Oryx Announce “Immune to Light Tour”

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 31st, 2016 by JJ Koczan

From Tijuana, Mexico, to Rochester, New York, there’s little by way of ground that the upcoming tour from Denver two-piece Oryx aren’t looking to cover. Unless you count Canada, I guess. Or the rest of Mexico. Or other places. Point is the tour is fucking extensive. It starts on June 30 and runs until damn near September as they head out in support of their recently-issued split with Languish (review/stream here), offered up through respected Arizona imprint Battleground Records. They’re calling the run the “Immune to Light Tour,” which if you haven’t yet stopped reading this and immediately clicked down to peruse the tour dates and watch their video for “The Singularity” from the split, should give you some notion as to the perspective they’re working from.

The PR wire slipped me this one on the sly, because it’s tricky like that. Dig it:

oryx tour poster

ORYX: Denver Sludge/Doom Duo Books Massive Immune To Light US Summer Tour

Denver-based duo, ORYX, will take their piledriving sludge/doom metal out to fans all over the country this Summer, having issued the itinerary for their massive Immune To Light Tour 2016. The bruising venture will see the twosome delivering their bruising tunes to at least forty-one cities between June 30th and August 21st, with the final venues and cities being locked up now.

The Immune To Light Tour 2016 will see ORYX delivering the tunes from their split with Languish, which was released via Battleground Records in April of this year. Drummer Abbey Apple and guitarist/vocalist Tommy Davis deliver a full backline’s worth of damage on their half of the split, including an uncannily brutal Corrupted cover, their all-encompassing hymns swelling with dynamic excursions through the slow-motion realms of demolition. ORYX floods the listener with a deluge of downtuned amplification, polluted quicksand, toxic garbage, and broken hopes, bringing to mind the works of Grief, Electric Wizard, Corrupted, Ufomammut, and the like.

The ORYX/LANGUISH split LP is available through Battleground Records in a run of 300 copies on 180-gram black wax including a digital download, available HERE.

ORYX’ The Immune To Light Tour 2016:
6/30/2016 Replay Lounge – Lawrence, KS
7/01/2016 PMD – Columbia, MO
7/02/2016 Springwater – Nashville, TN
7/03/2016 TBA – Memphis, TN
7/06/2016 The Jinx – Savannah, GA
7/07/2016 Space Station – Orlando, FL
7/08/2016 Kreepy Tiki – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
7/09/2016 The Atlantic – Gainesville, FL
7/10/2016 Shantytown – Jacksonville, FL
7/11/2016 Woodshop – Baton Rouge, LA
7/12/2016 Siberia – New Orleans, LA
7/13/2016 Hi-Tones – San Antonio, TX
7/14/2016 The Lost Well – Austin, TX
7/15/2016 Three Links – Dallas, TX
7/16/2016 The Sandbox – El Paso, TX
7/17/2016 Mods Bar – Tijuana, MX
7/18/2016 Merrow Bar – San Diego, CA
7/19/2016 Deth Haus – Las Vegas, NV
7/20/2016 Que Sara – Long Beach, CA
7/21/2016 Golden Bull – Oakland, CA
7/22/2016 Starlite – Sacramento, CA
7/23/2016 Double Treble – Portland, OR
7/24/2016 Highline Bar – Seattle, WA
7/25/2016 Obsidian Bar – Olympia, WA
7/26/2016 Wastelander Studios – Boise, ID
7/28/2016 Babe House – Laramie, WY
7/29/2016 Spigot – Lincoln, NE
7/30/2016 Wisco Pub – Madison, WI
8/03/2016 Shakespeare’s – Kalamazoo, MI
8/04/2016 New Dodge Lounge – Detroit, MI
8/05/2016 Skeletunes Lounge – Ft. Wayne, IN
8/06/2016 Starbar – Columbus, OH
8/08/2016 Bug Jar – Rochester, NY
8/09/2016 Alternative Gallery – Allentown, PA
8/12/2016 Shred Shed – Philadelphia, PA
8/14/2016 TBA – Winston Salem, NC
8/15/2016 TBA – Asheville, NC
8/17/2016 The Hideaway – Johnson City, TN
8/18/2016 Highlands Bar – Louisville, KY
8/19/2016 Lost Cross House – Carbondale, IL
8/21/2016 The Elbow Room – Wichita, KS


Oryx, “The Singularity” official video

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The Black Explosion Release Atomic Zod War June 24

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 31st, 2016 by JJ Koczan

Swedish trio The Black Explosion run the line somewhere between blues rock and spaced-out psychedelia, and that territory suits them pretty well from what I’ve thus far heard. Their third outing, Atomic Zod War, is set for issue on June 24 via Metalville Records, and finds them hitting the half-decade mark in their freakout-prone approach, the band having been founded in 2011 by guitarist/vocalist Chris Winter, formerly and seemingly once again of heavy rockers Dollhouse.

The PR wire brings album details:

the black explosion


In their five years of existence, universal Space Rock act THE BLACK EXPLOSION has become an institution of Scandinavian rock.

Featuring Chris Winter (guitar and vocals), Addman Lindqvist (drums), and Simon Haraldsson (bass), THE BLACK EXPLOSION’s third release entitled Atomic Zod War is scheduled for release in North America via Metalville Records June 24.

Atomic Zod War is a freakin’ free spaced out to the top album with a twist of dark infinity. The music of this piece was arranged and recorded while the band was stranded on planet earth for a short time during a universal tour. Instead of wasting time waiting for their ship to get repaired they decided to enter SGV studios. The result is an album full of very retro space rock soundscapes.

Atomic Zod War is the best matured recording of the band’s career and also again an outstanding tribute to heroes like Hawkwind and MC5.

Since its foundation by ex-Dollhouse mastermind Chris Winter in 2011, THE BLACK EXPLOSION has remained true to their dark Space Rock ideals. It’s all there: sci-fi, space, doom, stoner, acid and psychedelic, and together with their high energetic live performances it all gets complete.

Official Atomic Zod War Tracklist
1. Paralyzed
2. Ain’t Coming Home
3. World Is Dead
4. Location 9
5. Going Down
6. Get My Mind Together
7. Devil Inside


The Black Explosion, “The Sun-Eater”

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The Myrrors New Album Entranced Earth out Now

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 31st, 2016 by JJ Koczan

the myrrors

Tucson-based psychedelic soundscapers The Myrrors have released their new album, Entranced Earth, via Beyond Beyond is Beyond. Their third long-player, it’s a record of noteworthy expanse and patience and sopping wet with trippy fervor, but not staid or indulgent more than the material seems to warrant. The vinyl is a black and white spatter, but the music itself works in a wide array of colors and shapes, and as the empty, rolling landscape on the album cover hints, it’s all very open, sparse at times, but teeming with life under the surface.

It’s streaming in full (of course it is; it’s the future!), so you can dive into info and audio below:

the myrrors entranced earth


There’s a confounding nature to the comfort constructed by The Myrrors throughout the flawless forty minutes of “Entranced Earth,” the third full-length album from the transcendentally-tuned, Tuscon-tied desert die-hards (and their second for Beyond Beyond Is Beyond Records).

Those looking for terra firma – for ground not given to staggering shifts, for easily grasped handholds, for the force of gravity as we know it – are likely to find the album an often-groundless experience. But for listeners willing to give themselves over to the landscape presented on “Entranced Earth,” the reward lies in the discovery of new lands, and the sound of a band operating at the peak of their powers.

When last we saw the reflection of The Myrrors, it was in the form of their previous release, “Arena Negra,” an album that announced its presence immediately and with high dosage of the appropriate amplification. “Entranced Earth,” by contrast, gives indication of The Myrrors entering an altogether different atmosphere, taking on an altogether higher climb, shorn of all hesitation and allowing their freak flags to unfurl and fly like never before.

Still, it’s difficult (and altogether unnecessary) to pin down “Entranced Earth” beyond the spires of sonic smoke that the album seems to generate at will. So subtle is the album- opening invocation of “Mountain Mourning” that it threatens to never descend from its sky-bound view, leaving the track that follows, “Liberty Is In the Street,” to offer the album’s first, fading glimpse of solid ground. “On your feet or on your knees” goes the mantra-like vocal drone, though the effect is likely to bring to mind the Moody Blues more than Blue O?yster Cult (at least, the path of The Myrrors seems to include traces of the footprints left by the one-time Harvard professor given an early eulogy by the Blues on “Legend of a Mind”). By the time that “No Clear Light” – a torch-lit, dust-crusted dirge that can be felt as the beating heart of the album overall – leads listeners toward the nearly nine-minute title track and album centerpiece, there are doubtlessly many more wanderers pledging allegiance to The Myrrors unnamed cult.

Guitars of six and twelve strings, harmonium, tablas, alto sax, bulbul tarang – these are the tools of The Myrrors all-consuming quest, expertly applied for maximum elevation. Enter the realm of “Entranced Earth,” sit still and let the ground disappear beneath your feet. – Ryan Muldoon


The Myrrors, Entranced Earth (2016)

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Earthless & Harsh Toke, Acid Crusher / Mount Swan: Acidic Compounds

Posted in Reviews on May 31st, 2016 by JJ Koczan

earthless harsh toke acid crusher mount swan

Whoever first had the idea to pair up Earthless and Harsh Toke for a split full-length, he or she was correct. Hardly the deepest critical insight I’ve ever had, but there it is. The San Diego longform heavy psychedelic rockers team exceedingly well on the 12″ platter, Acid Crusher / Mount Swan, each band offering a side-consuming single track immersion with a different take on similarly-intentioned righteousness. For the heads who will get it, this review is superfluous. Not only does Acid Crusher / Mount Swan sell itself to the already-converted, but comes across more as a victory lap than a release, Earthless‘ “Acid Crusher” and Harsh Toke‘s “Mount Swan” both taking ‘er easy all over lazy-day lysergics, unleashing instrumental chemistry between them the likes of which few others could claim as their own. That’s true of both bands, by the way, and not just Earthless.

Aside from the sonic commonalities, one reason Acid Crusher / Mount Swan works so well is that it brings together that landmark three-piece — whose last album was 2013’s From the Ages (review here) but who also had a new song out earlier this year on a Scion-sponsored multi-band EP — with a younger outfit who clearly on one level or another are working under their influence and successfully bringing their own personality to their approach. There’s little question that Earthless have been a key factor in the boom of West Coast heavy psych of the last five years or so, and their presence here alongside Harsh Toke both reinforces their position at the fore of that movement and demonstrates some of the best of what’s being done with the impact they’ve had.

It’s worth acknowledging as well that Acid Crusher / Mount Swan might be a listener’s first exposure to Harsh Toke, who made their debut on Tee Pee in 2014 with the grower-listen Light up and Live, touring Europe that same year including a stop at Roadburn and going back last fall alongside labelmates Sunder, and if that’s the cast, then all the better for the impression they give. Their “Mount Swan” clocks in at just a bit under 20 minutes and offers molten psychedelic flow, some early vocals acting as the ground from which the subsequent instrumental breadth takes off. I don’t know how much of it is improvised or plotted out beforehand, outlined or meticulously written out measure by measure, but the flow they enact feeds gorgeously from the laid back motion of Earthless‘ 15-minute “Acid Crusher,” which over on side A pulls back on some of the thrust for which the band is known in favor of a key-and-percussion-laced fusion-style rollout, steady funk groove underlying the straightforward, grounding drum progression from Mario Rubalcaba.

earthless harsh toke acid crusher mount swan vinyl

The fluidity there becomes the theme that unites both tracks, and though Harsh Toke start out with a somewhat foreboding nod, after the initial verses, by the time they’re two minutes in, they set to a for-its-own-sake meandering that defines the rest of the song, starting out with a wash of feedback and noise and tripping on slow-motion cosmic swirl marked by periodic upticks in pace and an increased push of kick drum late. Would be fair enough to call it a payoff toward the end, but “Mount Swan” is less about a linear progression upward than a liquefied spreading outward, and that remains true even as the wheels start to come off near the finish and the dual guitars chug and solo around the central rhythm when the drums have faded out. The guitars fade out too, as it happens, which leads me to believe that somewhere on this planet there exists and even longer version of “Mount Swan” than that which appears here.

I started with the B-side for a reason, and that reason might be that Earthless are almost a given at this point. Rubalcaba, guitarist Isaiah Mitchell (also of Golden Void) and bassist Mike Eginton, hit their 15th year together in 2016, and though they only put out albums sporadically, the mark they’ve left can be heard throughout the West Coast and beyond. With “Acid Crusher,” they make it plain that they’ve by no means finished their exploration. They waste no time getting down to the business of groove with serene key work and fuzzy tones marching in step backed by percussion, flourishes of tambourine and an underlying current of volume swells and other effects, what sound like Echoplex loops but may or may not actually be. As is their wont generally, “Acid Crusher” is entirely instrumental, but it’s more than a jam as well, setting its vibe in the first half and expanding it in the second as Mitchell takes an extended solo at the 10-minute mark and uses it to lead the band to the song’s peak, which subsides in the last minute or so — presumably by then the acid in question has been thoroughly crushed — and they return to the locked-in groove that’s been at the center all along.

In showcasing their nuance and the fact that they can basically go wherever they want and make it work, “Acid Crusher” brings forward a different side of Earthless than some of the more raucous classic-style heavy psych for which they’re known, and Harsh Toke complement that well with “Mount Swan” while also affirming that Light up and Live‘s follow-up will be one worth anticipating. As I said at the outset, there will be many listeners who take on Acid Crusher / Mount Swan for whom its quality will be an absolute given, but even for those who might approach it on less sure footing, the delivery on the part of both acts winds up being pretty inarguable. These are two of the finest in heavy psych that California has to offer. They’re doing what they do.

Earthless, “Acid Crusher”

Harsh Toke, “Mount Swan”

Earthless on Thee Facebooks

Earthless on Instagram

Harsh Toke on Thee Facebooks

Harsh Toke on Instagram

Tee Pee Records

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Landing Post “Morning Sun” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 31st, 2016 by JJ Koczan


Like the song it features, much of Landing‘s new video is impressionistic. Footage of vocalist Adrienne Snow reciting the lyrics is overlaid with a gently rolling tide, and elsewhere there are images of color and shapes that feel less geared toward telling a story than complementing the atmosphere of “Morning Sun” as a whole. There is, of course, plenty of atmosphere to complement. The Connecticut-based four-piece — Adrienne as well as Aaron SnowDaron Gardner and John Miller — issue their new album, Third Sight, June 17 via El Paraiso Records, and though it only comprises four tracks, it effectively creates its own world within those songs and invites the listener to engage with it.

Third Sight is my first exposure to the New Haven outfit, who’ve been around since 1998, but better late than never for the bright tones and immersive ambience they bring to this latest and by my count eighth full-length outing, which as previously noted, may be one of two out before the end of the year. If you haven’t had the chance to check them out yet, “Morning Sun” might take a runthrough or two to really sink in, since invariably the first time it’ll just hypnotize and leave you wondering where the last five minutes just went when it’s done, but it proves immediately worth repeat, steadfastly conscious listens.


Landing, “Morning Sun” official video

Morning Sun
from the album Third Sight
LP + CD available June 17th, 2016 from El Paraiso Records
Directed by Aaron Snow
© 2016 Structure vs Chaos Music (SESAC)

Catalog number: EPR034
Formats: CD/DL/LP (transparent green vinyl limited to 750 copies, includes download card)
Release date: June 17, 2016
Distributed by: Cargo Records / Forced Exposure (US)

Connecticut’s Landing have specialized in a mild and rural kind of psychedelia for almost two decades. Recent releases have seen them closer to post-punk and shoegaze territory than ever, but Third Sight – recorded specifically for El Paraiso Records’ Impetus series – builds on the hallucinatory soundscapes of the band’s earliest days.

There’s a unique sense of motoric drift to these four long pieces, and an organic blend of rock instrumentation and analog electronics that brings to mind Eno’s best collaborations in the 1970s. But the group’s flair for fuzzy drones and new weirdsy commune-folk also betrays their affiliation with the experimental American east coast scene – playing shows with Bardo Pond, releasing a split EP with Windy & Carl, playing Terrastock a couple of times, among other things throughout their career.

Landing on Thee Facebooks

Landing on Bandcamp

Landing website

El Paraiso Records website

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There Will be Blood Release Horns on June 10

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 31st, 2016 by JJ Koczan

there will be blood

Italian boogie-blues rockers There Will be Blood may have named themselves after an exceedingly dark, grim, at-times brutal movie, but the material on their third album, Horns, seems to be much more upbeat and much less prone to take itself seriously. To wit, the band’s video for “Undertow” below, which looks like a Wes Anderson-filmed workout parody. The new record from which that song comes will be released on June 10 — egad, that’s next week! — via Blues for the Red Sun Records, and reportedly wraps a trilogy about redemption and weirdos which the PR wire describes below.


there will be blood horns


Album out June 10th 2016 on Blues For The Red Sun.

The story of There Will Be Blood started back in 2009, and in the seven years passed they have made 3 albums and 2 EPs, playing live around Italy in festivals and rock clubs, gaining excellent reviews from press and audience. Their third album “Horns” is the end of a trilogy of concept albums that tell the story of a lone wandering man looking for a way to redeem his soul and finally find his vengeance, crossing his path with all kinds of freaks and prodigies, miracles and disasters.

Compared with the previous albums, “Horns” is a more articulated work; the band has put a lot of effort into these 12 tracks, challenging themselves with new styles and new influences. Through their collaboration with professional musicians, “Horns” has become their biggest project so far: choir, harps, trum- pets, saxophones, trombones, pianos and keyboards add layers and volume to There Will Be Blood’s fantastic blues-rock sound.

With elements from classic blues, rock and roll, soul, gospel, stoner and country the band stretches their signature sound to new frontiers, without losing their focus on strong riffs, powerful drums and the catchy lyrics that we love.

All music and lyrics written and performed by There Will Be Blood. Recorded and mixed by Andrea Cajelli at the Sauna Recording studio/ Varese. Studio assistant: Andrea Ravasio. Mastered by Andrea “Berni” De Bernardi at Eleven Mastering/ Busto Arsizo Album cover “Drive-in” by Jesse Treece www.collageartbyjesse.tumblr.com. Album artwork by Riccardo Giacomin www.riccardogiacomin.com

Burn Your Halo
Blind Wandering

Turn Your Back
Short Breath
Til Death Do Us Apart


There will be Blood, “Undertow” official video

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Guitarist Adrian Zambrano Leaves Lo-Pan

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 30th, 2016 by JJ Koczan

Ohio heavy rockers Lo-Pan have announced the departure of guitarist Adrian Zambrano from their lineup. Zambrano joined the Columbus-based four-piece late in 2014 to fill the role initially occupied by Brian Fristoe, and accompanied the band on their inaugural European tour last year as well as US dates earlier in 2016 with Black Cobra, Bongzilla and Kings Destroy (review here).

His leaving is a genuine surprise. Lo-Pan have most if not all of a new album recorded as a follow-up to their fourth outing, 2014’s Colossus (review here), and Zambrano‘s departure, which the band notes is amicable, leaves it to question what’s to become of those songs and those recordings of them in particular. Of course, the bigger and more immediate issue is who’s going to take over that spot in the band — riffs aren’t exactly a small part of what they do — but the future is yet uncertain or at least unannounced for what would have been and may still be his studio debut with Lo-Pan, now also a swansong for this incarnation of their lineup.

Zambrano, who also plays in Brujas del Sol, excelled in the guitarist position while he had it. I was fortunate enough to see Lo-Pan with him twice and both times he added a presence and energy alongside drummer Jesse Bartz, bassist Scott Thompson and vocalist Jeff Martin that only added to the force of their stage delivery. Should probably go without saying, but good luck to him and good luck to the band in finding somebody to handle guitar. When and if I hear more about their next release, I’ll let you know.

Lo-Pan are currently slated to play Psycho Las Vegas in August. Here’s the statement from the band:


Our guitarist Adrian Zambrano has decided he needs to walk away from Lo-Pan at this time to focus on some other important parts of life. We would like to emphasize that this is an amicable split and we wish him all the best. We are currently on the hunt for a new guitarist and we hope to see you all again as soon as possible. Stay tuned for announcements and new music.


Lo-Pan, Live at Saint Vitus Bar, April 1, 2016

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Hijo de la Tormenta, El Manto de la Especie: Finding Ground

Posted in Reviews on May 30th, 2016 by JJ Koczan

hijo de la tormenta el manto de la especie

I don’t imagine I need to run down the history of Argentina’s heavy rock scene for you — from Pappo’s Blues through Los Natas and into modern fuzz and sludge like Demonauta — but suffice it to say the country’s contributions to the international sphere of underground rock and roll have been manifold, varied and forward-looking. They have been a part of the conversation for as long as the conversation has been happening. All this is as a preface to note that with their second album, El Manto de la Especie, Cordoba-based trio Hijo de la Tormenta are stepping forward to claim their piece of this storied real estate. They do so with six tracks and just under 38 minutes of laid back, tonally resonant, subtly jazzy heavy, earthy psychedelia, confident in its execution, organic in its presentation and warm in its effect on the listener.

When so inclined, as on “Manifiesto al Sol” or “El Abuelo,” the lyrics for which are based on a Walt Whitman poem, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Juan Cruz Ledesma, bassist Guido Di Carlo and drummer Santiago Ludueña — plus Fabricio Morás on keys for “Rock Para Huir de una Ciudad,” “53 Cosechas” and “Manifiesto al Sol” — are able to enact a formidable heavy roll, and they do so bringing Di Carlo‘s bass forward on “El Abuelo” to enact El Manto de la Especie‘s most engaging nods. The context in which it arrives is no less pivotal to the overall impression of the album, however, and spacious, airy keyboards and swinging cymbal work in the aforementioned “Rock Para Huir de una Ciudad,” which opens, help set an exploratory tone guided by sure hands.

Hijo de la Tormenta made their self-titled debut (review here) in 2014 and tagged it as “mountain psychedelia.” Their second album offers some similar vibe — you’ll note I called it “earthy” above — but feels less limited in its landscape, which is a sign of the growth in chemistry the trio have undertaken in the last two years. The scope of El Manto de la Especie is broader, in other words, but the flow is no less consuming, as “Rock Para Huir de una Ciudad” opens quietly and shifts into heavier push to make way for the start-stop fuzz of “53 Cosechas” and the jam-into-low-end-bliss of “El Abuelo,” which hypnotizes in its first half of its six minutes only to offer a knockout blow of bass in its second, all in quick succession.

Part of that the first three tracks are legitimately shorter than what follows — apart from closer “Recibimiento,” which is two minutes long — as both “Manifiesto al Sol” (8:37) and “Un Mañana Aún Más Glorioso Nos Espera” (12:31) range farther, but the feeling of continuity between the first three songs is essential to how the album overall leads the listener through its course, and the fluidity of groove that persists isn’t to be understated. Hijo de la Tormenta are in no rush, and their songwriting is patient, encompassing and varied in structure, but they’re not simply wandering for the sake of wandering either. That motion that pushes through one song into the next gives a linear feel, and the sense of design in the record’s structure, drawing the listener in early and establishing such a rich atmosphere of natural tonality, only speaks to the level of conscious intent at play on the part of the band. They make it sound effortless, and maybe it is since nothing here sounds forced in the slightest, but it’s an admirable outcome either way and it makes El Manto de la Especie a joy front to back.


And when they do make their way to “Manifiesto al Sol” and “Un Mañana Aún Más Glorioso Nos Espera,” the signal is pretty clear that they’ve arrived at the heart of the album. Aside from the fact that, together, the two tracks account for more than half the total runtime, the feeling as the lightly progressive beginning of “Manifiesto al Sol” gets underway is that the trio have been working toward this build. The rhythm calms somewhat before Ledesma‘s vocals come in with a melody that reminds of Been Obscene, and by then they’re more than halfway through. Keyboards again play a large role as they push into more weighted low end and a fuzzed-out guitar solo, bringing a chorus back late to finish, and quiet guitar noodling opens “Un Mañana Aún Más Glorioso Nos Espera,” going past two minutes before the first cymbal crash accompanies.

There are some trades between quiet and loud parts, but the core of El Manto de la Especie‘s longest track remains the instrumental chemistry between LedesmaDi Carlo and Ludueña, vocals arriving after the band has shifted seamlessly through heavier thrust and atmospheric desert jazz, which quiets down at the midpoint only to pick up again, led by fuzz guitar, backed by fuzz bass, propelled by the drums as they hit the peak that serves as the payoff for the album as a whole. They end “Un Mañana Aún Más Glorioso Nos Espera” quiet and offer a pastoral epilogue in the acoustic-meets-e-bow “Recibimiento,” some late “oohs” providing the closer’s only vocals for a harmonized, folkish feel. Hopefully that’s something Hijo de la Tormenta are teasing perhaps as a signal of future progression, i.e., where they might be headed, but it also adds another element to El Manto de la Especie while retaining the ambience of the material preceding.

The clear maturity Hijo de la Tormenta showcase on what’s still just their second full-length is likewise encouraging as regards future prospects for staking their stylistic claim, but that shouldn’t undercut the value of what they’ve accomplished here either. With these songs, they both signal what they have to offer going forward and begin making that offering.

Hijo de la Tormenta, El Manto de la Especie (2016)

Hijo de la Tormenta on Thee Facebooks

Hijo de la Tormenta on Bandcamp

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