Farflung, 5: Boiled by the 27th Sun (Plus Full Album Stream)

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on May 24th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

farflung-5

[Farflung release their new album, 5, via Heavy Psych Sounds this weekend at Freak Valley 2016. Click play above to stream it in full.]

They’ve hardly been inactive in the interim, but 5 marks the first studio LP from Los Angeles space rockers Farflung in eight years. Released by Heavy Psych Sounds, it follows 2008’s A Wound in Eternity (on MeteorCity) as well as splits with White Hills, Black Rainbows and Fatso Jetson (review here), among others, and finds the long-running outfit past the 20-year mark since their debut, 25,000 Feet Per Second, came out in 1995. Through the bulk of that two decades, Farflung have coursed through the cosmos thoroughly underappreciated for their efforts — similar to split-mates White Hills, who started later, they seem to have found more of a foothold in Europe than in the US.

But 5 brings renewed vitality in its nine miniaturized interstellar voyages/43 minutes, all songs but the opening three under five minutes long but with a significant breadth all the same, dripping in effects and spaced far enough out that the scale of “far out” only seems to begin to cover it. Some vibe can only be measured in parsecs, and with the band comprised of Tommy Grenas, Michael Esther, Paul Hischier, Abby Travis and Chris Nakata with guest appearances from Hawkwind‘s Nik Turner, David Catching and Gene Troutmann (both affiliated with Queens of the Stone Age and Eagles of Death Metal), Farflung‘s vibe pushes outward from the moment of its inception until it closes with the almost tribal krautrock thrust of “The Retreat,” as progressive as it is lysergic.

Naturally, they are right at home in this expanding sphere. “Hive” opens 5 — which by the way is upwards of Farflung‘s eighth album — and is the longest cut on it at 6:53 (immediate points), acting as intro for itself and the record as a whole with its emergent swirl in the first minute that soon launches into kosmiche boogie instrumental save for some buried vocalizations. The push is everything. They’re not quite aping Hawkwind at the outset, but the thrust of the first half is clearly-enough working to break through the atmosphere, which “Hive” seems to do and float for a while in its second half before resuming its outward crunch. Effects start “Proterozoic” as well, but a more forward structure takes hold, with lyrics delivered in echoing deadpan over double snare taps for a garage rock feel that takes off its in chorus.

farflung

That hook turns out to be one of the strongest on 5 and is followed by a long stretch of hypnotic, resonantly psychedelic drone and effects near the finish, which sets up the more earthbound riff opening “044MPZ,” with a kind of New Wave synth line underscoring its verse and a sense of space in the chorus behind interweaving echoes. Synth and Echoplex add fluidity to a languid solo, and though it seems like Farflung have hit the point of no return from whence the only thing to do is continue to jam, they turn back to the chorus before shifting into less-plugged acid fervor. “044MPZ” is the crucial third in the aforementioned longer-tracks opening trio, and what follows from there on “27th Sun” and side B read like reports checking in from the various worlds Farflung have visited along their way to wherever it is they might end up by the album’s end.

“Lupine,” the centerpiece, calls back to “044MPZ” in its tone, but with a change in vocals (is that Turner?) that marks it out immediately ahead of the shorter “Being Boiled,” which has a more brooding take. Waves of guitar and repetitive robotic chants position “We Are” as something of a landmark, but at that point it’s really more about the wash in its entirety than any single element — all these layers drawing together to create something immersive and entrancing. Slower and more centered around low end, “Dismal Jimmy” is nonetheless among the trippier offerings on 5, and almost enough to make one wish Farflung hit the brakes more often, but while the penultimate inclusion, it also stands as reinforcement of the fact that as far as the band has to that point journeyed, they’ve still got the warp drive geared toward who the hell knows.

And if you’re looking for that answer in “The Retreat,” good luck. Resolution comes in cinematic percussive drama backed by the ever-present swirl, and is less about making the album preceding more accessible than showing that Farflung could probably keep it as well as all of the ideas presented before it going into perpetuity. In that way, 5 feels somewhat pared down, like these tracks were carved from longer jams during the songwriting and shaped into what they are with effects and layers of keys and synth and so on, but that shouldn’t be taken as an indication that there’s anything happening here other than exploration, since that very much remains at the heart of what Farflung have accomplished on this welcome return.

Farflung on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Psych Sounds

Tags: , , , , ,

King Buffalo Stream Orion Title-Track; Preorders up Now

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on May 23rd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

king buffalo

Rochester heavy psych-blues trio King Buffalo will issue their debut long-player, Orion, on Aug. 5, 2016. It’s an album rife with organic, flowing grooves, nighttime expanses and memorable progressions… which is something I expect at least some of you reading this already know, since the three-piece — who made their debut with 2013’s Demo (review here) and also released a split with the now-defunct Lé Betre (review here) on STB last year — snuck out a pre-release download-only edition of Orion a couple months ago in order to help finance the pressing of the LP and CD versions, which come with different artwork courtesy of bassist Dan Reynolds and are available now to preorder ahead of the aforementioned release date.

I’ll tell you at the outset that I’ve been waiting for King Buffalo‘s debut, at times impatiently. As in, emailing the band to ask if it’s done yet. I knew before I heard it that I wanted them at the first-ever The Obelisk All-Dayer on Aug. 20 at Saint Vitus Bar in Brooklyn (info here) and was only gladder to have asked them when I actually heard Orion itself. There’s a laid-back sensibility to even its heaviest moments, and some (myself included when I actually get to reviewing it) will compare parts of it to their Nashville-based aesthetic compatriots in All Them Witches, but ultimately King Buffalo are on a denser-toned trip with Orion‘s tracks, guitarist/vocalist Sean McVay (who also engineered and mixed) establishes his own personality and approach, and they come out of their first album having completely justified the anticipation that came before it.

If you haven’t, you can hear a sort-of-premiere for Orion‘s titular cut below, followed by some comment from drummer/backing vocalist Scott Donaldson about the song, the rather extensive list of tour dates the band has booked for the summer, and of course, the preorder link.

Hope you enjoy:

Scott Donaldson on “Orion”:

“Orion (title-track) came together rather easily. Sean started with the opening slow melodic riff, and it organically fell into place. The tempo change and tom build up naturally happened, and we all locked into the crescendo through the end. This was the very first song we recorded for the album. It was so exciting to listen back and hear those sounds for the first time. We knew immediately we wanted it to be the opening track.”

Available for the first time. King Buffalo’s long-awaited debut full length “Orion” on wax! Preorder your copy of what many are calling a “Contender for album of the year!”

The classic Black 12″ Vinyl comes in a Single pocket jacket, with a Polybag and download code. The 1st pressings are limited to 500 and hand numbered.

Albums will be shipped as soon as we receive them, which should be early August of 2016. Download Code will be sent immediately after purchase via email.

Written and recorded by King Buffalo in Rochester, NY at the Main Street Armory in 2015.

Produced and Engineered by Sean McVay.
Mastered for vinyl by Bernard Matthews at BMAP INC.
Mastered for digital by Matt Ramerman.
Artwork by Dan Reynolds.

King Buffalo live:
5/26 Toronto, ON – Bovine Sex Club
6/4 Rochester, NY – Bug Jar (Tour Send Off) w/ Slow Season, Geezer and Bygone Few
JUN 15 WED Carabar Columbus, OH w/ Eye
JUN 16 THU FooBar Nashville, TN w/ Holy Mountain Top Removers
JUN 17 FRI Murphys Memphis, TN
JUN 18 SAT Freak Tulsa 2016 Tulsa, OK
JUN 19 SUN The Mix San Antonio, TX w/ Slow Season
JUN 20 MON The Grand Austin, TX
JUN 21 TUE The Blind Mule Mobile, AL w/ Black Titan
JUN 22 WED TBD Athens, GA
JUN 23 THU Urban Artifact Cincinnati, OH
JUN 24 FRI Brillobox Pittsburgh, PA w/ Year Of The Cobra
JUN 25 SAT Guidos Speakeasy Frederick, MD w/ IRATA Akris Floodlore
JUL 15 FRI The Dev Utica, NY
JUL 16 SAT The Barn Volney, NY
JUL 22 FRI The Grog Shop Cleveland, OH w/ All Them Witches
JUL 23 SAT Tralf Music Hall Buffalo, NY w/ All Them Witches
JUL 26 TUE Club Cafe Pittsburgh, PA w/ All Them Witches
AUG 4 THU Monkey Bar Burlington, VT
AUG 5 FRI The Low Beat Albany, NY
AUG 6 SAT Otro Cinco Syracuse, NY
AUG 10 WED The Happy Dog Cleveland, OH
AUG 11 THU FooBar Nashville, TN
AUG 12 FRI Caledonia Lounge Athens, GA
AUG 13 SAT The Garage Winston-Salem, NC
AUG 16 TUE Slims Raleigh, NC
AUG 17 WED Strange Matter Richmond, VA
AUG 20 SAT The Obelisk All-Dayer Brooklyn, NY w/ Mars Red Sky, Funeral Horse

Orion LP preorder

Orion CD preorder

King Buffalo BigCartel store

King Buffalo website

King Buffalo on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

Hey Zeus Premiere New Single “Caveman”

Posted in audiObelisk on May 20th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

hey zeus

Boston heavy rockers Hey Zeus will reportedly feature the track “Caveman” on an upcoming Underdogma Records split seven-incher with The Humanoids sometime this summer. The four-piece of vocalist Bice Nathan, guitarist Pete Knipfing (ex-Lamont), bassist Ken Cmar (head of Wonderdrug Records) and drummer Todd Bowman (ex-Lamont) have trickled out digital singles over the last couple years, as well as a split 7″ with fellow Beantowners White Dynomite (review here), and it would seem the intent is to keep momentum going and build up a catalog of material en route to the eventual debut album. No word on the timing for that, but that’s he impression I get, anyway.

Their style is rife with the straightforward, classic delivery and harder edge that has been brought to fruition in Boston acts like Roadsaw and Cortez, but a quick listen hey zeus saves artto “Caveman” — and “Caveman” is a quick listen — and it’s readily apparent they have their own personality as well, defined through a blend of swaggering rhythms, party-ready vibe and an underlying punkishness in Nathan‘s vocals during its verses. The hook is essential and delivered with purpose, and though “Caveman” is done in under four minutes, it’s the kind of soon you loop back to the start and give another runthrough to better digest, only to find the chorus ringing in your head later, along with subtle flourishes like the layering in Knipfing‘s short solo or the double-kick and cowbell that Bowman works into the second half.

Admittedly, it’s been a while since I last caught them live, but their vibe at the time was much the same — ready to knock back a few beers and raise some hell but with more than chops enough underlying to give their delivery some force. They have a couple shows booked for this summer, presumably the single will show up at some point during the warm months as well, and more to come in terms of singles and a video to follow, so keep an eye out. In the meantime, you can find the stream of “Caveman” below.

Please enjoy:

Hey Zeus live:
07.15 Hey Zeus w/ Black Helicopter & Wolfsmyth @ Obrien’s, Allston
07.22 Hey Zeus w/ Scissorfight, Murcielago and The Road Trash Band @ Higher Ground, Burlington, VT

Hey Zeus on Thee Facebooks

Hey Zeus on Bandcamp

Tags: , , , , , ,

Roadburn 2016 Audio Streams: Buried at Sea, Full of Hell, Hexvessel, Beastmaker, Misþyrming, Epitaph, Hangman’s Chair & Hair of the Dog

Posted in audiObelisk on May 20th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Buried at Sea at Roadburn 2016 (Photo by JJ Koczan)

As always with these Roadburn streams, some of this stuff I got to see and some of it I didn’t. I’ve said many times and I stand by it: Roadburn means hard choices. Do I watch an American act make a triumphant European debut or go see a local Dutch band I’ll probably never have the chance to watch again. Once-or-twice-in-a-lifetime black metal or another psychedelic jam session? These are hard choices I’m fortunate to be making, and you certainly won’t find me complain about making them, but they’re hard choices all the same.

Roadburn 2016 had a few can’t-miss acts for me though, and two of them are represented here in this latest batch of audio streams in Buried at Sea and Hexvessel. The reasoning behind the former should be obvious to anyone who’s experienced their tonal (and total) doom onslaught either live or on record, and as for Hexvessel, I was curious to find out how they’d bring their new album to life while also doing justice to their last two, executed in a different style. As you can hear in the below, it wasn’t an issue.

I didn’t get to watch them, but I also heard that Beastmaker, Full of Hell and Iceland’s Misþyrming killed, and this round also features Epitaph, Hair of the Dog and Hangman’s Chair, all recorded and mixed by Marcel van de Vondervoort and his team from Torture Garden Studio.

Enjoy:

Beastmaker – Live at Roadburn 2016

Buried at Sea – Live at Roadburn 2016

Epitaph – Live at Roadburn 2016

Full of Hell – Live at Roadburn 2016

Hair of The Dog – Live at Roadburn 2016

Hangman’s Chair – Live at Roadburn 2016

Hexvessel – Live at Roadburn 2016

Misþyrming – Live at Roadburn 2016 (Söngvar elds og óreiðu in its entirety)

Special thanks as always to Walter for letting me host the streams. To hear the first batch of Roadburn 2016 audio streams, click here, and for all of this site’s coverage of Roadburn 2016, click here.

Roadburn’s website

Marcel Van De Vondervoort on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Kaleidobolt, The Zenith Cracks: The Spoils (Plus Track Premiere)

Posted in audiObelisk on May 17th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

kaleidobolt-the-zenith-cracks

Helsinki trio Kaleidobolt will release their second album, The Zenith Cracks, on July 1 via Pink Tank Records, and as any follow-up worthy of the name should, it builds off its predecessor in noteworthy and exciting ways. That prior debut was last year’s self-titled (review here), which showcased a band barely a year old making strides suited to acts of much longer tenure. With The Zenith Cracks — topped off by Adam Burke cover art — guitarist/vocalist Sampo Kääriäinen, bassist/vocalist Marco Menestrina and drummer Valtteri Lindholm highlight creative breadth and nuance across eight tracks of boogie-laced heavy psychedelia, executing winding riffs with crispness worthy of The Atomic Bitchwax on the intro “Off the Cuff,” reveling in fuzz nod on “Inbred” and freaking out across a jam-heavy closing duo of “City of the Sun” and “Spoil.”

This is accomplished all while brandishing instrumental chemistry and toss-off vocals that seem to leave a trail of hooks behind them as they race or lumber past, songs like “Murderous Ways,” “The Crux” and “City of the Sun” landmarking memorable impressions on both of The Zenith Cracks‘ gatefold-earning sides while “Steal My Thunder” proffers madman Sabbathian blues with frantic piano deep in the mix and the prior “Helle” opens side B with, if you’ll pardon, a bit of finger to coincide.

Lindholm takes a drum solo on “City of the Sun,” and Kääriäinen‘s guitar is a guiding presence throughout, steering through the shuffle of “Murderous Ways” and the twists of “The Crux,” but Menestrina brings the true standout performance across the album’s span, his choice basslines complementing and enhancing the guitar without losing sight of their place as the rhythmic foundation of the band. To have Kääriäinen depart in “The Crux” for a winding lead and find Menestrina not just keeping pace, but building off what his bandmate is doing is a thrill often lost on the classic heavy rock set, and the power of the trio is all the more prevalent for it.

It’s something immediately apparent as “Off the Cuff” — it may well have been — takes quick flight into a dizzying array, and remains true as “Murderous Ways” spaces out in its midsection, as organ takes hold late in “The Crux,” and as “Inbred” departs its initial push and subsequent jazzy dreaminess to a more fully-fuzzed groove. I won’t take away from what Lindholm brings to the drums — his crash is the anchor as “Inbred” winds down — or what Kääriäinen is doing on guitar throughout, but Menestrina basically puts on a how-to-be-a-kickass-heavy-rock-bassist clinic without sounding like he’s putting on a clinic, and the result is one of the most resonant impressions Kaleidobolt offer with the whole of The Zenith Cracks.

kaleidobolt

A key to the debut was the flow Kaleidobolt established between the tracks, and it’s to the benefit of The Zenith Cracks that that penchant hasn’t been lost. “Helle” eases into a more broad-reaching second half of the album, its still-complex blend of acoustic and electric strum opening to the crazed forward motion of “Steal My Thunder.” KääriäinenMenestrina and Lindholm trade back and forth in tension and release before shifting in the midsection to a stretch of minimal guitar leading to a surf-type line from which they build back up in layers of vocals around the lines, “Spiraling, spiraling, spiraling further/We are spiraling further from home,” in intertwined late-’60s psychedelic chants.

The cowbell arrives — finally! — after the slower-rolling intro of “City of the Sun,” and does so with Mountain-esque abandon, the band shifting into high-gear for a Kääriäinen lead only to turn back to the aforementioned drum solo in the second half, from which they miraculously return to the slower tempo fuzz of the song’s open. It’s an exhausting stretch, but Kaleidobolt back it with the 10-minute finale, “Spoil,” which bides its time through a multi-stage intro thrust and spaced-out verses in order to setup the freakout to come as they take off instrumentally into the sunset and pull apart in an extended closing raucous enough to answer for what came before it.

Between the sonic character the band portrays here and the command they’ve taken of their sound, Kaleidobolt‘s The Zenith Cracks provides a play-it-louder response to the potential Kaleidobolt exhibited their first time out. Perhaps most telling is that even as the band’s ambition has grown in terms of aesthetic, they’ve drawn closer together as players as well, and so their material is all the more assured as it works quickly to take these forward steps. One wouldn’t begrudge Kaleidobolt taking their time after The Zenith Cracks, but we’d be lucky to get another installment from them in 2017.

Kaleidobolt on Thee Facebooks

Kaleidobolt on Bandcamp

Kaleidobolt at Pink Tank Records

Tags: , , , , ,

Atala Stream Shaman’s Path of the Serpent in Full

Posted in audiObelisk on May 16th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

atala (Photo by Matt Hall)

California’s Atala release their second album, Shaman’s Path of the Serpent, this Friday, May 20. If the cover art looks familiar, it might be because the Billy Anderson-produced record has already been reviewed in this space, but the story basically goes that I got asked if I wanted to do the full-album stream as well, and the truth is there’s more to say about the progressive and atmospheric leap the three-piece of guitarist/vocalist Kyle Stratton (also a tattoo artist), bassist John Chavarria and drummer Jeff Tedtaotao make with these four songs, so yeah, I’m down.

As previously noted, it’s been just about a year since Atala made their self-titled debut (review here), and Shaman’s Path of the Serpent works not only as a forward step, but on a completely different scale, borrowing echoing atmospheric largesse from the likes of Deftones and driving it out to the desert with aggression in mind. Even upbeat stretches atala shamans path of the serpentlike the shuffle of second cut “Levity” retain an overarching air of threat, and from the beginning of 10-minute opener and longest cut (immediate points) “Gravity,” its beginning guitar reminiscent of Tool, there’s a rolling doom lumber that feels tonally kin to Pallbearer but made much more Atala‘s own through Stratton‘s vocals and the interplay of varied atmospheres as the blown-out thrust of “King Solomon” and churning crush of “Shapeshifter” continue to build on what the band accomplishes with the first two tracks until all that’s left is noise.

Like I said, Shaman’s Path of the Serpent has already been reviewed, so I don’t want to retread, but consider this post an emphasis on how pivotal and how blazingly quick their growth has been. The first record operated in a straightforward heavy rock style, more barroom than darkened parking lot, and while tracks were constructed on a solid foundation of songwriting, there was little of the kind of scope that even “Gravity” brings at the open, let alone anything that follows. Its airier patience is something that comes with little foreshadow, and as “Shapeshifter” pulls itself apart at the end, there is nothing about that moment that isn’t Atala‘s own, and it puts one final exclamation point on how far the band has come with what’s still just their sophomore full-length.

Atala are on tour next month, headed east to play Maryland Doom Fest 2016 among other live dates. I was dying to know more about what was driving the progression on Shaman’s Path of the Serpent, so reached out to Stratton to get the scoop. You’ll find his comments, the tour dates and the album preorder link under the player below, on which you can stream the album in its entirety.

Please enjoy:

Kyle Stratton on working with Billy Anderson:

On this album, Shaman’s Path of the Serpent, we wanted to do something heavy in a spiritual sense. Lyrically, I was writing about transcending life through death to a spiritual rebirth. With the subject matter I wanted to express, we knew the vocals would be soft in order to evoke a trance-like state, so we wanted the music to come across as very dark and heavy to give the feeling of crossing over to the other side of existence. We choose Billy Anderson because he is an expert at capturing very heavy tones. After speaking with him through emails and getting his feedback on the demos, we knew he was the dude.

The recording process was amazing. Billy really came in with a good idea of what he wanted to do and we came in prepared. It was a mold. We recorded the whole album in four very long days. We worked 16 to 18 hour days, went to sleep then woke up and did it again. Billy even had ideas for vocal melodies and would play them on guitar so I could sing to them. He also laid some extra guitar tracks, and he did the monk chants on the end of the album. I feel he really brought a lot to the plate and we are very grateful to have such a great album because of it. Hopefully he will be on board for the next one.

Atala on tour:
06.18 Scottsdale AZ The Rogue Bar
06.19 Lubbock TX Depot Obar
06.21 St. Louis MO Fubar
06.22 Lakewood OH The Foundry
06.24 Frederick MD Maryland Doom Fest
06.27 Spartanburg SC Ground Zero
06.28 Birmingham AL The Nick
06.29 Fayetteville AR Nomad’s
06.30 Dallas TX Reno’s Chop Shop
07.01 El Paso TX Mesa Music Hall
07.02 Bisbee AZ The Quarry
07.03 Riverside CA PBW

Shaman’s Path of the Serpent preorder

Atala on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

Limestone Whale Premiere “Tale of the Snow Child” from Self-Titled Debut

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on May 12th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

limestone whale (Photo by Christian Illing)

Bavarian four-piece Limestone Whale will release their self-titled debut album on May 27 via Stone Free Records. They recorded the seven-track offering at Big Snuff Studio in Berlin with Richard Behrens, also of Heat, formerly of Samsara Blues Experiment and who also does live sound for Kadavar. That connection isn’t to be entirely forgotten when it comes to the sound of Limestone Whale‘s 39-minute LP, but neither is it the sum-total of their breadth, because while songs like “Paralyzed in Paradise” (video posted here) and hook-laden opener “Ambrosia” draw from a modified ’70s pastiche, vocalist Clement Hoffer, guitarist Flo Ryan Kiss, bassist René Preiß and drummer Maximilian Brev also dig into a grunge-style lumber on German-language centerpiece cut “Swarms” and the early-PearlJam-gone-bluesier guitar of “A Book I Have to Close,” which follows, one of several effective moments on the record of genuine melancholia alongside the earlier, doomier “Tale of the Snow Child” and closer “An Allegation,” which calls back to “Swarms” in its darker, chugging finish.

Establishing this decades-spanning sonic meld is the stated intent of Limestone Whale‘s debut, and the outcome is that the songs, whichever period they’re drawing from, are executed with an overarching focus on natural feel. It’s less about sounding like it’s 1971 than it is about presenting the material in organic a manner as possible. Again, I wouldn’t limestone whale limestone whalesay the band are completely divorced from retro European heavy — from the dry treatment on Hoffer‘s vocals to the rhythmic swing permeating the slower “W,” those elements are definitely there — but like their Pentagrammy Danish counterparts in Demon Head last yearLimestone Whale bring a near-immediate sense of persona to the songs on their first album, which is all the more impressive for that clarity of effort since it still sounds live-recorded and laid back. Some of that is Behrens, of course, but if the material wasn’t strong in the first place, the album would feel flat and lifeless, and instead it carries across a palpable energy without sounding sloppy or losing its sense of command as it sets up a dynamic of fluid rhythmic and volume changes that carries the listener across Limestone Whale‘s span.

Aside from the fact that the early ’90s are fair game again for influence, which is understandable since 1991 was 25 years ago, the message Limestone Whale send with these songs is that something truly classic is timeless. This decade has seen a boom in bands — largely in Europe, but in the US as well — turning their heads backward to find their inspiration, but with newer, next-generation acts like Limestone Whale, they don’t even have to go that far, since the heavy rock of the last half-century has become one giant mash, fed into itself and sustained by the continuing drive of those playing it to refine the form. Limestone Whale step into that process confidently on their self-titled, and as they execute broad-minded ambitions in a way that results in cohesive songcraft, one can only look forward to hearing how they’ll develop over their tenure and what they might ultimately contribute to that oeuvre. For now, they’ve shown remarkable potential in their debut full-length and accomplished precisely what it seems they set out to do. That’s more than enough to make the effort worthy of praise.

It’s my pleasure today to host “Tale of the Snow Child” as a track premiere. You’ll find it below, followed by some comment from Kiss about the song and the album as a whole.

Please enjoy:

Flo Ryan Kiss on “Tale of the Snow Child”:

Some parts of our music refer to late ’60s Heavy Psych Blues and early 70s Hard Rock because it’s a very important musical style for us, but we decided not only to revive the spirit of that era by playing riffs that have been played partly over and over again. Instead of that we want to add new flavours like 90s alternative rock or grunge elements. It’s like building bridges between different rock decades with the bridges consisting of a modern but very natural and analog sound.

Limestone Whale on Thee Facebooks

Limestone Whale on Bandcamp

Limestone Whale at Stone Free Records

Limestone Whale at Wormhole Mailorder

Tags: , , , , ,

Roadburn 2016 Audio Streams: The Skull, Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, Bang, Atomikylä, Abyssion, Tau Cross, Sinistro, Oranssi Pazuzu, Repulsion and Dark Buddha Rising

Posted in audiObelisk on May 11th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Brothers of the Sonic Cloth at Roadburn 2016 (Photo by JJ Koczan)

Some good shit here. I was bummed to miss Atomikylä and Oranssi Pazuzu both at Roadburn 2016, but having caught the likes of Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, The Skull, Bang, Tau Cross and Repulsion, it’s not like you’re going to find me complaining. Even less so now, since though we’re not yet a month out from when the festival actually took place in its home of Tilburg, the Netherlands, the first round of the traditional audio streams have arrived. All of the above mentioned are included, as well as Sinistro, Dark Buddha Rising and Abyssion, making it a pretty succinct summary of the breadth of the fest as a whole, from warm-toned classic rock to raging grind and black metal to the dreariest depths of doom. Yup, that about covers it.

As always, these streams were captured by Marcel van de Vondervoort — who also played this year with Astrosoniq; can’t wait till their set gets posted — and I’m thrilled to host them both for the memories they bring back and for the chance to hear stuff I didn’t get to see. I don’t mind telling you and I don’t think I’m giving away any state secrets when I say it was a hard transition back to real life this year, so to have a bit of escapism in the form of these sets is most welcome.

I hope you also enjoy digging in:

Abyssion – Live at Roadburn 2016

Atomikyla – Live at Roadburn 2016

Bang – Live at Roadburn 2016

Brothers of the Sonic Cloth – Live at Roadburn 2016

Dark Buddha Rising – Live at Roadburn 2016

Oranssi Pazuzu – Live at Roadburn 2016

Repulsion – Live at Roadburn 2016

Tau Cross – Live at Roadburn 2016

Sinistro – Live at Roadburn 2016

The Skull – Live at Roadburn 2016 (Thursday, April 14)

The Skull – Live at Roadburn 2016 (Friday, April 15 – playing Trouble’s Psalm 9 in its entirety)

Special thanks as always to Walter for letting me host the streams. For all of this site’s coverage of Roadburn 2016, click here.

Roadburn’s website

Marcel Van De Vondervoort on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,