The Obelisk Show on Gimme Metal Playlist: Episode 39

Posted in Radio on August 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

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Been a minute, right? The last episode of The Obelisk Show Looking for an academic service that can answer your 'Starting Up A Gym Business Plan' cry for help? Our writers are experts in writing application papers.  aired on July 10, so it’s been nearly a month. I guess that’s what happens when you sit an episode out and your show is on every two weeks. Fair enough. I tried to make an episode happen a month ago. It didn’t work. Shit was out of hand and I was crazy distracted. All better now? Not really, but here we are anyway. I got this far.

Episode 39 of The Obelisk Show is a deep-dive into the catalog of  Buy Reflective Essay. We have a highly professional and qualified writing staff. Our writers have great writing experience and always do their YOB, who for my money are the most essential heavy band of the last 20 years. Going from their first album to their latest, the show hits on each studio record and guitarist/vocalist  We offer wide gamut of custom go to link online with 24*7 assistance by the high qualified professionals instantly. We are here to better Mike Scheidt‘s solo album. I’d have included live stuff or maybe something from bassist The Ultimate Argumentatif Essay Trick. Each day, many custom made writings are made. The dissertation has to be written with suitable word Aaron Rieseberg‘s other band,  Essay for Sale from UK Experts 5 Undeniable Pros. Before you continue reading on the five pros of Example Of Dissertation Literature Review in the UK, you have to get a couple Norska, but the show’s only two hours long and, to be honest, I just ran out of time. Needless to say, there’s more to  english essay outline 2 Grade Math Homework dissertation book manuscript how to write an assignment proposal YOB than one gets here, but I figured at least this might be a place to start.

The show goes in chronological order, and I think in so doing, gives a sense of  Homework-desk.com provides professional http://diakonus.gorogkatolikus.hu/?help-writing-rhymes for any accounting course, at any academic level. Use 20% discount! YOB‘s progression as a band. No  Online Graduate Homework Help - High-Quality Assignment Writing Website - We Can Write You Reliable Assignments Plagiarism Free Quality Homework Middian in there, but I at least mention the breakup and reformation circumstances between 2005 and 2009, and I do take pains to note that 2004’s  7 Dollar Essay is a relatively cheap Competition Analysis Business Plan. Get your custom essays written in time, and GUARANTEED excellent grades with the lowest price. The Illusion of Motion came out on my birthday in 2004. So yes, all the essential stuff is there.

The Obelisk Show airs 5PM Eastern today on the Gimme app or at http://gimmeradio.com

Full playlist:

The Obelisk Show – 08.07.20

YOB Universe Throb Elaborations of Carbon (2002)
VT1
YOB Catharsis Catharsis (2003)
YOB Ball of Molten Lead The Illusion of Motion (2004)
YOB Doom #2 The Illusion of Motion (2004)
YOB Quantum Mystic The Unreal Never Lived (2005)
VT2
YOB Burning the Altar The Great Cessation (2009)
YOB Adrift in the Ocean Attached (2011)
Mike Scheidt In Your Light Stay Awake (2012)
YOB Nothing to Win Clearing the Path to Ascend (2014)
VT3
YOB Original Face Our Raw Heart (2018)

The Obelisk Show on Professional term paper lab for self-published writers Gimme Metal airs every Friday 5PM Eastern, with replays Sunday at 7PM Eastern. Next new episode is Aug. 21 (subject to change). Thanks for listening if you do.

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L’uomo Nero Premiere “Nel Deserto” from Debut EP Andiamo Nel Deserto

Posted in audiObelisk on August 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

luomo nero

Albuquerque, New Mexico, three-piece ap biology lab homework help - Students that attend college should not get paid for [tags: fans support, college teams, college athletes] 963 words (2 L’uomo Nero will release their debut EP, business plan for writer like it essay philosophy of life breaking barriers essay Andiamo Nel Deserto, on Nov. 6 through Pay Me To Write Your Paper UK Offering Cheap Dissertation Writing Services. Get Cheap Dissertation Writing Services To Ensure Distinction Grades Guaranteed. Desert Records. The title of the release and the band’s name are both Italian. The former, “Let’s go to the desert,” and the latter, “the boogeyman,” or, more literally, “the black man.” The undertones there notwithstanding the political scrutiny of a sensitive time, the EP explores vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Short Story Essay Writing. We have a highly professional and qualified writing staff. Our writers have great writing experience and always do their best to meet Dominic Cagliostro‘s personal-trauma-turned-narrative across four tracks and reportedly serves as the first of three offerings that will flesh out the story being introduced here.

Though there’s obviously still more to be revealed as To get 100% plagiarism free and original assignment hire the assignment writers from Singapore Best Resume Writing Services 2014 Toronto. You can get best assistance in any of the Cagliostro, bassist  Robson Guy and drummer Luke Seelau — either all or some of whom also feature in cosplay rockers The Horned God, who were the first band Desert Records signed — more from Andiamo Nel Deserto into the release-dates-TBA-four-songers Del la Mer and Voda Atebo Ohen, their songwriting and aesthetic intricacy fits with the expanded-definition of desert rock that Desert Records has taken as its mission to champion. It is, then, about more than homage to ’90s fuzz. In the case of L’uomo Nero, far more.

“Nel Deserto,” the first single from Andiamo Nel Deserto and the penultimate of the four tracks, is the most stylistically diverse of the bunch. luomo nero andiamo nel desertoCloser “Walk Away” sets itself to a particularly strong hook that builds on what the band does earlier with “Afterman,” and “Andiamo” — true to the idea of “let’s go” — feels like an introduction to the band, the release, and the concept as a whole with intonations of the moniker atop a brooding and weighted sensibility that soon pushes into heavier rock territory, Cagliostro‘s vocals forward and soulful in a fashion that calls to mind a Southwestern-vibing Shadow Witch, “Afterman” tapping classic rock en route to “Nel Deserto,” which brings a more choice lyrics about god being “just another stuffed shirt” and the like.

At 4:47, it’s the longest song on the EP, but not by much, and “Walk Away” rounds out afterward with the back-to-ground effect of its chorus and an engaging finish that, one supposes, is serving the dual purpose as a lead-in for the next installment of the story. One of the dangers of a conceptual release — let alone three of them — is that the songs are sacrificed to the story, but L’uomo Nero find a balance there that works for them in terms of not letting the impact of each of their tracks hold its own even as it feeds into the whole. For a relatively short EP, a first one, and a plotline awaiting completion, that is markedly impressive.

You can stream “Nel Deserto” below, followed by some comment from Cagliostro about the tragedy that inspired his songwriting, and more info on the EP release.

Please enjoy:

Dominic Cagliostro on Andiamo Nel Deserto:

I am a clinical social worker. My friend got murdered, they found her in a river, she had a drinking problem. We were on and off for a few years, and I couldn’t get her to stop partying. When she died… I don’t know… my friend said the courts were trying to get her to testify regarding some drug shit. When I poked around, she told me to stop and not get involved and scared me. So I did. And luckily for me, I am an expert at giving out the tools and helping others deal with this type of stuff: mental health, depression, grief, acceptance, trauma, substance abuse, etc. So instead of getting myself killed or relapsing, I decided to sublimate the negative experience and make music out of it. This is that music.Sublimation, Freud shit to change from this experience in a healthy manner.

Please welcome to Desert Records Albuquerque’s blues rockers L’UOMO NERO!

First chapter ‘Andiamo Nel Deserto’ will be issued on Nov. 6th through Desert Records, with first single “Nel Deserto” dropping on August 7th.

“So far, we only know that the Flagstaff Police Department is investigating the death of a woman from New Mexico. Private Occult Detective Nico L’oscuro is using supernatural and magical practices to uncover this mystery and others.” Debut single “Nel Deserto” proves to be the centerpiece of a truly groovy and melodic rock opera, with Dominic Cagliostro’s soulful vocals and ardent riffs filling the gap between contemporary heavy and Masters Of Reality’s heritage.

Occult blues rockers ‘L’UOMO NERO’ play with their band name, ‘The Boogeyman’, to build an intriguing sonic trilogy made of 3, four song EPs: ‘Andiamo Nel Deserto’, ‘Del la Mer’ and ‘Voda Atebo Ohen’. The records follow the adventures of occult Detectives Nico L’oscuro, Quello Bello and Sentire, and their supernatural and magical practices to uncover the mystery behind the “disappearance” of a woman from New Mexico. Created on a fantastic thriller basis and inspired by true events and by American author H.P. Lovecraft, the three EPs take the protagonist through the stages of grief, denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. All three records together form the framework of a gloomy occult crime investigation illustrated by a special artwork and layouts that reveals some missing clues. The entire trilogy will be issued between fall 2020 and spring 2021, with first EP ‘Andiamo Nel Deserto’ coming out on Nov. 6th 2020 through Desert Records.

Tracklisting:
1. Andiamo
2. Afterman
3. Nel Deserto
4. Walk Away

L’UOMO NERO is:
Dominic Cagliostro (Domenico L’oscuro) – Vocals and guitar
Robson Guy (Quello Bello) – Bass guitar
Luke Seelau (Sentire) – Drums

L’uomo Nero, Andiamo Nel Desierto EP promo

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Light Pillars Premiere Self-Titled Debut out Sept. 4 on Sound Effect Records

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on July 31st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

If you’ve ever been in a band and had a moderately friendly conversation with someone else in a similar band, you’ve probably somewhere along the line heard the phrase “we should jam” used once or twice. Rarely does jamming result and even more rarely does it go any further than that. Melbourne two-piece Light Pillars — whose origins would seem to be based in similar proceedings — have beat the odds and will release their self-titled debut on Sept. 4 through respected Greek purveyor Sound Effect Records (sign up for their newsletter; doesn’t matter where you live). The outfit features Toby Wrecker (né Matthews) of Hotel Wrecking City Traders and Andrew Pana (né Panagopoulos) of Comacozer, and each offers a distinctive presence from within the increasingly populated sphere of Australian heavy psychedelia.

One might also think there’s nothing but self-indulgent chaos to come out of such an affair, but it actually seems like Wrecker and Pana meshed well in the studio, and had a fitting sense of where they were headed in their jams. They made the record in two days. Two days. And one was writing. How can you possibly mess with that? I can’t.

Here’s the announcement. Preorders are up today:

light pillars self titled

Light Pillars – Light Pillars – Sept. 4 2020

Australian noisy psych project LIGHT PILLARS consisting of Toby – Guitars (Hotel Wrecking City Traders) and Andrew – Drums (Comacozer) came together in June 2019 at Cellar Sessions Studios in Melbourne for an improved jam session. Both bands having played together previously and after some ideas and banter being thrown around the two decided to finally get together and see what the cosmos can produce and this release debut self-titled release resulting in 4 tracks of noisy dark heavy instrumental psych rock. Recorded in one session with Max behind the recording desk and mastered by Kent Stump (Crystal Clear Sound Studios, Dallas, Texas USA) and amazing artwork by Dora Wednesday, this is one journey taking diverse release.

Day 1: Go into a room and throw around some ideas. Day 2: Enter a studio and record. This is Light Pillars.

Album will be up on Sound Effect Records for Pre-Sale on Friday 31st July. www.soundeffect-records.gr

Street Date for release is 4th September 2020.

Light Pillars are:
Andrew Pana (Comacozer) – Drums
Toby Wrecker (Hotel Wrecking City Traders, GOUTS) – Guitars and Bass

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Warlung Premiere “Phantasmagoria” from Optical Delusions out Oct. 9

Posted in audiObelisk on July 29th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

warlung

Houston, Texas, four-piece Warlung will make their debut on Heavy Psych Sounds Oct. 9 with Optical Delusions, their third full-length. The follow-up to 2019’s Immortal Portal (review here), it finds the four-piece roaring back with a more developed approach, shades of classic metal’s theatricality blending with a modern heavy rock tonal presence and thrust of groove. It is 39 minutes long and runs eight tracks, so is right in line with current vinyl standards, but there’s a sense of storytelling that grabs the listener from opener “Phantasmagoria” onward and becomes as essential to the proceedings as the riffs and grooves. Primarily, it is tight. Tight in construction, tight in performance, tight in production. There are patient stretches here and there, as in “Sun Eater,” which closes side A ahead of the seemingly-complementary hook of “Order of the Solar Temple” at the outset of the album’s second half, but Warlung bring cuts like “The Scorpion in the Sand,” “Snake Eyes,” “Hell on Earth” (bonus for the bassline circa 2:30) and mega-catchy closer “No Man’s Land” to bear with a sense of urgency that serves the material well, the rhythm section of Chris and Ethan Tamez, on bass and drums, respectively, providing backing gallop behind the twisting riffs and dual-vocals of George Baba and Philip Bennett.

Replete with on-a-dime turns that recall the deceptive intricacy of Sabbath‘s bluesier work, there’s a traditionalism at play behind what Warlung are doing with their songs, but they are by no means bound by a vintage mindset. Some might hear shades of Ghost here and there in theWarlung Optical Delusions vocal melodies, but I get as much Rush, and either way, Warlung are hitting plenty harder, so take that for whatever it’s worth. Still, Baba and Bennett make a fitting pair vocally when they come together and there’s a sense of arriving at a place of arrangement that drives the apex of “Phantasmagoria” just as the solo in “Devil’s Game” reinforces the first-three-records Ozzy Osbourne impression being made in the midsection by following it with due pull. There are plenty of hallmark solos throughout — “Order of the Solar Temple” seems to nod at Deep Purple — but more than any particular feats of technical acumen, Warlung come across of songwriters, and much the same was true of Immortal Portal, which like their 2017 debut, Sleepwalker, will also see reissue on Heavy Psych Sounds. Currents of organ — or at very least organ-ish — melody run alongside the two guitars in “Sun Eater,” one sharper in tone, one further back, but both careening smoothly, and with the deep-toned bass beneath and the solid punctuation of the drums, Warlung are able to construct a fluidity that coincides with their dynamic changes in volume and/or meter, enhancing the experience of hearing both individual songs and Optical Delusions as a whole.

“Snake Eyes” and “Hell on Earth” — which are also the shortest cuts on each respective side — might be the barn-burners, relatively speaking, but don’t be fooled into thinking Warlung are keeping it so simple as that. It only sounds easy. “Devil’s Game” and “No Man’s Land” might finish out at a more moderate pace, but neither is staid in any way, and the same goes for earlier pieces like “The Scorpion in the Sand” and certainly “Phantasmagoria,” which is responsible for giving Optical Delusions its initial kick, hinting toward a progressive mindset but unwilling to relinquish the edge they might have to give up to fully indulge one. Again, these guys are songwriters. They’re in it for the songs, and if you’re going to get into it, the same applies. It is very much a third record in that the group sounds confident in the studio and aware of who they are as a band, but that their realization comes without any dulling of the basic impact of the material itself. If this is heavy metal, it’s heavy metal that recalls when heavy metal was fun.

You’ll find the premiere of “Phantasmagoria” below, followed by more info from the PR wire. Thanks to band, label and PR for letting me host.

Enjoy:

Warlung, “Phantasmagoria” official premiere

PHANTASMAGORIA is the second single of the Warlung brand new album Optical Delusions. The release will see the light October 9th via Heavy Psych Sounds !!

ALBUM PRESALE:
https://www.heavypsychsounds.com/shop.htm#HPS140

USA PRESALE:
https://www.forcedexposure.com/SearchResult.html?SearchType=Basic&Type=title&Key=optical%20delusions

SAYS THE BAND:
“Is it real or in my head? Phantasmagoria is about a man either haunted by a poltergeist or suffering from a serious case of optical delusions. On Optical Delusions, we found a middle ground between the classic horror theme of the first album and the rock n roll aspect of the second. We continued to experiment with song structures and changing tempos to keep the music dynamic and interesting. This album explores everything we have done before while guiding us into something new.”

WARLUNG is:
George Baba: Guitar/Vocals
Philip Bennett: Guitar/Vocals
Chris Tamez: Bass
Ethan Tamez: Drums

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Eye of Doom Premiere Title-Track From Curse of the Pharaoh EP out Sept. 25

Posted in audiObelisk on July 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Eye of Doom

Vancouver’s Eye of Doom will release their second EP, Curse of the Pharaoh, on Sept. 25. In addition to marking their first offering to be made through Majestic Mountain Records, it’s also something of a shift in approach for the three-piece, whose 2018 self-titled four-songer trafficked in decidedly more metallic and driving fare. With two eight-minute-plus cuts in the opening title-track and the closing “The Scold’s Bride” separated just by the interlude “The Waning” (2:56), the EP hits a 20-minute total listen that’s striking in its push toward atmospherics, with sonar pings backing horror samples and ambient guitar in “The Waning” before the roll that comprised much of “Curse of the Pharaoh” resumes in full nod for the outset of “The Scold’s Bride.” With vocals from bassist Alex Kadhim and guitarist Adam Mattsson atop Derek Staines‘ apparently reliable march, shades of Elephant Tree‘s melodicism show up along with an impact and underlying noise rock influence that calls Cities of Mars and other post-Monolord outfits to mind. Dudes got riffs, in case you were wondering.

Curse of the Pharaoh is strong in its presentation, beginning with a fading in swell of readily immersive tonality. They are perhaps a release or two from bringing to fruition the kind of depth and largesse they hint toward here, but that doesn’t at all stop the material from being engaging on its own level. “Curse of the Pharaoh” crashes in around 1:30 and proceeds to lumber forward in newer-Sleep form, waiting until after three minutes in before introducing the first vocal lines. With a cavernous echo, the verses likewise hint toward a burgeoning reach in what’s being tagged as their “new musical direction,” but they’re smartly mixed to not overwhelm the surrounding guitar bass or drums. Kadhim‘s bass holds true during a short break and soon the guitar solo takes hold in soaring fashion to lead through the apex of the track, the first sonar pings arriving before the shift into “The Waning” is actually complete. That one-into-the-next fluidity is also emblematic of what Eye of Doom are shooting for with their recent doomly conversion, and if the EP is anything to go by, they won’t have any trouble sticking to that — should they want to — when they set themselves to the inevitable task of their full-length debut.

When, how, where, on that, I of course have no idea, but Eye of Doom‘s stated purpose is to give those they’d make their audience an introduction to what they’re all about, and it’s a positive first impression they make, even if that ‘first’ comes with an asterisk. “Curse of the Pharaoh” is streaming on the player below, followed by more info about the release from the PR wire.

Please enjoy:

Eye of doom to release ’Curse of the Pharaoh’ on Majestic Mountain Records September 25th

Majestic Mountain Records is very pleased to announce the first release from Vancover, BC based riff masters Eye of Doom. The 3-track EP ’Curse of the Pharaoh is set for release on a 10” premium vinyl in September and this release will be followed with a full length release in early 2021!

This EP is the first introduction to the new musical direction of Eye of Doom.

The riff-molding for Curse of the Pharaoh was produced and recorded by the band in early 2020. The songs on this EP draw inspiration from the grand scenery found in the towering mountain ranges and vast forests of the band’s hometown, as well as exploring existential questions connected to topics such as mysticism, astronomy, paganism, and the occult. This EP is the result of the collaborative efforts from all members of the band and is an honest and true reflection of everything that is Eye of Doom.

’Curse of the Pharaoh’ will be on pre-order at Majestic Mountain Records, August 7th.
Vinyl is set for release in end of September and the digital release will be available August 28th.

Pre-order link:
https://majesticmountainrecords.bigcartel.com/

Eye of Doom are:
Alex Kadhim: bass and vocals
Adam Mattsson: guitar and vocals
Derek Staines: drums

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Review & Track Premiere: Black Elephant, Seven Swords

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on July 23rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Black Elephant Seven Swords

[Click play above to stream ‘Yayoi Kusama’ from Black Elephant’s Seven Swords. Album is out Aug. 21 on Small Stone Records and Kozmik Artifactz.]

The priority is set quickly on Black Elephant‘s Seven Swords, and it’s the vibe. With zero pretense about their intention, the Savona, Italy, four-piece unfurl their fourth long-player and second for Small Stone with the patient, gradual build-up of opening cut “Berta’s Flame,” clearly in no rush to get anywhere, quiet but definitely in motion, and subtly establishing both the tonal weight and the spacious atmospheres in which the rest of what follows will inhabit. There’s a theme to Seven Swords, which indeed boasts seven tracks over a wholly manageable 33 minutes — something about samurai; they could well be following the plot of the 2005 movie of the same name starring Donnie Yen for all I know — but the album as a whole is less about a narrative arc than an instrumental one. Led by the warm-toned fuzz of guitarists Alessio Caravelli and Massimiliano Giacosa, with Marcello Destefanis on bass and Simone Brunzu drumming, Black Elephant are not shy about playing to genre.

But if they’re preaching to the converted, they’re doing so because they themselves are the converted and they’re doing so with character and a sense of dynamic that, like the breadth of the mix as a whole, is established early. Hypnosis would seem to be the name of the game as “Berta’s Flame” rolls through its instrumental 6:48, but it’s not entirely ambient, and in its louder sections, it gives a glimpse of some of Seven Swords‘ more rocking moments to come, whether that’s the straightforward fuzzblast of “Yayoi Kusama” or the nothing-if-not-self-aware “Red Sun and Blues Sun” later on. Still, the wash of guitar that takes hold in “The Last March of Yokozuna,” fleshed out with effects and far-back drumming, makes clear Black Elephant‘s intention to showcase tone as a major factor in the album’s overarching personality. Fortunately, their tones, and the varied uses to which they’re put, live up to that task.

As noted, Seven Swords is Black Elephant‘s second full-length through Small Stone, and it follows 2018’s Cosmic Blues (review here) not without some sense of departure but a consistency of overarching purpose. That is, it’s mostly the theme that’s changed, but there is growth demonstrated over the course of the record as well. On the whole, Seven Swords feels more exploratory than its predecessor. It’s jammier, has a broader reach, and when it coheres around a verse/chorus riff, as on “Yayoi Kusama” — which in addition to being the third track is the first to feature vocals — the effect is striking. After “Berta’s Flame” and “The Last March of Yokozuna,” that first verse is almost a surprise the first time through the record, and that works much to Black Elephant‘s benefit, as their ability to adjust the balance of their approach continues to serve them throughout the rest of what follows. From such classic riff-rockery, they move into the centerpiece “Mihara,” which closes out the vinyl edition’s side A and boasts a reverb-soaked forward guitar lick at the outset that gracefully rolls into a steady groove of the sort in which “Berta’s Flame” traffics before it unveils its largesse.

BLACK ELEPHANT

A sense of threat of the same thing happening looms somewhat over “Mihara,” but it’s hardly a negative, and before they get there, a whispered verse and a stretch of dreamy lead guitar cap the first two minutes of the track. When the fuzz hits, it lands heavy, but the lead guitar continues to float overhead, lending atmospherics to the underlying weight, and reminding of breadth as a factor in what Black Elephant are doing throughout the songs, which flow together with deceptive ease, loud parts moving into quiet, jams solidifying, liquefying; backs and forths that sound easier than they are because they’re executed so smoothly. Drums end “Mihara” on tom roundabouts and finish cold, but the sense of side A as a united work remains prevalent, and the band’s firmness of purpose in that regard would seem to be emblematic of their experience over the decade they’ve spent together.

Side B is the shorter of the two halves by about three minutes, but there’s still plenty of work to be done, as “Red Sun and Blues Sun” indicates. It’s the shortest inclusion at just 2:41 — the longest is closer “Govinda” at 8:48 — but the title’s nod to Kyuss isn’t happenstance, but rather further evidence of the band’s self-awareness since, indeed, it’s a Kyuss-style riff that follows the guitar count-in at the beginning of the track. With tambourine adding to the rhythm and the two guitars intertwining, though, Black Elephant make their mark on the brief instrumental, branching out in the midsection before resuming the push and finishing together in time to reference “Faeries Wear Boots” at the start of “Seppuku.” That dogwhistle, bound to perk up the ears of much of the band’s listenership, is likewise put to more individualized use, as the basis for a bluesy riff accompanied by distorted vocals early but soon giving way to mid-paced fuzzy roll that builds through one of Seven Swords‘ stronger hooks.

It serves as something of a landmark for side B, pulling back from the desert idolatry of “Red Sun and Blues Sun” and preceding the immediate psychedelic impression made by the opening guitar on “Govinda.” The finale is a stretch and meant to be one, but it does not pick sides, rather summarizing the course the rest of the album has followed, almost condensing its shifts into its own run between more serene and more driven progressions. It is ultimately the jammy side that wins out over the bulk of the song — almost inevitably — though as Black Elephant hit into the final moments of “Govinda,” they embrace a last fuzzy measure on the way to a return of the open-feeling guitar that launched. That’s a pointed conclusion just the same, highlighting the consciousness at work behind Black Elephant‘s craft and the tricky nature of a record that’s so likely to put its audience in a trance without losing itself in the process. Whatever theme they’re working under, that would seem to be Black Elephant‘s greatest strength, and it makes the manner in which their work unfolds all the more engrossing.

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Atlanta Stream New Album Nugrybauti in Full

Posted in audiObelisk on July 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

atlanta

Netherlands-based heavy jammers Atlanta release their second album, Nugrybauti, this week through Lay Bare Recordings. The band features the guitar work of Pieter Holkenborg, who took part in Gary Arce‘s one-time European incarnation of Ten East — a Yawning Man jam that wasn’t, but it resulted in a cool album in 2016 — as well as drummer Bob Hogenelst of Birth of Joy and now Molassess, and bassist Sebas van Olst of Typhoon and Cool Genius, so that these dudes would get it together and know what they’re doing when jamming shouldn’t really be a surprise. Atlanta, however, have more than a pedigree of as-yet-underrated bands to offer. Having made their debut in 2018 with the 50-tapes-pressed Flamingo, they resurface through Lay Bare with a cohesive set of six-plus-one instrumental progressions, some longer, some shorter, all exploratory in an at least semi-improvised fashion. The bass or the guitar or the drums start off, the others join in, and they go until the going’s done. It should be a familiar process to those whose heads have been blown out once or twice by modern heavy psychedelia, but there’s again, there’s more here than superficially meets the ear.

Because Nugrybauti — the title of which translates from Lithuanian to mean “to go wandering in search of mushrooms,” according to the band — does more than meander. Particularly driven by Hogenelst‘s drumming, a cut like the later “Lu Li” has a jazzy underpinning to coincide with its spacious guitar work (the echoes bringing to mind, yes, an Arce connection), and as the opening salvo shifts from “Marabou Blues” to “Honolulu Strut” and “Deventer Kunstweg,” the former referencing an African stork, the middle a seeming nod to its for-a-walk drum patternATLANTA Nugrybauti if not the volcanic lava roll of tone that consumes its second half, and the latter an art walk in the city of Deventer, the Netherlands, there’s an immediate sense of Atlanta inviting the listener to interact with the material on more than just an auditory level. It’s not necessarily Google-this-while-listening, which is what I did — yeah that’s right, I had to translate “kunstweg” — but the beginning point of a conversation in which the band hopes its audience will take part, as well as a conversation among the players themselves. That second conversation is the most vivid throughout Nugrybauti, but as Atlanta go wandering, they still find ways to add flourish to what would otherwise be raw jams.

To wit, the piano and backwards guitar on “Honolulu Strut” or the surfy echo on “Marabou Blues” and the fuzzy solo burn on as “Deventer Kunstweg” propels through its apex. Side B offers a likeminded trio of delights in “Dog Whistle Concert No. 5 in E Minor,” the aforementioned “Lu Li” and comparatively mellow closer “Firefly Lullaby” before the noise-laden bonus track “Postzegel Kwijt” takes hold to salt the earth around it and ensure those subdued free jazz vibes at the end of the song before get duly roughed up before they send listeners on their way. That’s hardly the first example of willful abrasion — “Dog Whistle Concert No. 5 in E Minor” could very well take its title from the pitch of the lead guitar in its back half, and the lumber of “Honolulu Strut” gives way to a ready-set-go freakout that seems to carry over into “Deventer Kunstweg” even as that song starts out with its steady and stately drumming before the next round of noodling begins. The bass might be the anchor to it all, or maybe that’s the drums, or maybe there is no anchor and their mushroom-bound journey is out there on its own, floating and diving in various directions as it goes.

That’s a fun thought, but the truth of Atlanta‘s sophomore LP is it’s more focused than that paints it, and just because they’re improvising doesn’t necessarily mean the three-piece don’t have an idea of where they want a given piece to end up. Still, they carry across their sound with a marked dynamic, expanding on live energy without sacrificing it, crafting material that is raw at the same time it demonstrates breadth and a colorful scope that, like each subtle turn of bass or each ghost pop of a snare, is just waiting for the listener to take hold it and be carried off who knows where. In the end, did they find the mushrooms? Yeah, it seems pretty clear they did.

You can check out the entirety of Nugrybauti on the player below, courtesy of Lay Bare Recordings. More PR wire background follows.

Please enjoy:

NUGRYBAUTI (Lithuanian): to become distracted during a task, literally to get lost wandering in search of mushrooms.

Before the Covid-19 pandemic drew a lethal amount of blood out of this year’s festivals and publicly attended live music performances ATLANTA planned to release their second recording (this time in the form of an LP vinyl album) at the infamous Mañana Mañana festival in The Netherlands.

Lay Bare Recordings was steadfast on not waiting and releasing it despite our hopes to present our fully improvised music live in front of curious and eager audience.
Because; well yeah, who knows what the future holds.

However intuitive, elementary and free spirited (the source of) our music and inspired our three separate musical energies are in a live setting, we decided to go along with the expertise of this kindred spirit.

Because now more than ever we DO feel the urge of bringing our drifting soundscapes in a time where every movement is restricted.

Misprints and off-centric vinyl could not distract us from getting our fans TOP NOTCH music and vinyl. So we acted and were eagerly waiting on a new batch of 250 pcs heavy weight coloured vinyl.

We finally can reveal what was kept under wraps!

So for you to walk, sit, stumble, float and/or lay along the travels of “Nugrybauti” the release of Atlanta’s 2nd (but first label endorsed) recording is out there NOW and purchasable here: https://laybarerecordings.com/release/nugrybauti-by-atlanta-lbr030

ATLANTA is:
Bob Hogenelst (Birth Of Joy/Molasses) – Drums
Sebas van Olst (Typhoon/Cool Genius) – Bass
Pieter Holkenborg (Automatic Sam/Ten East) – Guitar

Atlanta on Thee Facebooks

Atlanta on Bandcamp

Lay Bare Recordings website

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TOOMS Premiere “One Ton Soup”; The Orb Offers Massive Signals out Friday

Posted in audiObelisk on July 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

tooms

Limerick, Ireland’s TOOMS will release their debut album, The Orb Offers Massive Signals, this Friday, July 17, through Cursed Monk Records. The acronym-monikered three-piece have already unveiled a couple tracks from the offering, as one will, but as the (I assume) last piece to a densely-weighted riffy puzzle, they offer the fitting summary “One Ton Soup,” and as you’ll probably expect given the context of the band’s name, the song’s title, the label putting it out and just about everything else up to the looks on their faces in their press photo, it’s rather heavy. They call it “thicc” and I’m not inclined to argue.

Something else “One Ton Soup” does, though is blend styles in some unexpected ways. The angularity of the opening progression, for example, and the manner in which it gives way to lurching extremity, the overarching weight seeming to rumble in the high end as well as the low, the whole thing sounding fierce and lurching with samples behind, obscured by the next round of pummeling that soon begins. The song runs seven minutes total, so it’s not a minor sampling by any means of the 10 track offering — though I’ll admit to no small amount of curiosity to hear tooms the orb offers massive signals“Megalobong,” especially given their stated affinity for earlier Mastodon — and as “One Ton Soup” breaks at its halfway point to crashes and snare march (and samples), the procession feels all the more extreme-sludge for its sense of militarism; the song almost sounds like it’s beating itself with itself. Like if you were to self-flagellate by slapping your own face, but with the riff.

Is it massive? Well it’s frickin’ called “One Ton Soup,” so yes thank you very much it is. A quiet line of Fender Rhodes comes in to finish, kind of out of nowhere, but the distorted underpinning remains, and the landscape over which TOOMS just marched for the last three and a half minutes of the track is duly flattened. I don’t know what happens when “Krokodil Den” takes hold as the next track on The Orb Offers Massive Signals, but I know listening to “One Ton Soup” makes me curious to find out, so I suppose that’s one reason to roll out the ol’ ‘Mission Accomplished’ banner, if you needed one.

Preorders are up now through Cursed Monk‘s Bandcamp, from which the following player also comes, bringing the premiere of “One Ton Soup.”

Before I turn you over to the music, I’d like to extend thanks to the band for the thought and detail and personality they put into the quote about it. Sometimes you ask a band for a quote about a song and they give you a half-sentence that equates to “duh we wrote it dude.” Fair enough, but it’s clear TOOMS took the time to really give some background — right down to the lyrics and the gear they used — and it is appreciated.

Enjoy the track:

TOOMS on “One Ton Soup”:

With “One Ton Soup” we basically tried to write the nastiest, heaviest choon possible at that time.

The intro was 100% inspired by High On Fire’s “Hung Drawn and Quartered.” The rest of the song? Not sure exactly where it came from, just carved itself out of the stratosphere by jamming, and we managed to stumble upon these riffs.

There is a chord in the slowed down part that we call the Lamb of God chord, and the main part of the song, in hindsight, was probably inspired by “Mother Puncher”-era Mastodon. There is also that black metal tremolo part before the thicc crushing S L O W outro, so we were certainly drawing from many different influences.

We actually recorded the drums for this way before we did guitars, and did this strange slow-down-speed-up thing with the drums during the bridge between main riff sections with vocals. It was super hard to recreate on guitar, and just didn’t seem right, so we chopped the drums a little for that part to make it feel less stumbling, and because of that it gives it a little feel of industrial/electronic music, which was totally a happy accident.

The guitars are layered much on the whole album with many many pedals, from wah-pedals cocked all the way down and drowned in distortion, to filter pedals mangled with custom built fuzz pedals,(“The Sodomizer” being a aptly named one) But on this particular song, the guitar tone is mostly just coming from overdriven amp distortion. Used a modded Bugera head that’s basically a Fender Bassman, and a Jch50 on the overdrive channel. Layered em both, used a 2×12 cab with celestions in it, and boom, TONE.

Our sound engineer and recording genius Chris also came up with some great ideas, one of which being to vari-speed the guitars; which is basically, play the riff twice as fast, record that, then slow it back to its written speed and pitch correct it. It gives a dragging, lumbering feel (have probably got that way wrong, but that is the jist). Chris also played all the nasty bubbling sounds that you can hear beneath the riffs during the bridge. He also followed the guitar’s melody line during the outro and played the Fender Rhodes that fades in and takes the song to a whole new level, which was a collective idea that stemmed from many hours together in little rooms making guitars sound horrible.

The sample just before the outro kicks into full gear is taken from Black Dynamite, just to remind us all that metal can be heavy as fuck, but doesn’t need to be super serious all the time (Looking at you death metal).

Vocal and lyrical wise, it’s a song basically about soup that drinks you and follows the description of you (the listener) becoming used as an ingredient in the Devil’s broth, and describes in detail all the gross ways in which you are dismantled and turned into a human crouton.

It had originally just been the first couple of lines repeated over and over. But on the day of tracking the vocals, it didn’t seem right or do the music justice, so the vocals were written as they were being tracked. As far as the vocal delivery is concerned, it was very much “vocals as an instrument” kind of approach. We thought about putting more vocals on the outro, but felt like it just didn’t need any there, it felt complete and once the Rhodes melody was added, we knew it was done.

Lyrics:
One. One tone. One. Tone soup burns you.
Burns. Boils teeth. Melts. Gums and scalds lips.
You. You chose. The. Special of the day.
Death. Death broth. Death. Death broth drinks you.
Wake. Wake up. Wake. Wake up in wok.
Now. Now your. Now. Now you’re sautéed.
Shaved. And skinned. Hung. You been bleed dry.
Blow. It’s hot. Blow. Or tongue get sore.
Death. Death broth. Death. Death broth bubbles.
One. One tone. One. Tone soup drank you.
Your. Your blood. Your. Blood and guts gone.
Hot. Hot oils. Skin. Crispy garnish.
Taste. Taste good. Hu. Hu-man hot pot.
Devil. Devil chef. Serve. You soup on plate.
Death. Death broth. Death. Death rules world

TOOMS are:
Drums, gong – Kieran ‘Slippy Fingers’ AKA ‘Chodo Baggins’ AKA ‘The Wobbler’ Grace
Bass – Anto ‘The Wizard’ AKA ‘Farmer Arms’ AKA ‘Old Man’ AKA ‘Coldplay’ Donnellan
Guitar, vocals – Alex ‘The Riffsmiff AKA Big Slim(e) AKA The Vanilla Gorilla’ AKA ‘Half-Bar’ Hölzinger

TOOMS on Thee Facebooks

TOOMS on Bandcamp

Cursed Monk Records website

Cursed Monk Records on Bandcamp

Cursed Monk Records on Thee Facebooks

Cursed Monk Records on Instagram

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