instrumental, to speak for the entirety of the record, because it won’t, but it does encapsulate some of the anti-genre mentality, and the blown-out fuzz that comes to dominate later in the track is worth the price of admission on its own. What, if anything, it has to do with the DC Comics character, I haven’t a clue, but if you’ve heard them before or if you haven’t, I hope you dig it.

Have at you:

Kooba Tercu, “Batman” official video

Johnny Tercu and his crew spend time in a moist, rat & cockroach infested basement playing something loud and heavy. He ventures pointlessly into nothingness with the same sense of no future as most people in Athens these days.

After endless hours of jamming, Kooba Tercu has distilled the ideas developed over a couple of years in ten songs resulting in something that sounds incredibly familiar but maybe not quite like anything you’ve heard before.

Recorded live. And then overdubs.

Kooba Tercu on Thee Facebooks

Kooba Tercu on Bandcamp

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Year of the Goat Premiere Lyric Video for “Song of Winter”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 5th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

year-of-the-goat-2

Swedish cultists Year of the Goat are getting ready to release their new seven-incher Song of Winter this Friday, Dec. 9, via Napalm Records. They made their debut in 2015 through the same imprint with their second full-length, The Unspeakable, and with the leadoff A-side of the single, they’re moving forward from that album toward their next one and an early-2017 push that will find them on the road in Jan./Feb. alongside countrymen/labelmate doomers The Order of Israfel and Norwegian heavy-hitters Tombstones, keeping their momentum going from the last few years and perhaps making sure the proper demons are exorcized and/or represented in new material before they hit the studio to bring their third album to fruition.

One can hear traces of the original version of “Song of Winter” in Year of the Goat‘s version. Released by Parisian singer/actress/model Francoise Hardy on 1969’s One-Nine-Seven-Zero, it has a duly haunting melody bolstered by the Norrköping six-piece’s arrangement of guitar and Mellotron and a light, poetic simplicity to the lyrics that speaks to the era from which it comes and resonates even now, the better part of half a century later. Or maybe I’m just a sucker for any song that features lines like, “I’m a misty rainbow.” In any case, “Song of Winter” earns its art deco cover, and if it’s offering a glimpse at where Year of the Goat might be headed, then the modern sensibility they bring to the classic structure bodes well to say the least. Presumably we’ll see how it all works out sometime before the end of 2017.

The band offers some insight on “Song of Winter” under the lyric video, which you’ll find below. Also down there are the dates for the aforementioned tour, should you happen to be or find yourself in that part of the world when it’s happening.

Please enjoy:

Year of the Goat, “Song of Winter” lyric video

Year of the Goat on “Song of Winter”:

“For many years Francoise Hardy has been part of our playlist while on the road. As soon as ‘Song of Winter’ played, the thought that we really should do a cover of it at some point always presented itself. Lyrically we find it going very well with the theme of our first album and also with the one we’re planning at the moment. The B-side on the other hand lyrically draws more towards our second album, The Unspeakable. One could probably say that the wonderful and talented Francoise Hardy is helping us build a bridge between our last album and the one to come.”

Year of the Goat, “Song of Winter” limited gold 7″
1. Song of Winter (Side A
2. Strange Shadows (Side B)

Strictly Limited Napalm Records Mailorder Edition to 200 Copies in GOLDEN Vinyl. EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE VIA THE NAPALM RECORDS MAILORDER AND ONLINE STORE.

Year of the Goat European tour w/ The Order of Israfel & Tombstones:
28.01.17 DE – Berlin / Badehaus
29.01.17 DE – Osnabrück / Bastard Club
30.01.17 DE – Hamburg / Hafenklang
31.01.17 DE – Wiesbaden / Schlachthof
01.02.17 NL – Arnhem / Willemeen
02.02.17 UK – London / Underworld
04.02.17 TBA
06.02.17 CH – Olten / Coq D’Or
07.02.17 IT – Milano / Lo Fi
08.02.17 DE – Munich / Backstage
09.02.17 AT – Vienna / Viper Room
10.02.17 DE – Leipzig / UT Connewitz
11.02.17 DE – Siegen / Vortex

Year of the Goat is:
Thomas Sabbathi – vocals, guitar
Jonas Mattsson – guitar
Don Palmroos – guitar
Fredrik Hellerström – drums
Joona Hassinen – bass
Pope – mellotron, vocals

Year of the Goat at Napalm Records

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Friday Full-Length: Raging Slab, Raging Slab

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 2nd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Raging Slab, Raging Slab (1989)

If you’re the sort of person who likes a clean, clear narrative to your rock and roll history, you’ll probably want to avoid Raging Slab. An anomaly if ever there was one, here was a band based out of New York City playing Southern-style heavy boogie rock… who released their first album in 1987. And then signed to a major label! If you can make any sense of it or put it into any kind of discernible context, go for it. It’s almost like Raging Slab were sent back from the future to disrupt the timeline, is how out of place they were for their day and age. And yet, listening to their 1989 self-titled — released by RCA Records as the follow-up to ’87’s charmingly-dubbed Assmaster debut — one can hear flashes of the era in the semi-metallic “Shiny Mama” (on which Ray Gillen provides backing vocals) and in the post-Motörhead freight-train progression of “Get off My Jollies.” But at its core, Raging Slab is a work of ’70s loyalism that was as much ahead of its time as it was behind it. The band, founded by guitarists Greg Strzempka (also vocals and songwriting) and Elyse Steinman, here featured bassist Alec Morton, lead guitarist Mark Middleton and drummers Tony Scaglione (everything but “Get off My Jollies”) and Steve “Doc Killdrums” Wacholz (“Get off My Jollies”) — though credited in the liner and in the cover photography one finds Bob Pantella, who’d go on to join Monster Magnet, The Atomic Bitchwax, etc. — no doubt earned some sideways glances in the heyday of glam, but in hindsight, it’s just as easy to read their work as boldly defying both the mainstream and the underground of its day.

To wit, the aforementioned glam. Imagine Raging Slab coming out the same year as Mötley Crüe‘s Dr. Feelgood. Sure, there was plenty of metal to be had — the NWOBHM had arguably crested some years earlier, but thrash had by then hit its stride as America’s major contribution to a heavy metal aesthetic. Doom festered in the likes of Saint VitusThe Obsessed, and Cathedral, but while Molly Hatchet and ZZ Top were still around, they were more Southern than heavy, and Raging Slab were more heavy than they were metal. And elsewhere in the underground, the likes of Earth, the Melvins and Nirvana were solidifying what would in a couple years break out internationally as grunge. Raging Slab didn’t fit there either. In a self-written 1996 bio, they called themselves, “TOO hard for country and western fans, TOO slow for thrash fans, TOO cerebral for hard rock fans and TOO rock and roll for alternative fans.” All true. The self-titled tells that story in cuts like “Geronimo” and “Bent for Silver,” which are too brazen in their hooks to be chic in an underground sense and too weighted to really be pop or country rock. Hell, to listen to opener “Don’t Dog Me,” it’s a cut that today would be right at home in the Ripple Music lineup. 27 years ago, I guess it wasn’t so easy to place.

However they wound up on a label like RCA, they did, and they’d go on to work with Rick Rubin‘s Def American/American Recordings on subsequent outings, Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert (1993) and Sing Monkey Sing! (1996), but in the meantime, a generational shift and the arrival of bands like Corrosion of Conformity — whose Deliverance came out five years after Raging Slab, in 1994 — working under a Southern heavy influence kept wider commercial success elusive, and Raging Slab faded for a time. The turn of the century found them returned to activity on Tee Pee Records with 2001’s The Dealer and the next year’s Pronounced Eat Shit, but apart from a compilation appearance here and there — they notably took on Grand Funk Railroad‘s “We’re an American Band” for Small Stone‘s first installment of Sucking the ’70s in 2002 — that would be their swansong. Strzempka found a home in Sweden’s Backdraft, and there were rumors of another Raging Slab resurgence and a new album as part of that, but a decade later, it’s yet to surface.

Never say never in rock and roll though. If you dig the self-titled, it was reissued in ’09 on Rock Candy Records, and Assmaster also saw a re-press in 2013 through Cherry Red with a bunch of bonus material, including the True Death EP from 1989.

Whether you know this one or not, I hope you enjoy.

Man, this week can’t fuck off fast enough to suit my tastes. Like here’s the week fucking off as fast as it possibly can and here’s me standing with a stopwatch shaking my head going, “Not even close, yo.”

Awful.

Let’s be optimistic together. 2016’s almost over, and we don’t yet know what fresh, astounding lows the New Year will bring.

Hey, we got over 125 entries in the first day of the Top 20 of 2016 Year-End Poll. That legitimately ruled. Made my week, actually. I was nervous. If you contributed a list, thanks. If not yet, please do. Any help sharing the link is also greatly valued.

In the notes for next week:

Mon: Album stream for Leafy and a Year of the Goat video premiere.
Tue: Albinö Rhinö album stream and the new Lord Loud video.
Wed: A list of 10 album covers that kicked ass in 2016. Because art is fun and talking about it is a fun way to kick off list season.
Thu: A review of The Second Coming of Heavy, Chapter 4.
Fri: Track stream from a Denver band I’m not sure I’m allowed yet to name.

Gonna be a good one. This week should’ve been a good one too. The problem is me. I’m the problem.

It’s okay though. I’ve been down this road before. Gonna spend the next couple days drinking coffee leisurely, playing Final Fantasy XV and hanging out with Slevin, who’s coming north for a visit. It’ll be nice to see him. It always is.

I sincerely hope your week was better than mine and that your weekend is no less stellar. Be safe and have fun, and please make time to check out the forum and the radio stream.

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Black Moon Circle’s Psychedelic Lightshow Featured in “The Head” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 30th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

black-moon-circle-with-dr-space

Among the several thrills this year has held for me when it comes to watching bands on a stage, the chance to see Norwegian heavy psych rockers Black Moon Circle perform at Roadburn 2016 alongside their compatriot Scott “Dr. Space” Heller of Øresund Space Collective and with visual accompaniment in the form of a live psychedelic oil show from Simon W. Gullikstad is pretty high on the list. It was late at night, and the languid, trippy vibe at the smaller venue Extase was just the thing to cap a long day with a bit of go-ahead-and-get-lost-in-it wash effects wash and nod-ready groove. I’d say I was into it, but that would probably be underselling the experience. It was the right place to be and at the right time.

The Trondheim band’s improvisational side was highlighted with the recent release of The Studio Jams Vol. II (review here), which arrived under the subheading of “The Serpent” as a two-sided LP drawing forth from the well of a single extended jam. Like the aforementioned Roadburn set, the Stickman/Crispin Glover Records release too featured Dr. Space alongside the core trio of guitarist Vemund Engan, bassist Øyvin Engan and drummer Per Andreas Gulbrandsen, and its cover art was indeed a still of Gullikstad‘s work.

Sensing a theme? Good, because the band’s new video for “The Head” — the 24-minute A-side of The Studio Jams Vol. II — also features Gullikstad in his gooey element. Shot on a wall outside Black Moon Circle‘s practice space — I guess any wall would do, really — it’s a longform sampling of both the lysergic explorations the band has to offer and the visual immersion that’s made to accompany. Want to put it on fullscreen and just let it play out? Yeah, I think that might be a good impulse to follow.

Please dig in below, and enjoy:

Black Moon Circle, “The Head” official video

The track is taken from the album The Studio Jams Vol II by Black Moon Circle. The visual arts, water, oil & colors, were performed by Simon W. Gullikstad and the video was filmed by Eivind Stuevold in the hall outside of our rehearsal area.

Black Moon Circle on Bandcamp

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Crispin Glover Records website

Stickman Records website

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Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters Sign to Riff Rock Records; Premiere “Mother Chub” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 29th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

chubby-thunderous-bad-kush-masters-700

Man, that new Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters video must really be something if they taped over the Beavis and Butt-Head appearance on Dave Letterman to save it. The theme? The ’90s. A distinct VHS grit pervades the clip for “Mother Chub,” from the London trio’s 2015 debut EP, Earth Hog (review here), and as the band get down like they’re in a Dr. Dre video from 1993, that could hardly be more appropriate.

You’ll note the bounce gesture — perfectly timed — the slow-motion mugging for the camera, and the general freaking out that Chubby Thunderous and a slew of similarly corpsepainted, tye-dyed, headbanging compatriots engage. It’s called charm, kids. Charm and riffs, and the UK party sludgers have both in spades.

In addition to premiering the “Mother Chub” video, today Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters — the three-piece of guitarist/vocalist Owen Carty, bassist Will Hart and drummer Mark Buckwell — announce they’ve signed with Riff Rock Records for their next release. They’ll have a split out early in 2017 and after that set to work on their debut full-length.

Being picked up by Riff Rock makes them labelmates to Vodun, with whom they’d seem to share an affinity for coldcream as well as tonal heft. Chubby Thunderous are maybe a little less prone to taking themselves seriously, but as “Mother Chub,” which was the penultimate of the five tracks on Earth Hog and the longest of them (also featured on a Riff Rock compilation last summer; streamed here), demonstrates, they’re not just screwing around either.

If you’re not looking forward to an album from these cats, you should be, and “Mother Chub” offers plenty of reasons why.

The band was kind enough to comment on signing to Riff Rock Records. Their words follow the video below.

Please enjoy:

Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters, “Mother Chub” official video

Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters on Signing to Riff Rock Records:

“We’re psyched and honoured to be joining Riff Rock Records. They totally get that we’re trying to do something a little different with the band… We want to create a rad vibe that’s a little less serious and hopefully a lot of fun. If we can convince one diehard metal fan to buy a tie-dye t-shirt at every show then that’s our job done. We have a split EP coming out around the start of next year with some good friends of ours and then we’ll focus on finishing our first full album. Love ‘n Kush!”

Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters live:
Dec 03 The Unicorn Camden, UK
Dec 11 The Bullingdon Oxford, UK
Feb 04 DROP The Dumbulls Gallery Liverpool, UK

Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters on Thee Facebooks

Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters on Bandcamp

Riff Rock Records on Thee Facebooks

Riff Rock Records on Twitter

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