Ufomammut, 8: Infinity Turns Sideways (Plus Full Album Stream)

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on August 30th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

ufomammut 8

[Click play above to stream Ufomammut’s new album, 8, in full. Album is out Sept. 22 on Neurot and Supernatural Cat.]

Of the various words and phrases that might come to mind when considering Italian cosmic doom masters Ufomammut, ‘concise’ is probably pretty low on the list. Yet that’s exactly one of the most striking impressions made by 8, their aptly-titled eighth long-player and third for Neurot Recordings behind 2015’s Ecate (review here) and the preceding 2012 two-parter, Oro: Opus Primum (review here) and Oro: Opus Alter (review here). At 47:16, it’s about as long as was Ecate, but it uses its time for eight songs instead of that record’s six, and would seem to be continuing a progression toward efficiency of approach that record set forth, drawing back from the expanses of Oro or 2010’s single-song Eve (review here) in favor of a more immediate sonic impact. Of course, it’s still Ufomammut we’re talking about. Even when they were in their nascent stages across early releases like 2000’s Godlike Snake, 2004’s Snailking (discussed here) or 2005’s Lucifer Songs before 2008’s Idolum really marked the point of their arrival to wider consciousness as stylistic innovators (which they already had been for years at that point, but still), they went big in terms of sound, and 8 offers plenty of expanse, whether it’s in the nine-minute reaches of “Zodiac” or the radical tempo shifts of “Prismaze.”

But it becomes a question of context. 8 is Ufomammut‘s first album in more than a decade on which no song passes the mark of being 10 minutes long — that’s counting Eve as one track — and it’s not just about runtime. While opener “Babel” sets in motion at a steady roll, not necessarily in a rush but not gruelingly slow either, tripping out in its second half as bassist/keyboardist/vocalist Urlo, guitarist/keyboardist Poia and drummer Vita, set up an apex of crush to follow, subsequent cuts “Warsheep” and “Zodiac” build a tension that extends well past the midpoint of the latter and even then only recedes momentarily before reigniting. And as 8 continues to move forward, it becomes increasingly clear that the character of the album is as much about head-down intensity as it is about the sense of galactic expansion that seems to have always been so essential to Ufomammut‘s output.

As it invariably would, 8 brings new context to the turn of approach that really started with Ecate coming off of Oro, the 2015 outing serving as the point at which Ufomammut embarked on the redirection that continues here in songs like the thrusting four-minute “Fatum” or the aforementioned “Prismaze” that follows — both with their space-bound aspects, both with an overarching vibe of getting down to business as quickly as possible. But whether taken as part of the ongoing narrative of the three-piece’s progression or on its own merits, the album unquestionably succeeds in what it seems to set out to do, which is to blend expanse of sound with lung-collapsing tonal and rhythmic crush. There is much about it that will be familiar to longtime followers of the band, from the way its tracks jump right from one to the next — often in time or with noted and purposefully jarring tempo shifts, like different movements of one whole work — to the watery effects on Urlo‘s vocals, but as identifiable as these elements are, Ufomammut continue to develop their craft as well, and while some individual pieces throughout may be shorter, there’s no question of the purpose in how they’re tied together.

ufomammut

It’s audible in the crash that bridges “Prismaze” and “Core” and in the way the penultimate “Wombdemonium” — the shortest cut on 8 at just three minutes long — feeds into the Isis-style drum patterning of closer “Psyrcle.” Those connections definitely become more prevalent across side B, which before hitting the “Psyrcle” (7:44) moves through the already-noted shorter cuts, as opposed to “Babel” (8:23) “Warsheep” (5:06) and “Zodiac” (9:27) on side A, but even as “Zodiac” slams into its swirling finish before the chugging opening riff of “Fatum” takes hold — another direct transition for those listening digitally or on CD, in indeed I’m even right about where the vinyl divides — the band makes it plain that how one song converses with its surroundings is as important to the entire work of 8 as the standout moments of each song itself, be it devastatingly heavy, manic push and shouts of “Core” or the build that seems to take place in condensed fashion across “Warsheep” earlier, that track resolving itself in a Sleep-worthy nod at its midpoint before a tempo kick brings it to its final movement.

And if one thinks about the title, 8, it kind of makes sense — at least in a similar, on-their-own-wavelength manner as to thinking of the tracks as concise. It’s not just about the number eight, or the fact that this is Ufomammut‘s eighth long-player — it’s their ninth if we count Oro‘s two parts individually or consider the 2014 15th anniversary release, XV (review here) — but the shape of it. Imagine taking the number and stretching it out to a single, straight line. Now draw it back and twist it on itself. It loops around. It intertwines. 8, the album, functions much the same way. The material that comprises it can be taken as individual bursts, but each serves the richer notion of the whole (the proverbial “greater sum”) when brought together, and in that regard, stark changes like the way “Zodiac” seems to come to halt before lurching forth again with some of the most universe-swallowing noise here presented, or the way “Psyrcle” hits its brakes after three minutes in from its initial verses peppered with extra vocal layers — are those children singing? — and explodes in a fury of double-kick drum gallop and brain-searing fretwork, become fragments of a larger musical narrative taking shape over the course of the album.

Whether this concept is something Ufomammut embarked on consciously or it’s simply a matter of a fan-nerd reading too much into a progression between tracks, they made the choice to put these songs in this order with the lack of space between them and in so doing give 8 a personality that even as it seems to tighten the reins from Ecate succeeds in moving Ufomammut stylistically forward. It’s not necessarily just about them getting huger and huger-sounding anymore, but about what can they do within and between the spaces they’re creating. Taking this notion in context with the immediacy of what they’re actually crafting, 8 is all the more an achievement for the nuance it brings to the established parameters of Ufomammut‘s sound and the ways in which the three-piece persist in redrawing their own boundaries.

Ufomammut, “Warsheep” official video

Ufommammut website

Ufomammut on Thee Facebooks

Ufomammut on Twitter

Ufomammut on Instagram

Neurot Recordings website

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Mental Tremors Self-Titled Vinyl Preorders Start this Friday

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 30th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

mental tremors

Upstart purveyor Cursed Tongue Records is set to begin LP preorders for the self-titled debut from Mental Tremors on Friday. Yes, as in the day after tomorrow. Heads up on this one, because whether you want the test pressing edition of 20 copies, the clear vinyl edition of 100 copies or the standard black platter pressing of 200 copies, it seems pretty fair to expect they’ll be gone, if not by the official Oct. 2 release date, then likely shortly thereafter. The Melbourne two-piece released the album earlier this Spring on their own digitally and have been garnering significant momentum since for the classic rolling fuzz of “Patient Man” and the thickened fuzz overload of “Violently,” and one doesn’t have to look far to see why Cursed Tongue would want to be on the case when it comes to getting behind a physical edition. Choice riffs deserve choice presentation.

So yeah, Friday. I’m pretty sure 1800 CET is noon Eastern US. Keep an eye out. If you’re a social media type, I’m sure you’ll see more about it there.

In the meantime, if you’re unfamiliar with the record, it’s streaming in full below for your perusal/convenience, and more info follows from Cursed Tongue via the PR wire:

CTR-004: Mental Tremors – ‘Mental Tremors’

Cursed Tongue Records is extremely happy to finally reveal that they have signed Mental Tremors for a release of their self titled debut album on high quality vinyl this fall.

Who needs a bass-player when you can have bottom heavy fuzz so thick it carves through stone? Sometimes less is more and especially in the case with hard hitting duo Mental Tremors that on their debut deliver deep grooves, fuzzy riffs for miles, sweet melodic licks and offer up a batch of solid rock songs that will have you rolling for a long time.

So fans of The Heavy Eyes, Telekinetic Yeti, Black Prism, KEEF MOUNTAIN, Lord Loud, Teacher, take notice…

Formed in early 2016, heavy psych duo Mental Tremors came together in the rock n roll hotpot of Melbourne, Australia. Hailing from musical backgrounds ranging from blues and metal, to punk and hardcore, the pair united over their mutual love of psych grooves and big bluesy riffs.

Writing and recording of their debut self titled album was completed by the end of 2016 and was released by March 2017, mere weeks after playing their first few shows. Shortly after the album was launched they were signed to the DIY puritans, Cursed Tongue Records, for a special vinyl release of their debut.

The second half of 2017 will see them releasing their vinyl debut, writing more songs, playing more shows and continue asking themselves, “how much noise can two people make?”

Official release date: October 2nd 2017. Preorders for Mental Tremors vinyl LP start September 1st at 6 PM CET (Central European Time, daylight saving on).

Tracklisting:
1. Like A Broken Town 05:21
2. Bastard Son 03:49
3. Patient Man 06:03
4. The Cascade 05:21
5. Interlude 01:17
6. Damn Good Soul 03:32
7. Violently 04:21
8. Hunters 04:39
9. The Fevering 04:28

Mental Tremors is:
Jake – Guitar
Stu – Drums

http://www.facebook.com/mentaltremors
https://www.instagram.com/mentaltremors/
https://mentaltremors.bandcamp.com/
http://cursedtonguerecords.bigcartel.com/
http://www.facebook.com/CursedTongueRecords

Mental Tremors, Mental Tremors (2017)

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Desertfest Belgium 2017: Dool, Troubled Horse, House of Broken Promises, Caronte & Redd Kross Added

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 30th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

2017 might be the year that Desertfest Belgium really pushes outside the titular desert. I mean, yeah, the latest round of lineup additions includes House of Broken Promises, and they’re actually from the sands of Southern California, but look at the rest of the lineup. To bring in the goth-tinged Dool from the Netherlands, or even boogie rockers like Troubled Horse, or doomers Caronte and the long-running Redd Kross and set them up alongside GozuSatan’s SatyrsRadio MoscowSaint Vitus and Conan? It’s all over the place. Shit, to even have Monolord and Unsane on the same bill would be enough, but then you toss in KadavarChurch of Misery and All Them Witches! The fest is right when it says this one is going to be something special. It really looks like it is. I post about a lot of fests. This is the real deal.

Here’s the latest update, courtesy of the PR wire:

desertfest-belgium-2017

Desertfest Antwerp line-up nears completion: DOOL, RED KROSS and more added

Summer’s nearly done, but in this case that’s not bad news – it means Desertfest Antwerp is almost upon us! Hope you all got your tickets, because this one’s going to be the one that you tell your grandchildren about.

You can find the daily line-up on our website, but there still were some holes to fill in the program. We have a bunch of names to seal the deal, beginning with Dutch industrial psychedelic metal combo DOOL.

Furthermore, the Swedish riffsters Troubled Horse will certainly delight all fans who are already present for Graveyard, and we’re equally excited to have the legendary and pioneering LA punk-not-punk band Redd Kross. Finally, with the occult acid doom of Caronte and the desert-stoner of House of Broken Promises, we have another two acts that put the “desert” in Desertfest in their own unique way.

And with that, our line-up is almost completed… start planning your trip to Antwerp!

DOOL

From the industrial underbelly of Rotterdam comes DOOL, bringing you a blend of dark rock, gothic pop and just a hint of psychedelic metal. Featuring members from the legendary Dutch doomsters The Devil’s Blood, Dool bends the influence of bands like Sisters of Mercy and Sonic Youth into a creation that is very much their own unique identity. All those who wander are DOOL!.

TROUBLED HORSE

Formed in 2003 in Örebro (home of fellow rockers Witchcraft) Troubled Horse erupted into the consciousness of riff-worshippers everywhere with their debut Step Inside (2012) and follow-up Revolution On Repeat (2017). Their music is an invigorating whirlwind of spiky garage rock, propulsive psychedelia and thunderous, overdriven soul-meets-doom riffing with little interest in current or nostalgic trends. Despite a gloomy view of humanity, Troubled Horse are never anything less than 100% inspirational.

REDD KROSS

Founded 34 years ago during the first wave of LA punk rock, Redd Kross brought together different styles with an intuitive and eclectic sense of experiment. Crossing the lines between the Partridge Family and the Manson Family, the Beatles and Black Sabbath, The Osmonds and the New York Dolls, Redd Kross certainly was a band ahead of their time. Now in their reunion setup since 2012, they are exactly right on time!

CARONTE

Caronte formed in Parma, Italy, in 2010. The three brothers Dorian, Henry and Tony Bones were joined by eccentric drummer Mike De Chirico to produce a kind of heavy acid doom metal inspired by drugs, alcohol abuse, death, black masses, sex, esoterism and mysticism. At DF Antwerp they will showcase their upcoming album ‘Yoni’ (out 27/10), which they promise will be “the most magic filled work the band has ever written”.

HOUSE OF BROKEN PROMISES

An Indio (CA) based desert-stoner band, formed from the ashes of UNIDA which also featured John Garcia. Biting songs about drug abuse and social upheaval are delivered through bombastic drum beats, guttural vocals and tuned-down guitars. Their debut “Using the Useless” (2009) is considered a minor classic in the scene. After a number of European tours during the last years, the world eagerly awaits their second release.

http://www.desertfest.be/tickets
https://www.facebook.com/desertfestbelgium/
https://www.facebook.com/events/264364590656095/
https://twitter.com/DesertfestBE

Dool, Here Now There Then (2017)

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3rd Ear Experience to Release Stoned Gold Nov. 1; Teaser Clip Posted

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 29th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Set for release Nov. 1, the new outing from Joshua Tree, California-based heavy psych jammers 3rd Ear Experience comes with the formidable backing of Space Rock Productions, the imprint helmed by Scott ‘Dr. Space’ Heller, who, let’s face it, knows a thing or two when it comes to all things heavy and jammy. He’s pretty much a doctor of it. Also actual science, but that’s besides the current point, which is that 3rd Ear Experience will issue their latest opus, the improv-minded Stoned Gold this Fall, and they’re teasing it now with a minute-long clip of scorching guitar that you can see below, set appropriately as it is to sped-up highway footage, presumably of some CA interstate. Maybe the 101? The 10? Hell, I don’t know. Whatever it is, it works.

Gonna hope to have more to come on this one before we get to the release date, but here’s the basic info as per the PR wire and the band’s EPK:

3rd-ear-experience-stoned-gold

3rd Ear Experience – Stoned Gold

We are well pleased to announce our latest album, Stoned Gold!

3rd Ear Experience are pleased to announce the release of a new album; STONED GOLD. Special thanks to Scott Heller and Sabine Pottien of SPACE ROCK PRODUCTIONS who will be pressing and distributing special limited editions of Vinyl and Cd’s. These limited editions will include in the package a Musical Primer called THE ART OF THE JAM BAND based on a letter written by Robbi to his band mates and friends. STONED GOLD is scheduled for release November 1st.

Right from the first warm up jam something broke loose, like a wild horse or like a bottle of whiskey that topples over, pours out onto the floor, someone strikes a match, the barn explodes…don’t know what or how to explain. In a few days we came away with six finished pieces of music – an unexpected surprise. STONED GOLD has a great energy, like that sand-less dust devil rushing across the desert, you cannot see it; but you can feel it and you can hear it.

We are extremely excited to announce that we will be working with Benjamin Schuster from NOISOLUTIONS BOOKING. We look forward to a long and prosperous relationship with this fine company. So, if all goes well in the world, we will be jamming out for you in the new year! – and as our good friend and touring partner Malko assures us : “you are in good hands then”

Hell yea! – we like the sound of that!

Upon the release of STONED GOLD we will also be unveiling our Bandcamp site.

https://www.facebook.com/3rdearexperience/
http://www.robbirobb.com/
https://www.facebook.com/spacerockproductions.dk/
www.spacerockproductions.com/

3rd Ear Experience, Stoned Gold teaser clip

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Ruby the Hatchet, Planetary Space Child: Oh, the Places You’ll Trip

Posted in Reviews on August 29th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

ruby-the-hatchet-planetary-space-child

It’s been a steady creep enacted by Philadelphia’s Ruby the Hatchet into the greater and expanding consciousness of American heavy psychedelia. The organ-laced five-piece from the City of Brotherly Love debuted on respected purveyors Tee Pee Records in 2015 with Valley of the Snake (review here), their second album overall behind 2012’s subsequently reissued Ouroboros and 2014’s Eliminator EP, and Planetary Space Child is their third and most cosmically expansive outing yet.

There have been and continue to be consistent themes in the band’s work — the Adam Burke cover art, the prominent vocals of frontwoman Jillian Taylor, the forward rhythmic push from bassist Lake Muir (who’s come aboard since the last record) and drummer Owen Stewart, a feel somewhere between garage heavy, doom rock and classically stoned ’70s-ism — but the seven-track/41-minute Planetary Space Child from nearly every angle simply brings their approach to a new level, whether that’s the additional percussion and Sean Hur‘s keyboard flourish amid the consuming swirl of effect from guitarist Johnny “Scarps” Scarperia in “Pagan Ritual” or the immediate landmark that the hook in the opening title-track gives the band to build from, so that the later drift of centerpiece “The Fool” after the subtly metallized “Killer” and “Pagan Ritual” has a decided outward direction in which it’s moving. One might say the same of the album as a whole in relation to the band’s preceding material. It’s going farther out.

And make no mistake, it gets there, but with Taylor‘s carefully layered vocals, a depth of mix conjured by Hur and engineers Joe Boldizar of Retro City Studios and Zach Goldstein of Kawari Sound, that easily accommodates the spaciousness required by the blend of keys, guitar, bass and drums as well as the atmosphere of Taylor‘s vocals and those backing her in, say, the seven-minute roller “Symphony of the Night” (is that a Castlevania reference?), there’s never any sense of confusion in terms of Ruby the Hatchet‘s intent. Their command of the song is never relinquished, so that as the just-mentioned “Symphony of the Night” moves toward its speedier midsection via an uptick in organ drama, the listener has no trouble following the band through the shift in ambience. Of course, the righteousness of the gallop that ensues and the clear demonstration of dynamic on the part of the group as a whole don’t hurt either in that regard, but that’s nothing new for Ruby the Hatchet, and whether they’re actively engaging galaxial grandiosity on “Planetary Space Child” — just in case you were looking for the perfect phrase to spraypaint on the back of your van to go with that mountaintop wizard you just put on the side of it — or digging into the more proto-metallic “Killer,” which feels perhaps a bit born of their time on the road alongside Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats and is just one of two songs under five minutes long in a mirror with the penultimate “Gemini,” the vibe they set in these early moments holds firm throughout.

ruby the hatchet

The album was reportedly recorded in an 1800s mansion out in the woods of Pennsylvania, and if nothing else, it’s easy to imagine the place had high ceilings, because while Stewart‘s snare has a decided grounding effect, his perfectly-balanced cymbals ring out like splashes complementing the turns in “Killer” and the momentum that boogie-fueled riff of “Pagan Ritual” thrusts toward, and there is a strong feeling of “room” throughout the proceedings as a whole. That can certainly happen in a cramped studio space as well, of course — age of technological wonders and all that — but if Ruby the Hatchet‘s choice of locale was motivated in part by setting a mood for themselves in addition to the audience, it would seem they made the right choice in that regard and the dividends can be heard as much in the unmitigated hookery of “Killer” and “Planetary Space Child” as well as in the Rocka Rolla chug of “Gemini” or the languid motion of “The Fool.”

Anyone who heard Valley of the Snake and paid even a modicum of attention to what the band was doing therein can tell you they want nothing for songcraft, but this too seems to have been refined in the last two years, and while of course “Symphony of the Night” and grand-finale closer “Lightning Comes Again” — which itself is just shy of the seven-minute line that “Symphony of the Night” so fluidly crosses — have their meandering aspects, there’s zero loss of purpose throughout. To wit, the rhythmic change at 2:14 into “Lightning Comes Again” is a masterpiece moment of transition, and the band utterly nails it, bringing the track to its next stage with unmistakable precision without sounding forced or losing the flow that has brought them so gracefully not only through the quiet opening of that song itself, but of the six prior. The band is signaling at that point that they’ve hit the summary moment for Planetary Space Child as a whole, and so they have. Before the next five-ish minutes are up, they’ll call back to the 8-track-ready circa-’73 idolatry of “Gemini” and “Killer,” the staging sensibility of the title-cut, the rhythmic churn of “Pagan Ritual” and even a bit of the horror-rock flourish of “Symphony of the Night,” with Scarperia finding room for a highlight guitar solo and Stewart marking the ending with a flurry of tom fills behind the assurance from Taylor that, “Lightning will come again.”

She makes it a believable proposition, to say the least, though if lightning is what the band caught in a bottle their last time out on Valley of the Snake, then it would seem it’s already returned. They bring the record to an end with no less a sure hand than they began it, and only bring emphasis to the point that especially if they hit the road again as hard for their third LP as they did for their second, it’s time to start considering Ruby the Hatchet among the top purveyors of heavy psych at least along the East Coast. Where so many other acts seem to get mired in the intensity of the region, the cold weather, the traffic, whatever it is, Ruby the Hatchet have plotted and made their escape from the Northeastern crush, and one can only hope that others will follow the path they’re blazing in these tracks. For its standout choruses, the unrestrained feeling of openness that unites them, the flow and richness of its presentation as a whole, front-to-back listening experience, Planetary Space Child is an absolute must and easily one of 2017’s finest offerings.

Ruby the Hatchet, “Planetary Space Child” official video

Ruby the Hatchet, Planetary Space Child (2017)

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Ruby the Hatchet on Instagram

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Tee Pee Records on Thee Facebooks

Tee Pee Records website

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Thera Roya Announce Masterful Universe EP Due Sept. 8

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 29th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Brooklyn/Jersey-based sludge noisemakers Thera Roya will release a new two-songer dubbed Masterful Universe on Sept. 8. Given the chaos that ensued across their debut full-length, Stone and Skin (review here), I’m just going to go ahead and assume it’s something of an ironic title and that the thesis they’re working under is not so much that the universe is subject to any kind of overriding mastery so much as it’s like a sad and brutal churn playing out over our heads in a fashion worthy of its own searing amp noise and screams. You know, because existential crisis and whatnot.

You can see the postcard-worthy art for Masterful Universe below, followed by more info from the PR wire, which would seem to coincide with my theory given the descriptions of the two tracks involved. Haven’t heard this one yet, but I always look forward to the kind of slaughter these guys bring.

Dig it:

Thera-Roya-Masterful-Universe

Thera Roya – Masterful Universe

3 piece cosmic sludge purveyors bubble back to the surface with new offering Masterful Universe. A 2 song celestial EP commenting on the hopeless world confusion state with an air of nihilistic observation. The world is burning, all the better to hunker down and write an unhinged 7 minute song with one riff (Static Transmission) and a groovy collaged sister track (Confused Population); complete with samples, other-worldly vocals and sick riffs. Teaming up with illustrator Jim Penola garnered a stylized, silly, yet clear representation of the message: the universe is sending a message, people need to tune in and start listening.

Since 2011 Brooklyn based Thera Roya have released 7 EP/Splits and 1 full length (Stone & Skin). Always pushing into different creative territory, TR stubbornly persist, unafraid to explore colors and styles in a metal scene too comfortable with black and white and fitting a mold. Any TR release can range from depressive to unhinged, ecstatic to contemplative, song by song, album to album. TR have toured extensively the past 4 years in the north-east, mid-west and south, carving a rutted name in the underground scene.

Recorded by Jake Drambus, Charlotte NC, Sept 2016. Mixed and Mastered by Jake Drambus. Additional recording/mixing by Ryan Smith. Artwork by Jim Penola.

Tracklisting:
1. Static Transmission
2. Confused Population

Thera Roya is:
Ryan Smith – Drums/Vox/Guitar
Chris Eustaquio – Guitars
Jonny Cohn – Bass

EP release show:
09/07 The Well, Brooklyn, NY w/ Black Black Black, Ereptile Destruction, Fliege
https://www.facebook.com/events/674423602746226/

https://www.facebook.com/TheraRoya/
https://theraroya.bandcamp.com/

Thera Roya, Stone and Skin (2017)

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Demon Eye Announce Fall Shows

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 29th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

You can hear it now in its entirety, but Demon Eye‘s Prophecies and Lies (review here) is still more than a week off from its actual US release date of Sept. 8. Does that mean you’re getting away with something hearing it early? Yeah, probably not, but whatever. The North Carolinian heavy/garage/proto/doom/and-so-on specialists always deliver in terms of songwriting and the new record’s no exception. I’m glad to see they’ll be getting out a bit and supporting the record in the coming months. It’s not a five-week, nonstop, in-the-van-on-the-road tour or anything like that, but some choice shows throughout the South and Midwest coming up between now and December, and every little bit counts.

I feel like you don’t need me to tell you things like “go see good bands,” but yeah, go see good bands. The following brief update from the PR wire tells you where this one will be available for just that purpose:

demon eye

DEMON EYE: North Carolina Occult Metal Collective Announces Fall Live Dates; Soulseller-Bound Prophecies And Lies Full-Length To See North American Release Next Month

Occult metal collective DEMON EYE will embark on a bout of live performances through Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana, and their home state of North Carolina this fall. The band’s latest run of dates come in conjunction with the release of their newest full-length, Prophecies And Lies.

Out now in Europe, Prophecies And Lies was captured by Corrosion Of Conformity’s Mike Dean and finds DEMON EYE’s fiery fusion of heavy classic rock, proto metal, and traditional doom at its most intense to date. A monolithic display of mighty riffs, haunting melodies, and fist-raising anthems, DEMON EYE conjures vintage, heavy darkness for modern day evils.

Prophecies And Lies will be released in North America on September 8th. For US CD preorders go to THIS LOCATION. For US LP preorders go to THIS LOCATION. For orders outside of the US, go HERE.

DEMON EYE:
9/29/2017 Strange Matter – Richmond, VA
9/30/2017 The Taphouse – Norfolk, VA w/ The Norfolk Nightmares
10/04/2017 Neptune’s – Raleigh, NC w/ Man Forever
11/15/2017 The Garage – Winston Salem, NC w/ Lords Of Mace
11/16/2017 Howlers – Pittsburgh, PA w/ Horehound
11/17/2017 Small’s – Detroit, MI
11/18/2017 Taps Live – Indianapolis, IN w/ Karma To Burn
12/01/2017 Snug Harbor – Charlotte, NC

http://www.facebook.com/demoneyenc
http://www.demoneye.bandcamp.com
http://www.demoneyeofficial.com
http://www.soulsellerrecords.com

Demon Eye, Prophecies and Lies (2017)

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Cosmic Fall Post New Jam “A Calmer Sphere”; Announce New Guitarist

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 29th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

cosmic fall

Not so far removed from their Summer 2017 split with Aphodyl (review here) or their last video-based jam-unveiling for the trippy ‘Haumea’ (posted here), and still just months out from their second full-length, Kick out the Jams (review here) behind their 2016 debut, First Fall (discussed here), prolific, hit-the-ground-running psych improvisateurs Cosmic Fall have posted yet another fresh work, in the form of “A Calmer Sphere,” a new clip and instrumental piece to coincide. The title and the soothing fluidity of the jam itself — and make no mistake, it is a jam; basic structure be damned, let’s-go-a-wanderin’-style — may be somewhat aspirational on the part of the three-piece, who would seem to be mired in a bit of drama with their former guitarist, domain name ownership, rights to prior releases, etc., all in flux at the moment, but clearly bassist Klaus and drummer Daniel still have their subtly funkified hearts in the right place when it comes to getting down to the heart of the sun itself, and as they welcome new six-stringer Martin to the fold, it’s not without a hopeful future ahead.

For example, they’re still working quickly, and “A Calmer Sphere” — at 12 minutes long as presented in the clip below of dim-lit performance footage accompanied by sundry suitable B-roll well-fitting to the effects-laced noodling, warm low end and steady-holding drum punctuation — is as much its own destination as its journey. Martin steps forward in a volume swell after the five-minute mark, but the molten vibe of the piece overall is inescapable, and neither are Cosmic Fall trying to escape it. Indeed, if anything has typified the still-and-once-again-nascent trio’s work to date (and I say “once again” because one doesn’t simply swap out members in a band like this where dynamic is everything; it’s a big change and a musical conversation that has to develop in a natural chemistry, more than just bringing in someone to play parts written for them), it’s their utter willingness to dive headfirst into their own explorations, and Martin‘s lack of holding back in the extended lead section, which recedes before “A Calmer Sphere” hits its 10th minute, bodes exceedingly well for how he, Klaus and Daniel will fare moving forward.

The drama, yeah, that’s kind of a bummer. But sometimes those kinds of growing pains happen. Some you win, some you lose, and I can’t imagine it’ll be all that long before Cosmic Fall have a slew of new diggables loaded up on their Bandcamp for the space-hungry masses in their building following. At least not if the pace they’ve worked at so far is anything to go by. Till they get there, you can enjoy “A Calmer Sphere” below, followed by the latest update from the band:

Cosmic Jam, “A Calmer Sphere”

We want to welcome Martin to the band, he’s our new guitar player and now everything is finally working out again! If you haven’t already, you can hear his cosmic guitar playing on this new jam video.

(at the end of the week, we will put this jam together with another one up on bandcamp for free download)

So now we can explain some things to you. Our old guitar player doesn’t allow us to sell our albums on bandcamp anymore, so we were forced to take everything down. We also had to delete all of the videos, photos and downloads on amazon, spotify, itunes and so on. But if you’re interested in buying a CD or Vinyl of our albums, write us an e-mail to: cosmicfallband@gmail.com

He also doesn’t want to give us the domain cosmicfall.com, so we’re not responsible for what happens there, our homepage is: https://cosmicfallband.tumblr.com.

This also means, that our first 3 releases will never be reissued! But don’t worry, the vinyl of “Kick Out The Jams” will come, we will post an update with the details, soon. Now we just want to look ahead and make new music with Martin.

Much love – Dan and Klaus

Cosmic Fall on Bandcamp

Cosmic Fall on Thee Facebooks

Cosmic Fall Tumblr

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